Redskins

Quick Links

Ron Rivera likes opening season against NFC East winner Eagles

Ron Rivera likes opening season against NFC East winner Eagles

Ron Rivera wants his team to be battle-tested early, so he is glad to see the Philadelphia Eagles as the Redskins first opponent of the 2020 season.

"I like the fact that we start off against the defending division champs (Eagles), cause its a great measuring stick for us to see where we are as a football team," Rivera told the Redskins' Larry Michael on the Redskins Schedule Release show Thursday night. "Then we follow it up by going out to Arizona to see a team that started anew last year, so we'll get a good sense as to what it takes to get going."

Rivera's approach to see where his football team is as a unit from the get-go a welcomed sight for Redskins fans who are ready to see this team take it to the next level after a 3-13 record last season.

 

CLICK HERE TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE REDSKINS TALK PODCAST

Football's scheduled return gives the team a sense of normalcy after a very different off-season structure due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Rivera is ready to get going when the time comes.

"I'm excited about the way we're going to start the season," he added. "I'm just looking forward to getting the opportunity to start coaching again."

Stay connected to the Capitals and Wizards with the MyTeams app. Click here to download for comprehensive coverage of your teams.

MORE REDSKINS NEWS

Quick Links

How quickly can the Redskins change their name? Nike has something to do with it

redskinshelmet_usat.jpg
USA TODAY Sports Images

How quickly can the Redskins change their name? Nike has something to do with it

The Washington Redskins announced last week they are undergoing a "thorough review" of its team name and, in all likelihood, a name change is inevitable.

Last week, the organization faced a tremendous amount of public pressure from some of its largest corporate sponsors, such as FedEx, PepsiCo and Nike, to change the name. On Saturday, Washington head coach Ron Rivera said he hopes the team name is changed before the 2020 NFL season.

However, switching the name requires multiple steps, both legally and business-wise. According to CNBC sports business reporter Eric Chemi, a name change before the season is possible, but not without financial losses for some of those same sponsors pressuring Washington to make the move. 

"It's possible - if companies like Nike want to lose a lot of money on the gear they've already made," Chemi said. 

Chemi compared the situation to when athletes themselves decide to change their name and the fallout that comes from that. Companies like Nike and other jersey manufacturers have licenses that prevent players from changing their name or number right before the season.

CLICK HERE TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE REDSKINS TALK PODCAST

When former Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver Chad Johnson legally changed his last name to 'OchoCinco' in 2008, Reebok, the NFL's jersey manufacturer at the time, did not sell jerseys with 'OchoCinco' on the back for the rest of the year. For Reebok to sell Johnson's new uniform, the wideout would have had to purchase the estimated 100,000 'C. Johnson' jerseys remaining on store shelves in America, according to CNBC.

"We've seen that when athletes change their name, sometimes companies say 'No, we've spent too much money making jerseys with your name already on it,'" Chemi said. "Or, if you want to change your jersey number, 'Sorry, we need a one-year heads up on that.'"

We saw this most recently this past offseason in the NBA when Anthony Davis was traded to the Los Angeles Lakers. Davis, who had worn No. 23 his entire career prior to the deal, was expected to be gifted that number by LeBron James, who planned to switch back to the No. 6 he wore when he was a member of the Miami Heat.

Davis was unable to get No. 23, as Nike prevented the switch from happening because it was past the March 15 deadline. Davis ultimately decided to wear No. 3 this season, with James keeping his original No. 23.

RELATED: FRED SMOOT SAYS REDSKINS HAVE NARROWED NEW NAME CHOICE DOWN TO TWO OR THREE OPTIONS

Currently, there is still plenty of Redskins gear on store shelves across the country. Although Nike has removed Washington's gear from its website, the company still makes money when its product is purchased through the team or other manufacturers that sell Nike products.

Nike released a statement last Friday saying it was "pleased" that the Redskins organization was moving forward to change its name. And if the company is comfortable with losing money by having the name changed, Chemi believes it's a possibility it happens before the 2020 season.

"So, if they're willing to lose a lot of money on stuff they've already made, then sure, maybe they can go ahead in the next month and change the name."

Stay connected with the Redskins in the MyTeams app. Click here to download for comprehensive coverage of your teams.

MORE TEAM NAME NEWS:

Quick Links

These well-known Redskins fans would be very interesting minority stakeholders

These well-known Redskins fans would be very interesting minority stakeholders

The Redskins' three minority owners, who reportedly make up about 40-percent of the team's ownership group, are actively trying to sell their stakes in the club.

Now, if those three do in fact move on — which may prove difficult — there are plenty of well-known Washington fans who could prove to be interesting replacements, even if they purchase just a small slice of what the trio is looking to pass on. 

Check out the list below for a handful of the more eye-catching names that would absolutely draw headlines. 

Dale Earnhardt Jr.

One of NASCAR's most popular drivers of all time is now working as an analyst for NBC. He's been a fan since he was nine years old and has a positive relationship with Dan Snyder. Plus, he's already used to pressure-packed Sundays.

Matthew McConaughey

Here's another mega-celebrity and lifelong fan of the Burgundy and Gold who's also a personal friend of Snyder's. Perhaps he'd like to add some football hardware to his already crowded trophy case.

Kevin Durant

Durant is one of the best ballers in the world, and with how enormous NBA contracts are as well as all the endorsements he's picked up along the way, you have to figure he has some spare cash to put toward the Redskins if he wanted to.

Plus, becoming a part owner of an NFL team would be something he could hold over his enemies like Draymond Green and Kendrick Perkins.

RELATED: A NAME CHANGE SEEMS IMMINENENT

Wale

The famous rapper just hosted some of the Redskins' virtual programming during the 2020 Draft, and he's tight with QB Dwayne Haskins. He could be next in the long line of artists/musicians who've dabbled in sports ownership.

Taraji P. Henson

The Hidden Figures and Empire actress' father once worked as a janitor for Washington, and she's been a supporter of the squad for quite a while. Buying into them could be a nice thing to add to her real-life empire.

Joe Gibbs

Gibbs isn't exactly a current pop culture icon like any of the names above, but he is a DC icon and it'd be foolish to exclude him from a list like this. Snyder has understandably revered Gibbs for essentially his whole life and confided in him often in the past.

If Gibbs wanted to become involved with the Redskins again, you have to believe Snyder would be thrilled.  

Alexis Ohanian

Ohanian, who co-founded Reddit and sold it back in 2006, has been devoted to the Redskins since the late '80s. He's attended plenty of contests in his fan career. So, why not make the transition from the stadium seats to the owner's box?

Stay connected with the Redskins in the MyTeams app. Click here to download for comprehensive coverage of your teams.

MORE TEAM NAME NEWS: