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Sources: Redskins only trade demand for Trent Williams is 'something comparable in value'

Sources: Redskins only trade demand for Trent Williams is 'something comparable in value'

Trent Williams wants to be traded, that much is obvious, but the Redskins will only trade him for a package of comparable value. 

It's been widely reported that Washington wants a second-round pick in exchange for Williams, but according to sources close to the team, that doesn't mean only a second-round pick will get the deal done. 

"They're not being stubborn," one source said of trade talks. 

Considering the wide array of trades that have already happened this offseason, multiple teams have already looked at flexible ways to exchange players and draft picks as a means to get deals done. 

For the Redskins and Williams, that could mean that conversations centered around a second-round pick evolve into a package that doesn't contain a second-rounder but delivers similar value.

An example of that came from a SNY report that the Jets might consider trading two third-round picks to Washington for Williams instead of a single second-round pick. Around the NFL, many teams use some similar approach that specific draft picks contain a specific numeric value, and the Redskins want to attain that value more than the organization is focused on a specific pick. In this case, both Jets third-round picks would equate to a single second-rounder.

"It's a willingness to be creative," one source said. 

On Monday, Trent Williams' agent put out a statement that said the Redskins had been operating without "good faith" to get a trade done and the team's demands had been "inconsistent."

It's highly possible, even probable, that trying to hammer out terms of a complicated trade deal with a value comparable to a seven-time Pro Bowl left tackle require vision, and that each conversation does not sound the same. 

Let's also be clear about something: Washington will not give Williams away without good value.

He's one of the best offensive linemen in the NFL. If that player isn't worth a second-round pick, or perhaps an equivalent package, is it worth trading Williams? That's the question being kicked around among Redskins officials. 

The flip side of all of this is that Williams also wants to work out a new long-term contract, reportedly one that will pay him north of $18 million per season. That presents a big hurdle too, as Williams will be 32 this fall and hasn't played a full 16-game season since 2013. He missed all of last year due to a cancerous tumor on his scalp and a contract holdout. 

There are competing interests at play. 

Williams' group wants a trade and to get paid. The Redskins want appropriate value for a star lineman that is still under contract. 

It doesn't help either that the NFL's new collective bargaining agreement effectively ends contract holdouts. Last year, Williams didn't play but the season still tolled on his contract. This year, if Williams holds out, he will still have one year left on his deal. Holding out loses all value in that scenario. 

For the right price, it sounds like both sides want a deal done, but need to find a team willing to pay Williams and deliver value to the Redskins. It hasn't happened. Yet. 

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Report: Minority owners pressuring Dan Snyder to sell Washington Football Team

Report: Minority owners pressuring Dan Snyder to sell Washington Football Team

Dan Snyder is facing mounting pressure from three of his minority investors to sell the Washington Football Team according to a new report from The Wall Street Journal.

“The stakes have attracted interest from a variety of potential buyers, but Mr. Snyder has been reluctant to give any of them the option to eventually buy control despite the attempt to oust him,” the Journal wrote in its story Thursday afternoon.  “That has prompted some would-be buyers to walk away.”

Snyder’s ownership seems to face battles on nearly every front.

In the last six weeks the team dropped its more than 80-year old “Redskins” moniker amid threats from multiple sponsors of significant lost revenue due to its racist connotations. 
Last month, a Washington Post story alleged widespread sexual harassment and verbal abuse against women inside the organization and the team is now conducting an internal investigation on the report.

The three minority investors combine own about 40% of the team but their shares would be worth much more if the entire organization was up for sale. 

RELATED: DAN SNYDER ATTORNEY RAISES CONSPIRACY QUESTIONS

Snyder has also filed a defamation lawsuit in federal court this week that loosely claims a conspiracy against him from one of the team’s current investors. A lawyer for Snyder told NBC Sports Washington on Tuesday that a former team employee bribed an Indian media company to put out a defamatory and false story against him. 

The Journal reports that tensions between Snyder and his minority investors have simmered for “at least a year.” It writes that FedEx founder and chairman Frederick Smith, one of the three minority owners and the man whose company has the naming writes to Washington’s home stadium, attempted to sell his share of the team last year only to have a slow approval process involving Snyder sink a potential deal. The interested investor instead purchased a minority stake in another NFL team. 

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Jets DC Gregg Williams says Jamal Adams will "get bored" after trade to Seahawks

Jets DC Gregg Williams says Jamal Adams will "get bored" after trade to Seahawks

Once the Jets agreed to send Jamal Adams to the Seahawks in exchange for three draft picks, it ended a long saga between the disgruntled superstar and the franchise. Or so we thought. 

During a conference call with reporters Thursday, former Washington and current Jets defensive coordinator Gregg Williams expressed his concern with Adams' new team, saying he'll be "bored there." 

"Jamal may get bored there because they don't use safety-type things and all the different complexities of maybe not showing what they're doing as much as we do," Williams said. "We'll still do the same patterns of things, we'll still do a lot of the same exact things, but we'll highlight the people we have here."

The Seahawks have a reputation for their zone defense, which reached its peak with the "Legion of Boom" with Richard Sherman, Earl Thomas and Kam Chancellor. Adams figures to add to that legacy of success in the secondary and help put a contending Seattle team over the top in the NFC. 

RELATED: ADAMS DIDN'T WANT A TRADE TO WASHINGTON

Still, Williams' overall point was that their defensive scheme doesn't tend to highlight the skills of its players as much as his does in New York. 

"You saw what we did [in 2019] was, [Adams] had maybe his most productive year here because we highlighted the skill sets that he's had," he said. "I've had a lot of really good guys at that position, a lot of really good safeties to build things around."

It's hard to argue with that. I mean, Adams became an All-Pro last year at the age of 24 and solidified himself as one of the best defensive players in the game.

But you also can't argue with the track record Seattle's system has had over the years. No matter what players have played on that defense, they're routinely solid and difficult to move the ball on. If the Seahawks don't bring Adams to a new level, there's a good chance he'll be able to do it for them. 

Great players typically elevate good systems. 

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