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There's one word to describe new offensive coordinator Scott Turner's offense in 2020

There's one word to describe new offensive coordinator Scott Turner's offense in 2020

Ron Rivera's first free agency class with the Redskins consisted of just over a dozen players, many of which share this one specific trait: versatility.

On the offensive side of the ball, Washington added running back J.D. McKissic, who can both run in between the tackles and catch passes out of the backfield. Additionally, the team added a pair of offensive lineman, Cornelius Lucas and Wes Schweitzer, who both have experience playing multiple positions along the line. 

The trend of adding versatile players continued in the draft. The Redskins invested a third-round pick in RB/WR hybrid Antonio Gibson and followed that selection with fourth-round pick Saahdiq Charles, who played both tackle spots at LSU. The Redskins used another Day 3 pick on Keith Ismael, who played all three interior offensive line spots at San Diego State.

Offensive coordinator Scott Turner was asked this week why the team emphasized versatility so much this offseason, and the 37-year-old's reply was simple.

"I think you want to be as unpredictable as possible," Turner told local media via Zoom this week. "You don’t want the defense to know what you’re going to do. I think you do that with balance and everything like that."

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While that sounds ideal, being unpredictable is hard to do. The offensive coordinator explained that keeping opposing defenses on their toes requires a lot more than just mixing up pass plays with rushing ones. 

"Balance is not just run and pass," he explained. "It’s getting all five – you have five eligible receivers on every play – getting all five of those guys. That to me is what true balance is, using all five of those guys in the run game or pass game. So, guys that are able to do different things, it gives you more options of how you can use them and more things that the defense has to defend."

Outside of wide receiver Terry McLaurin, plenty of Washington's offensive weapons remain unproven at the NFL level. However, there's still plenty of optimism in Redskins Park about the team's skill position depth.

The Redskins had a pair of rookie pass-catchers emerge towards the end of last season, Steven Sims and Kelvin Harmon, and having another season alongside Dwayne Haskins should only help them. At running back, Adrian Peterson keeps chugging along, and if Derrius Guice can stay healthy, he has the chance to make a huge impact, too. 

Washington's offseason additions of McKissic, Gibson, and fourth-round pick Antonio Gandy-Golden, who the offensive coordinator specifically praised, all give Turner plenty of flexibility to be creative with the unit.

"We have guys that we feel like can fit those molds as far as just creatively getting the ball, not just like running back and receiver and we’re going to give a lot of people a chance and see how it shakes out," Turner said.

Too often last season, Washington's offense was extremely predictable, especially once interim head coach Bill Callahan took over. Callahan insisted on running the ball early and often; the Redskins ran the ball 58% of the time on first down, the sixth-highest rate in the league, according to Sharp Football Stats.

Many of these runs were unsuccessful, leaving Washington in plenty of third-and-long situations. Those down-and-distance situations are immensely hard to convert, but even more difficult with a rookie quarterback, which the Redskins had with Haskins last season.

There's only room for improvement for the Redskins offense as Turner enters his first season as the team's offensive coordinator. The unit averaged just 16.6 points per game a season ago, which ranked dead last in the NFL. Washington averaged just 274 yards of total offense per contest in 2019, good for 31st in the league, with only the Jets trailing them.

This season marks the first true offensive coordinator gig that Turner has had; he was promoted to the role in Carolina last December, ironically after Rivera was fired. With the Panthers, Turner had the luxury of running back Christian McCaffrey -- arguably the most versatile offensive player in the NFL -- to his disposal, as well as guys who can play multiple roles like Curtis Samuel and D.J. Moore.

While the Redskins may not have a player like McCaffrey, the offensive coordinator has a plan for how he envisions Washington's offense to succeed in 2020, and it all starts with having players who can do multiple things.

"Versatility is so important because it’s uncertainty for the other side of the ball," Turner said.

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Ex-Washington GM believes Dan Snyder will use name change as a 'chip' to build stadium bigger than Cowboys'

Ex-Washington GM believes Dan Snyder will use name change as a 'chip' to build stadium bigger than Cowboys'

After receiving immense public pressure from major sponsors earlier this month, Washington announced in a statement on Monday that the team would retire the name 'Redskins' and its logo. The change was likely not one owner Dan Snyder wanted to make, as he stated in 2013 that the team would "never" change its name.

However, former Washington GM Vinny Cerrato believes there might have been another reason Snyder agreed to finally move on from the name.

In an interview on ESPN's 'Golic and Wingo,' Cerrato explained that he believes Snyder will try and use the name change as a "chip" to eventually build a new stadium in Washington, D.C., one "bigger and better" than his good friend Jerry Jones' 100,000-seater in Dallas.

"Ever since Jerry [Jones] built his stadium...we're playing the Cowboys, and we flew down and had dinner in Jerry's box," Cerrato said. "Jerry gave us a tour of the stadium, he's pushing the button opening and closing the roof. Ever since then, [Snyder said] 'I'm going to have one bigger and better.'"

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Cerrato said that now that the name has been retired, Snyder will be able to turn his dream stadium into a reality.

"Trust me when I tell you this, Dan will have one bigger and better," Cerrato said. "He'll use it as a chip to get that land where RFK was, to change the name. I would bet that it's somewhere involved in there. The name change is also probably helping him get the property he really wants."

RELATED: THEISMANN HOPES WASHINGTON CAN BE AN EXAMPLE OF ACTING ON SOCIAL CHANGE

Prior to the name change, it's been no secret that the owner wants a new stadium, specifically one in downtown Washington at the team's old RFK site. However, the process of building a new stadium may not be so easy.

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser said in June that she believes the name must be changed and that the team won't be allowed to build a new stadium in D.C. until that happens. Even after Washington's statement earlier this week, Mayor Bowser said there are still plenty of hurdles that remain for Washington to build a new stadium at the old RFK location.

Washington's current lease as FedEx Field in Landover, Md., is set to expire at the end of the 2027 season.

Only time will tell if the name change ends up helping Snyder build his "bigger and better" stadium in D.C. Despite that, Cerrato believes the owner will look back on the name change and wonder why he took so long to make it.

"For where we are at in society, I think it was an absolute that needed to be done. I think he realized that," Cerrato said. "His business partners, Dwight [Schar], Rob Rothman and Fred Smith, they tried to push upon on him recently. So I think it was something that needed to be done. In five years when Dan thinks back about it, he'll probably think 'Why did I wait so long?"

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Joe Theismann hopes Washington can serve as example of taking action on social change

Joe Theismann hopes Washington can serve as example of taking action on social change

Following the killing of George Floyd on May 25, the fight for social justice and racial equality has been at the forefront of issues in the United States.

The current social justice movement in America has impacted Washington's NFL team, as the organization announced on Monday it would retire the name 'Redskins' -- a slur that some Native Americans find offensive and racist -- and the team's logo. The change -- something Washington owner Dan Snyder said he would "never" do in 2013 -- is felt to be overdue by many.

Former Washington quarterback Joe Theismann hopes that the team's eventual name change can be used as an opportunity for the organization to serve as an example by taking action for social change.

"I think that what we've proven with the new name of the Washington football franchise is that we need people to take action on the things that they want to get done," Theismann told ABC7's Scott Abraham.

"There's so many things socially that people talk about doing... but we're not really getting the results. In this case, I hope the Washington name and the change that's taking place can be an example to people."

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Additionally, the Super Bowl-winning QB explained that he wants those upset by the change to understand that things don't say the same. Sometimes, change is necessary.

"Things are always changing in one place, in one way or another," Theismann said. "We're experiencing this now through the pandemic and all the things that are happening socially around the country and really around the world. And I think what we have to do is listen, open our hearts, open our minds to what's going on."

Asked if he was upset or angry by the change, Theismann said that he doesn't have any regrets personally with the franchise.

"I don't have any regrets... I was very proud to put on that uniform and represent, what I felt like were the Native Americans," Theismann said. "As a matter of fact, in 1982 when we won the World Championship, I was given a chief's headdress by one of the tribal individuals. And it's a cherished item."

Plus, the quarterback also stated he would continue to wear his 'Redskins' gear, saying  he will "explain to people, to me it represented a proud tradition of the people that I spoke to who were Native Americans."

RELATED: FORMER WASHINGTON KICKER MARK MOSELEY UPSET BY NAME CHANGE

However, Theismann made sure to emphasize he is fully embracing the change and the current social movement.

"I think it's a time to get excited," Theismann said. "Let's embrace what's here in front of us, let's embrace this young group of guys."

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