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The XFL is coming back in 2020, prepare yourself

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The XFL is coming back in 2020, prepare yourself

STAMFORD, Conn.  -- The XFL is no longer an ex-football league.

The sexed-up, second-rate football league formed as the early 2000s brainchild of WWE ringleader Vince McMahon is set for a surprising second life in 2020. The league that spawned "He Hate Me" and placed TV cameras in the bathroom flamed out in 2001 after one wild season. Interest in the league was reignited when ESPN aired the "This Was the XFL" documentary that chronicled the spectacular football failure.

McMahon is back in charge, pumping $100 million into the XFL through his new private entity, Alpha Entertainment.

"I've always wanted to bring it back," the 72-year-old McMahon said on Thursday. "I think the most important thing that we learned with the older XFL and now the new XFL is the quality of play. We have two years now to really get it right."

McMahon, who will continue as chairman and CEO of WWE, offered few other details about the football comeback. The XFL will launch with eight teams, 40-man active rosters and a 10-week regular-season schedule. McMahon said the schedule, designed to fill the seven-month gap without the NFL, could begin as early as the end of January. No cities or TV partners were named.

The league will own the eight teams.

The original XFL was founded by the wrestling company and jointly owned by NBC, and opened to massive TV ratings. But the audience did not stick around on Saturday nights to watch bad football, lascivious cheerleader shots, sophomoric double entendres and other gimmicks that saw ratings plummet and quickly doomed the league.

The XFL in 2001 had eight teams, mostly in major markets, such as Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco. McMahon said the selection of cities in the new XFL will be announced in the next few months, and a mix of major and mid-major markets will be considered.

The XFL postseason will have two semifinal games and a championship game. XFL salaries have yet to be decided, though players will be paid more to win. He wants a 2-hour game and even tossed out the idea of eliminating halftime.

"We will present a shorter, faster-paced, family-friendly and easier to understand game," McMahon said. "It's still football. But it's professional football reimagined."

This could be a gimmick-free XFL, perhaps without nicknames such as Rod Smart's "He Hate Me" stitched on the back of his uniform.

McMahon said the XFL did not want players with a criminal record and even a DUI would exclude an athlete from a contract. McMahon wanted his players to stand for the national anthem, though stopped short of saying it was mandatory.

"As far as our league is concerned, it will have nothing to do with politics," McMahon said. "And nothing to do with social issues, either. We're there to play football."

The XFL and WWE will have no crossover, unlike the first incarnation when wrestling announcers and personalities such as former Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura dominated the football telecast.

McMahon promised a safer football league, though he again offered no specifics for a league that unveiled a human coin toss the first time around -- players scrambled from each team to grab the football to decide possession. One player separated his shoulder fighting for the ball.

"We're going to listen to medical experts and heed their advice," McMahon said.

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Joe Gibbs celebrated his Daytona 500 win at Steak 'n Shake and it was awesome

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@JoeGibbsRacing

Joe Gibbs celebrated his Daytona 500 win at Steak 'n Shake and it was awesome

Joe Gibbs and his team celebrated their Sunday Daytona 500 win in the coolest (and most delicious) way possible: bringing their silver-plated, 54-pound trophy into a Steak 'n Shake.

No, we're not kidding.

As if three Super Bowls with the 'Skins wasn't enough, it looks like this man just can't stop winning.

The fast food tradition started back in 1993, after Joe Gibbs Racing won that edition of the Daytona 500. But this victory was extra special. 

JGR's victory and 1-2-3 sweep at the podium honored Gibbs' son, J.D., who died just last month of a degenerative neurological disease. It was Joe's first win since the passing of his son. 

J.D. had been involved with Joe Gibbs Racing since its start in 1991, participating as both a crew member and driver. Team members held up a banner throughout lap 11, commemorating his jersey number when he played for the William & Mary football team. 

And before heading off to Steak 'n Shake to party, Gibbs gave an emotional post-race interview that is absolutely worth your time: 

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Derrius Guice provides an update on his rehab and says he's still 'strong as an ox'

Derrius Guice provides an update on his rehab and says he's still 'strong as an ox'

It has been a little more than six months since Derrius Guice's rookie season ended on his sixth carry of the Redskins' preseason opener. So, how's the running back's rehab from his torn ACL going?

Well, conveniently enough, Guice chronicled his comeback in a "Derrius Diary" post on his team's website, giving a first person account of how his offseason is progressing.

In that blog, No. 29 first explained how the infections that stemmed from his surgery — infections that set him back two months — really made him question why he was facing so much adversity so early into his career.

"I had to play catch-up, so I had to work a lot harder and spend a lot more hours here, getting rehab in the weight room, catching up on my running and stuff," Guice said. "It was tough, when I already started over in August, and then I had to start over again in December. It was kind of like, what’s going on?"

Once he got past those troubles, though, the 'Skins' 2018 second-rounder has largely been a fixture at the franchise's Ashburn facility. That constant work has helped him get back to full strength in his arms and put him in a place where he's able to sprint at 100-percent in a straight line.

Guice wrote that he's not doing any lateral movements at full speed yet and he still wants to keep building up his legs, but with more than five months until training camp, he's got the time to do so. 

"We're right there," he said. "We just take it week to week. I’m still strong as an ox. We’re getting it back." 

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