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San Francisco gets ready for Giants' parade

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San Francisco gets ready for Giants' parade

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) For the second time in three years, San Francisco is gearing up for a ticker-tape parade to celebrate a World Series victory for the Giants.

Plans for the Wednesday bash were being made as the city cleaned up after a rowdy celebration Sunday night turned violent in some neighborhoods and police arrested three dozen people.

``I'm not going to let the spirit of this city be destroyed by 36 people,'' Mayor Ed Lee said. ``We're going to move forward with a great parade, a wonderful celebration.''

The parade will take a slightly different route from the one that followed the Giants' 2010 championship. Instead of the financial district, it will start at the foot of Market Street.

The new route is safer and affords better views than the previous route, which followed a path taken in 1958 to introduce the Giants to San Francisco after their move from New York, Mayor's Office spokesman Francis Tsang said.

``A lot has changed since then,'' he added.

Regardless of the route, hundreds of thousands of fans are expected to turn out and rival the crowd that celebrated in 2010, when players, coaches and other luminaries rode in open-air buses designed to look like cable cars and vintage convertible cars.

Tens of thousands of people crowded into a park across the street from City Hall at the end of that parade to hear players, coaches and executives thank fans for their support.

This year, the parade occurs on Halloween, a historically notorious night for San Francisco, with landmarks such as Coit Tower and City Hall bathed in orange and black light.

In previous years, hundreds of thousands of revelers descended on the Castro neighborhood, and authorities struggled to control the crowds. After a shooting in 2006 wounded nine people, officials canceled the party and the night is now marked by a heavy police presence.

As some city workers were busy Monday erecting VIP stands in front of City Hall, others were sweeping up broken glass and charred debris left behind in the Mission District and other neighborhoods where the revelry turned violent after midnight.

The Police Department arrested 36 people, the majority in the Mission. Two were taken into custody on gun charges.

However, Sgt. Michael Andraychak said the vast majority of celebrations throughout the city, from the gay mecca of the Castro to touristy North Beach, were rowdy but peaceful. Fans doused each other with beer and champagne and danced in the streets, blocking motorists who happily honked their horns in celebration while stuck in gridlock.

``There were celebrations all over the city, and they were all peaceful and upbeat,'' Andraychak said. ``Unfortunately, as the night progressed, this other element emerged and was intent on doing violence.''

Bonfires of trash were lit in several intersections, and a $700,000 public transit bus was torched. Windows were broken out of several businesses and vehicles, including a news van.

Firefighters needed a police escort to douse a bonfire near the Giants' ball park. They also fought fires fueled by couches, news racks and other debris.

Police said a damage report was not yet available.

Police said most of the violence and damage occurred several hours after the last pitch and miles from Civic Center, where an estimated 10,000 peaceful fans watched the game on a giant Jumbotron television hastily erected by the city.

Mayor Lee said fans who watched the Giants endure six elimination games in the first two rounds of the playoffs before winning the World Series in four games ``have a right to release that energy in a positive way.''

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Staff writer Terry Collins in San Francisco contributed to this report.

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That time new Wizard Troy Brown dunked on No. 2 overall pick Marvin Bagley

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That time new Wizard Troy Brown dunked on No. 2 overall pick Marvin Bagley

Back in high school, the newest Washington Wizard Troy Brown was an athletic freak. So much so that Brown dunked over the No. 2 pick of the 2018 NBA Draft, Marvin Bagley III.

Playing at Centennial High School from Las Vegas, Nevada, the 15th overall pick went straight at the dominating 6-11 Bagley and posterized the man.

Now from the other side: 

Although both were merely kids at the time (an each a few inches shorter), still you cannot question the confidence and athleticism of the Wizards' top pick. 

Heck, Brown is still athletic.

Now Oregon never got the chance to play Duke this past season, but Brown will get two chances for another poster on his wall with Bagley now on the Sacramento Kings. 

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Now the Islanders' coach, Barry Trotz explains why he left the Capitals

Now the Islanders' coach, Barry Trotz explains why he left the Capitals

DALLAS — Hours after being named head coach of the New York Islanders on Thursday, Barry Trotz made his first public comments since stepping down in Washington earlier in the week.

And, from the sounds of it, his departure was mostly a business decision.

“Yeah, obviously, I love the D.C. area,” he told reporters on a conference call. “But when it came to the business aspect, from my standpoint, I felt that it wasn’t really sincere [given] what we did together. So I decided that it was better to just move on.”

“I thank the fans,” he added. “I’m glad we could get it done. I said we could get it done in four years, and we did.”

Although the value of his contract with the Islanders has not been publicly disclosed, Hockey Night in Canada’s Elliotte Friedman reported that Trotz is set to earn “at least $4 million” per year—or more than twice what he was earning in Washington.

A source told NBC Sports Washington earlier this week that Trotz, who directed the Caps to their first Stanley Cup two weeks ago, sought $5 million per season for five seasons. The five-year term, that source said, was a non-starter as far as the Caps were concerned, given the relatively short shelf life of NHL coaches and the fact that Trotz had already been in Washington for four seasons.

When it became clear that the sides weren’t going to close the considerable gap between their positions, Trotz offered to step down and the resignation was accepted, making the 55-year-old a free agent.

When “I got the [counteroffer], I guess I knew it was time to go in a different direction,” he said.

In New York, Trotz replaces Doug Weight, who was fired earlier this month along with GM Garth Snow. Lou Lamoriello, a longtime NHL executive, took over for Snow and immediately started a search for a new head coach.

Once Trotz became available, it didn’t take Lamoriello to zero in on the NHL's fifth all-time winningest coach. The two met, exchanged ideas and quickly realized that they had found a good fit in one another. Trotz said he's already reached out to the Islanders' star captain, John Tavares, who could become the biggest prize on the free agent market on July 1. 

And, like that, Trotz now is the coach of a Metropolitan Division foe. The Caps and Isles will face off four times next season, beginning with a Nov. 26meeting in New York.

It’ll be weird, for sure. But professional sports is a business. And all sides involved in the Trotz saga were served a painful reminder of that this week.

Asked if he felt wanted in Washington, Trotz said: “Well, I’ll leave that up to the Caps to answer that. I think, absolutely. We just won a cup together and so I don't think that was an issue. I think it was more principle.”

In the end, Trotz wanted to be compensated like one of the top coaches in the game. And now he will, settling in behind big market coaches such as Toronto’s Mike Babcock ($6.25 million per year), Chicago’s Joel Quenneville ($6 million) and Montreal’s Claude Julien ($5 million).

“It’s good to be wanted,” he said. “It happened really quickly because you go from one emotion of winning the cup to the next emotion of leaving the team that you just won the Cup with, and you have to make some quick decisions. I know the timing of it—end of the season, the draft coming up, free agency [and] all that—there was some urgency on that. Both parties knew that, so we went to work at it and got it done.”

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