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Sandusky headed to prison, but scandal persists

Sandusky headed to prison, but scandal persists

BELLEFONTE, Pa. (AP) Headed to prison for the rest of his life, Jerry Sandusky leaves behind a trail of human and legal wreckage that could take years to clear away.

Victims face a lifetime of healing. Penn State is laboring under severe NCAA penalties. And at least four civil lawsuits have been filed against a university shamed by scandal, with more likely to come.

If Sandusky felt any remorse or pity for anyone but himself, he didn't show it at his sentencing Tuesday. Instead, speaking in court for the first time since his arrest last November, the former Penn State assistant football coach delivered a disjointed and defiant monologue in which he denied committing ``disgusting acts'' against children and cast himself as the victim.

Sitting behind him were the actual victims - the young men who testified that Sandusky serially molested them when they were children, using his position of influence and authority to gain their trust and then violate their innocence.

``I am troubled with flashbacks of his naked body, something that will never be erased from my memory,'' said a victim who was 13 when Sandusky lured him into a Penn State shower and forced him to touch the ex-coach. Another victim told Sandusky he suffered from ``deep painful wounds that you caused and had been buried in the garden of my heart for many years.''

Sandusky, 68, was sentenced to at least 30 years in prison for sexually abusing 10 boys, a scandal that brought disgrace to Penn State and triggered the downfall of his former boss, Hall of Fame coach Joe Paterno.

While the criminal case against Sandusky is over, the fallout will persist. With Penn State facing enormous civil liability, the university has said it wants to ``privately, expeditiously and fairly'' settle with Sandusky's victims.

Ben Andreozzi, an attorney for one of them, said Tuesday the university will need to do more: ``It's important they understand before we get into serious discussions about money, that there are other, noneconomic issues. We need apologies. We need changes in policy. This isn't just about money.''

An investigation commissioned by Penn State and led by former FBI Director Louis Freeh concluded that Paterno and other top officials covered up allegations against Sandusky for more than a decade to avoid bad publicity.

After the report came out last summer, the NCAA fined Penn State a record $60 million, barred the football team from postseason play for four years, cut the number of scholarships it can award, and erased 14 years of victories for Paterno, stripping him of his standing as the winningest coach in the history of big-time college football.

Two university administrators, Gary Schultz and Tim Curley, are awaiting trial in January on charges they failed to properly report suspicions about Sandusky and lied to the grand jury that investigated him.

Given the chance to speak before learning his sentence, Sandusky chose to focus on himself.

``In my heart I did not do these alleged disgusting acts,'' he said.

He described instances in which he helped children and did good works in the community, adding: ``I've forgiven, I've been forgiven. I've comforted others, I've been comforted. I've been kissed by dogs, I've been bit by dogs. I've conformed, I've also been different. I've been me. I've been loved, I've been hated.''

About the only thing that didn't come out of his mouth was an apology. Mental health professionals say it's not unusual for sex offenders to avoid taking responsibility, either in a bid to get out of legal trouble or because they're in psychological denial. Prosecutor Joe McGettigan dismissed Sandusky's comments as ``a masterpiece of banal self-delusion, completely untethered from reality.''

Sandusky had easy access to children through The Second Mile, the charity for troubled youths he founded in the 1970s. One question left unanswered is how many more possible victims have come forward since Sandusky's arrest last November - and how many have kept quiet.

Mitchell Garabedian, a Boston attorney who represents a 40-year-old man who says he was molested by Sandusky as a 16-year-old high school football player, said he believes Sandusky's pedophilia goes back decades, and urged the attorney general's office to consider another criminal prosecution.

``In all probability, he sexually molested hundreds of children over the course of decades,'' Garabedian said. ``He was cunning, clever and conniving.''

A spokesman for state Attorney General Linda Kelly declined comment on whether Sandusky could face additional charges, citing an ongoing grand jury investigation. But the statute of limitations would likely bar prosecutors from going after Sandusky for older crimes. Current Pennsylvania law allows them to file charges until a child victim's 50th birthday - but only for cases involving victims born Aug. 27, 1984 or later.

With Sandusky's lawyers preparing an appeal of his conviction and sentence, it might be wise for prosecutors to line up additional alleged victims - but only if they are willing to go through a high-profile trial, said Kristen Houser of the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape.

``This case looks like it's over as of today, but you never know where things will take a turn,'' she said.

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Associated Press writers Genaro C. Armas in Bellefonte and Maryclaire Dale in Philadelphia contributed to this story.

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3 stars of the game: Burakovsky's big night propels Caps to the Stanley Cup Final

3 stars of the game: Burakovsky's big night propels Caps to the Stanley Cup Final

For just the second time in franchise history, the Capitals are Eastern Conference Champions. They will play the Vegas Golden Knights in the Stanley Cup FInal after a dominant 4-0 win over the Tampa Bay Lightning in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Final.

Alex Ovechkin gave the Capitals the lead just 62 seconds into the game. It was a lead they would never relinquish as Braden Holtby recorded his second consecutive shutout.

Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final will be Monday in Las Vegas.

Here are the three stars of the game.

1. Andre Burakovsky: It's been a rough year for Burakovsky, but all that was erased on Wednesday with his brilliant two-goal performance to lead the Caps.

The Caps were clinging to a 1-0 lead in the second period, but the Lightning were buzzing, outshooting the Caps 8-1. They had all the momentum until Burakovsky stole a bouncing puck from Dan Girardi and fired a quick shot far-side for the beautiful goal.

Burakovsky added a second goal later in the second as John Carlson banked a pass off the boards to launch him on a breakaway. Burakovsky coolly shot it through the open five-hole of Vasilevskiy to make it 3-0.

It's incredible to think that Burakovsky had not recorded a point yet this postseason prior to Game 7, was a healthy scratch for Game 5 and was talking about seeing a sports psychologist over the summer after the morning skate for Game 6.

2. Braden Holtby: The goaltending for much of the series was Andrei Vasilevskiy who led Tampa Bay's comeback in the series with his phenomenal netminding. He was outplayed in the most important games by Holtby, however, who recorded shutouts in both Game 6 and Game 7. The last goal the Lightning scored in the series came 33 seconds into the second period of Game 5. That's 139:27 of continuous play and 60 straight saves for Holtby.

Holtby was phenomenal in Game 7 with big save after big save as the Lightning pushed to tie. His biggest save came in the second period when he denied Alex Killorn on the breakaway. The score was just 2-0 at that point.

This marks just the fifth time a goalie has recorded a shutout in Game 6 and Game 7 in a playoff series.

3. Alex Ovechkin: It took Ovechkin just 62 seconds to put the Capitals ahead and it turned out to be the goal that sent Washington to the Stanley Cup Final. How fitting for it to be Ovechkin to score the game-winner?

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Referees miss blatant boarding by Paquette on Orpik

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Referees miss blatant boarding by Paquette on Orpik

A rough hit to the back of Brooks Orpik left him down on the ice and slow to get up. Cedric Paquette skated back to his bench and waited for the trainer to attend to Orpik and (probably) for the referees to call his number and send him to the box.

The penalty, however, never came.

You always hear in hockey that if you can see a player's numbers, you should pull up on the hit.

What that refers to is the numbers on the back of a player's jersey. You are not allowed to hit a player directly in the back into the boards.

The official definition of boarding according to the NHL rule book is, "any player who checks or pushes a defenseless opponent in such a manner that causes the opponent to hit or impact the boards violently or dangerously." Hitting a player "in the numbers" is a defenseless position.

Apparently Cedric Paquette didn't know that and, unfortunately for the Capitals, neither did the referees.

Someone explain to me how this is not a boarding penalty:

Sometimes referees are put in a tough position because a player turns his back right before they take the hit, thus putting themselves in a vulnerable position to draw a penalty. That was not the case here. Orpik never turned.

When Tom Wilson hit Pittsburgh Penguins forward Zach Aston-Reese in the second period, the hockey world spent the next day debating whether it was an illegal hit. There is no debate here, no grey area. Just a clear board.

And no call.

You can understand referees wanting to put away the whistles for a Game 7, but you have to call the blatant dangerous plays like this. This was a bad miss by the referees, plain and simple.

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