Nationals

Subway Series ends in dramatic fashion

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Subway Series ends in dramatic fashion

From Comcast SportsNet
NEW YORK (AP) -- Russell Martin and the homer-happy New York Yankees appeared a little out of practice when it came to celebrating a game-winning homer. Martin led off the ninth with his second homer of the game and the New York Yankees took advantage of some shoddy infield defense to beat the Mets 5-4 Sunday for a three-game sweep. The catcher rounded third as a sold out Yankee Stadium roared and jogged toward his joyous teammates waiting at the plate. He took a big hop and fell as he landed on the plate and grabbed his leg, putting a momentary stop to the bouncing party. "I tried to jump in the air to celebrate, and I got about 2 inches off the ground," Martin said. "But I still managed to touch home plate and it feels good." Martin's fall might've given his teammates a sudden reminder of what happened to Kendrys Morales. The Los Angeles Angels star broke his leg hopping on home plate during a walk-off win in May 2010 and missed almost two seasons. "I worried, yes," manager Joe Girardi said. "I saw him go down a little bit, but someone pulled him up and he walked quickly, so my worries went away." The homer on a full-count pitch off Jon Rauch (3-6) was the Yankees' first walk-off homer since Sept. 8, 2010. The Yankees took advantage of errors by David Wright and Omar Quintanilla to rally from a 3-0 deficit and take a 4-3 lead in the eighth on a single by Alex Rodriguez. But Rafael Soriano blew his first save since he started finishing games when Mariano Rivera was lost to season-ending knee injury. Soriano gave up a tying double in the ninth to slumping Mets first baseman Ike Davis, a defensive replacement in the eighth. He got some help keeping it tied 4-all from shortstop Jayson Nix, who threw to third to get the lead runner on a grounder by Quintanilla. "Any play he makes that's a heads-up play doesn't surprise me," Girardi said, "because he's been around the game and understands what he needs to do." Boone Logan (1-0) got two outs with runners on first and third for the win. The Yankees are 7-2 in June. The Yankees hit eight long balls in their first Subway Series sweep of the Mets in the Bronx since 2003 -- that series included a fourth, makeup game that was played at Shea Stadium as part of a two-stadium doubleheader. It was their first win in their last at-bat against the Mets since June 12, 2009, when Luis Castillo dropped Rodriguez's potential game-ending popup, allowing two runs to score. The Mets took a 3-0 lead against Andy Pettitte in the second inning with help from second baseman Robinson Cano's fielding error and Jonathon Niese pitched repeatedly out of trouble for much of the day to make it stand up for seven innings. "Definitely a tough one, the way Jon Niese threw the ball," Wright said. Pettitte gave the Yankees a scare in the sixth when he snared Scott Hairston's comebacker with his bare hand and threw him out. Girardi and trainer Steve Donohue raced out to the mound and after several minutes of deliberation and a few practice pitches, Pettitte remained. He retired the side in order then was greeted by a pat on the shoulder by Derek Jeter at the dugout. His left hand bandaged heavily, Pettitte said he'll be able to make his next start, which is scheduled to come after he turns 40 on June 15. X-rays of the hand were negative. "He's got an extra day here. So he should be OK," Girardi said. Girardi said Hiroki Kuroda will make his next scheduled start after he was hit on the foot by a sharp grounder Friday night. Trailing 3-0, in the seventh, Martin hit a two-run drive off the top of the wall in right field after Wright's throwing error extended the seventh inning. Many of the 49, 010 -- the third straight sellout -- paused to wait and see if the leaping Hairston caught the ball. "That was hard to take," Hairston said. "Guess a lot of those things happen in this ballpark." Martin, who was hitting .173 entering play May 25 has four homers in his past six games and 10 RBIs. He's raised his average to .216. "I'm starting to feel pretty comfortable at the plate," Martin said. "I made a couple of adjustments and, hopefully, I'll just keep doing what I've been doing now." Jeter led off the eighth with a slow hopper that went under Qunitanilla's glove and rolled into the outfield. Jeter was given a single and he hustled into second base with a headfirst dive on the error. Curtis Granderson then hit his second opposite field single of the game to left, off Bobby Parnell, to put runners on first and third. Mark Teixeira followed with a tying hit a day after he gave the Yankees the lead with a two-run homer. The Mets scored more than three runs against the Yankees for the first time in 11 games and for the first time in their past five games this season, but have lost six of seven overall. Making his 51st interleague start, matching Livan Hernandez for most all time, Pettitte raced through the top of the Mets order with only seven pitches in the first. He then needed 36 pitches in the second as the Mets scored three runs. He gave up three runs -- two earned -- and struck out eight in six innings. The Yankees put the leadoff batter on against Niese five times in seven innings but came up empty until the seventh. The Yankees hit into three double plays to help quash threats. Given an extra day of rest after leaving his most recent start with an accelerated heart rate, Niese appeared to get out of seventh inning when Andruw Jones hit a grounder to Wright. Wright spun and made the throw into the dirt. Martin followed with his homer. His home run in the ninth was the third walk-off homer of his career. NOTES: The Yankees reinstated pitcher Freddy Garcia from the bereavement list and sent Ryota Igarashi to Triple-A Scranton-WilkesBarre. ... Jeter has grounded into 11 double plays this season. He had 10 all last year. ... Rodriguez moved past Eddie Murray for seventh on the career RBIs list with 1,918.

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Astros’ arrogance on domestic violence an unseemly start to World Series

Astros’ arrogance on domestic violence an unseemly start to World Series

At some point during the World Series this week against the Nationals, Houston Astros pitcher Roberto Osuna will step out of the bullpen and take the mound in a big situation.

A top-flight closer with 38 saves and an 2.43 ERA, Osuna is only in Houston because the Astros were willing to deal with the optics of acquiring an accused domestic abuser while he was suspended 75 games by Major League Baseball in 2018 for violating the league’s Joint Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Child Abuse policy.

They traded a struggling relief pitcher and two minor-league pitchers to the Toronto Blue Jays and got an elite talent in return. Now, the butcher’s bill has come due and the organization is refusing to pay the price.  

Sports Illustrated reporter Stephanie Apstein reported Monday night that during the locker room celebration after Houston clinched the American League pennant on Saturday, assistant general manager Brandon Taubman repeatedly yelled in the direction of three reporters, all women, his profane support of Osuna.

What an odd thing to do. Taubman knows Osuna’s history, he knows how controversial that trade was at the time. To the reporters who witnessed the outburst it seemed “shocking” Apstein told the Washington Post in a phone interview.   

Osuna had almost just blown Houston’s season when he allowed a two-run home run in the top of the ninth inning against the Yankees in Game 6. If New York rallied to win, there was to be a winner-take-all Game 7 on Sunday. That didn’t happen thanks to Jose Altuve’s game-ending two-run homer in the bottom of the ninth. 

“Thank God we got Osuna! I’m so [expletive] glad we got Osuna,” Apstein quoted Taubman shouting in her story. She was one of the three reporters he was allegedly talking to. 

That’s where the story really goes off the rails. Apstein was going to write about the incident and said she wanted to talk to Taubman. An Astros media relations staffer denied the request, Apstein said. She wrote it anyway. 

Late Monday, Houston put out a statement calling the story “misleading and completely irresponsible” and chastising Apstein for an “attempt to fabricate a story where one does not exist.”

In the Astros’ version, Taubman was simply voicing his support for Osuna as he answered questions after a rough game and not directing his comments at any reporters. 

Except reporters from other outlets disputed that version immediately. Houston Chronicle reporter Hunter Atkins tweeted that he witnessed the exchange. So did Yahoo baseball writer Hannah Keyser. Osuna wasn’t answering questions in the immediate area, according to a witness quoted by the Chronicle. And Taubman did seem to be making a point yelling at the reporters, one of whom wore a bracelet in support of domestic violence awareness, according to the Sports Illustrated story.   

So the team would not make Taubman available to clarify any misunderstanding and then called the reporter a liar. The organization went radio silent until Tuesday afternoon. On a day the Astros should have been focused on Game 1 of the World Series against the Nats, they spent the morning trying to put out a fire they ignited. It did not go well. 

Official statements released by the organization were a cliché of the genre. Taubman was “deeply sorry and embarrassed” but still claims it was all misinterpreted. He is “a loving husband and father.” He is a “progressive and charitable member of the community.” And yet…”I am sorry if anyone was offended by my actions.”

Demi Lovato thinks that was a good statement. Sorry. Not sorry. Have we checked all the boxes? Refuse to clarify on the record when given the chance. Call the reporter a liar. Wait until the story creates an uproar and then hide like a coward behind a non-statement that clings to your self-appointed status as a good person and a dad. And at this point any media relations executive who puts “I am sorry if anyone was offended by my actions” into a statement should be fired on the spot. You are not helping.  

It is all so very arrogant. Lots of nominally good people do and say stupid things they should apologize for. Lots of dads and husbands are terrible people. Lots of abusers are enabled by organizations – sports teams, businesses, political administrations – who care more about winning than about what is right. 

Does everyone deserve a second chance? Sure. Osuna’s accuser, the mother of his then three-year-old son, left for her native Mexico and refused to testify against him in court in Canada. Charges were dropped there when Osuna paid a $500 peace bond. His lawyer insisted that his client was not admitting guilt.  

But that’s exactly how domestic violence works. Victims often refuse to testify in court. They are the ones being abused, after all. There had been enough evidence for MLB to give that 75-game suspension. Domestic violence isn’t a mistake or a misunderstanding and it is not something a person or a team gets to push aside because it’s inconvenient or they don’t want to talk about it. And they sure as hell don’t get to gloat about how smart they are at recognizing it as a market inefficiency. 

At least Astros manager A.J. Hinch had the ability and the sense to put the issue perspective during his pre-game press conference Tuesday. 

“No one, it doesn't matter if it's a player, a coach, a manager, any of you members of the media, should ever feel like when you come into our clubhouse that you're going to be uncomfortable or disrespected,” Hinch said. “So I wasn't there. I don't know to the extent of what happened. I read, like everybody. I haven't talked to every single person in the organization, as you would expect. I've been knee-deep in the Washington Nationals. But I think we all need to be better across the board, in the industry. I understand why it's a question today, and I appreciate it. But I was disappointed.”

If that had been Houston’s initial response, maybe this firestorm of criticism is contained. 

It is no small irony that the man who ultimately did blow Game 6 of the American League Championship Series was Yankees reliever Aroldis Chapman, a player with his own history of domestic violence. That caused heartburn when New York traded him to the Chicago Cubs in 2016 – less than a year after he was accused of choking his girlfriend and firing a gun into his garage wall eight times. 

Chapman helped the Cubs win a World Series for the first time since 1908. The Yankees were so bothered by this that they signed him to a five-year, $86 million contract that offseason. They needed a closer, you see. Too often that is all that matters. 

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Capitals debut Nationals-themed name plates in advance of World Series

Capitals debut Nationals-themed name plates in advance of World Series

The Capitals took to Twitter to share their support for their D.C. family in a unique and fun way.

Prior to Game 1 of the World Series, the Capitals decided to debut Washington Nationals-themed nameplates in their locker room.

 

The red and white nameplates displayed both team's logos. 

The two teams are pretty close. This is not the first time they have shared support for one another.

As the Nationals find themselves on a similar journey to the 2018 Capitals, players like Adam Eaton have said they draw inspiration from their counterparts.

During the NLDS series against the Dodgers, Alexander Ovechkin was in attendance to throw out the first pitch, and a little later the Nationals returned the favor.

The Nationals were invited to Capital One Arena for the game against the New York Rangers on October 18th because they had a night off. Eaton read the starting lines and ace pitcher Max Scherzer was supposed to drop the first puck but instead, threw the Washington Capitals a curveball, dropping the first baseball.

Both teams are on the road. The Nationals will face off against the Astros in Houston, Tuesday night at 8:08 p.m. while the Capitals take on the Flames in Calgary.

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