Dale Earnhardt Jr.

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These well-known Redskins fans would be very interesting minority stakeholders

These well-known Redskins fans would be very interesting minority stakeholders

The Redskins' three minority owners, who reportedly make up about 40-percent of the team's ownership group, are actively trying to sell their stakes in the club.

Now, if those three do in fact move on — which may prove difficult — there are plenty of well-known Washington fans who could prove to be interesting replacements, even if they purchase just a small slice of what the trio is looking to pass on. 

Check out the list below for a handful of the more eye-catching names that would absolutely draw headlines. 

Dale Earnhardt Jr.

One of NASCAR's most popular drivers of all time is now working as an analyst for NBC. He's been a fan since he was nine years old and has a positive relationship with Dan Snyder. Plus, he's already used to pressure-packed Sundays.

Matthew McConaughey

Here's another mega-celebrity and lifelong fan of the Burgundy and Gold who's also a personal friend of Snyder's. Perhaps he'd like to add some football hardware to his already crowded trophy case.

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Kevin Durant

Durant is one of the best ballers in the world, and with how enormous NBA contracts are as well as all the endorsements he's picked up along the way, you have to figure he has some spare cash to put toward the Redskins if he wanted to.

Plus, becoming a part owner of an NFL team would be something he could hold over his enemies like Draymond Green and Kendrick Perkins.

RELATED: A NAME CHANGE SEEMS IMMINENENT

Wale

The famous rapper just hosted some of the Redskins' virtual programming during the 2020 Draft, and he's tight with QB Dwayne Haskins. He could be next in the long line of artists/musicians who've dabbled in sports ownership.

Taraji P. Henson

The Hidden Figures and Empire actress' father once worked as a janitor for Washington, and she's been a supporter of the squad for quite a while. Buying into them could be a nice thing to add to her real-life empire.

Joe Gibbs

Gibbs isn't exactly a current pop culture icon like any of the names above, but he is a DC icon and it'd be foolish to exclude him from a list like this. Snyder has understandably revered Gibbs for essentially his whole life and confided in him often in the past.

If Gibbs wanted to become involved with the Redskins again, you have to believe Snyder would be thrilled.  

Alexis Ohanian

Ohanian, who co-founded Reddit and sold it back in 2006, has been devoted to the Redskins since the late '80s. He's attended plenty of contests in his fan career. So, why not make the transition from the stadium seats to the owner's box?

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Dale Earnhardt Jr. headlines NASCAR's 2021 Hall of Fame class

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USA Today Sports Images

Dale Earnhardt Jr. headlines NASCAR's 2021 Hall of Fame class

Dale Earnhardt Jr. spent his whole life chasing meaningful rewards.

He waited longingly for a pat on the back from his famous father, worked diligently to generate compliments from crew members and other drivers and reveled in the roar of his fans -- those he inherited from his father and the new ones he brought along for the ride.

NASCAR's longtime fan favorite received the sport's biggest honor Tuesday, being selected to join his father in the series' Hall of Fame. Earnhardt will be inducted in Charlotte, North Carolina, along with the late Mike Stefanik and 87-year-old Red Farmer, who is planning to race on Talladega's dirt track this weekend. Ralph Seagraves was named the Landmark Award winner for his contributions to the sport.

Despite never winning a series championship, Earnhardt still received 76% of the votes cast on the modern era ballot.

"Just talking about it, it's really emotional because I feed off affirmation," he said wistfully. "It's such a great feeling to know people think I made an impact. I know what my numbers are and I feel like I was chosen because of that but also for the impact I made off the track, being an ambassador for the sport."

Being an Earnhardt name certainly comes with its advantages.

Junior's grandfather, Ralph, went into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1997 and was named one of the NASCAR's 50 Greatest Drivers in 1998. Junior's father, The Intimidator, also made the list and even before finishing his career with 76 wins and a record-tying seven Cup titles.

RELATED: EARNHARDT JR. TO RETURN FOR NASCAR'S XFINITY SERIES

The team-owning father even gave Dale Jr. his first big break, a full-time ride in the Busch Series in 1998. It didn't take long for Junior to prove he was a natural -- on and off the track.

He won Busch championships in each of his first two seasons, then two races as a rookie Cup driver in 2000.

But when the elder Earnhardt was killed during the 2001 Daytona 500, Junior suddenly found himself in a place he never imagined.

"I knew when dad died I was going to assume most if not all of his fan base and I feel like I took care of that," he said. "I didn't squander that, I didn't ruin that and I also introduced myself to a lot of people who never heard of Dale Earnhardt."

Suddenly, the brash 26-year-old Earnhardt emerged as the face of the sport and started adding his own chapter to the family legacy. He won 26 races before retiring as a full-time Cup driver following the 2017 season, including two Daytona 500s and the 2001 Pepsi 400, the first Cup race held at Daytona after his father's death.

Still, fans watched to see if he could replicate the fearless style that made his father so popular. Junior never tried to compete with that image.

"There was a point in my career where i started to think I'm not going to win seven championships; I might not even one. I'm not going to win 100 races; I might not even win 40," he said. "There were a lot of people that wanted me to be as successful as he was and be as aggressive as he was and spin people out or whatever. So I started to think about what I could do outside of that and what else I could do to help the sport."

Junior introduced stock-car racing to a new fans through different news outlets, social media and podcasts. The result: Fifteen consecutive Most Popular Driver awards.

While Earnhardt will be the headliner at the induction ceremony, he's impressed by his new classmates, too.

Stefanik won seven titles in NASCAR's modified series and two more in the Busch North series. The nine total victories is tied for second in series history with Richie Evans and Stefanik was named the second greatest driver in modified history in 2003.

The 61-year-old Stefanik, who died from injuries sustained in a plane crash in Connecticut last September, edged out Ricky Rudd for the second spot on the ballot with 49% of the vote.

"Phenomenal when you think about what he did. Nine championships," Kyle Petty said during NBCSN's announcement show. "Phenomenal record, phenomenal amount of wins."

Farmer, one of the three original "Alabama Gang" members with brothers Bobby and Donnie Allison, beat out Hershel McGriff by earning 71% of the vote on the pioneer ballot.

The 87-year-old Farmer won four Late Model Sportsmen season titles, an estimated 700 to 900 races and also was a member of NASCAR's 50 Greatest Drivers. He also is a member of the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 2004 and this week with the big series returning to Talladega, he's scrambling to put together a car for two nights of racing on the dirt track across the street.

"I had a little fender-bender in a 40-lapper last weekend," he said. "They had a three or four-car pile up right in front of me and I slid into it and messed up the nose pretty good. So I'm getting my backup car ready."

Seagraves helped find new sponsors, including former title sponsor Winston, as well as refurbishing tracks.

Dale Earnhardt returns; Burton wins Xfinity race at Homestead

Dale Earnhardt returns; Burton wins Xfinity race at Homestead

MIAMI (AP) -- A late caution flag gave Harrison Burton new life, and he took advantage.

Burton took the inside line on the way to the lead in the final lap, and held on to win the Xfinity Series race Saturday at Homestead-Miami Speedway -- denying, among others, Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Noah Gragson, who seemed to be in full command with seven laps remaining.

Burton, Gragson and Austin Cindric were three-wide going into that last lap, and it was Burton -- the 19-year-old son of former Cup star Jeff Burton, who wound up in front in a wild finish.

"Omg!!!!!! What a bad assss restart," Burton's mother, Kim, tweeted. "You are the damn man kid!!!! I love you."

Cindric was second and Gragson third, two spots ahead of Earnhardt -- part of his JR Motorsports ownership.

"I don't know what I was doing, either, honestly," Burton said of the three-wide fight going into that final lap. "What a race."

Burton became the youngest driver to win a series race at Homestead. Cindric, the son of Team Penske president Tim Cindric, got his fifth top-five finish of the season but is still looking for his first win of 2020.

"Lot of personal strides, but at the same point, tired of losing," said Cindric, who led 24 laps and won the second stage. "But losing in this sport means that you're close to winning."

Anthony Alfredo was fourth, his best finish in four Xfinity starts. First-stage winner Ryan Sieg finished 28th.

It was shaping up to be a runaway, with Gragson leading by more than 10 seconds before a caution came out with about seven laps remaining. But he couldn't recapture that magic on the restart, and what would have been his third win of the season quickly slipped away.

"Restarts were just the biggest struggle. ... Just couldn't get it going," Gragson said.

It was Earnhardt's third Xfinity Series appearance since retiring as a full-time Cup Series driver in 2017. He's been top-five in all three of those cameos, and was sitting second behind only Gragson when that late flag came out.

"I was rusty, all the way through," Earnhardt said.

Earnhardt was winless in 17 Cup Series starts at Homestead in his career, with only one finish better than 10th in those. He'd also raced there five times in the Xfinity Series, placing second in 1999 for his best finish.

Either way, Saturday was a memorable day for Earnhardt.

Tuesday might become considerably more memorable.

He's one of 15 nominees for the 2021 class that will go into the NASCAR Hall of Fame. The votes have been cast, with results scheduled to be revealed Tuesday afternoon. Earnhardt said he will document how he gets the call -- if he's in or not -- on his popular podcast.

"If we are chosen, we'll talk about that," Earnhardt said. "If we are not chosen, we'll talk about the ones that are and celebrate those people."

Talking on his radio while taking pace laps Saturday before the race started, Earnhardt somewhat comically revealed that he was anxious about being behind the wheel again.

"There ought to be something in the rule book to keep this from happening," Earnhardt said. "I haven't been in a race car since Darlington last year. I've got no laps. I have no idea what's going to happen. I've been nervous as hell for a week."

It didn't show. He was right there, all the way to the end.

But the day belonged to Burton, who grabbed his second victory of the season. The Xfinity cars are back on the track Sunday before the Cup Series race at Homestead. Earnhardt is not driving Sunday, insisted that Saturday's race will be his lone appearance as a driver this season, and said this appearance might have been his final one for good before he shifts to broadcasting full-time.

"We'll just see how it goes," Earnhardt said.

He's winding down. Burton is just getting started.

"I'm just ready to go again tomorrow," Burton said. "I want to get two."