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Dan Snyder's attorney raises conspiracy questions with defamation suit

Dan Snyder's attorney raises conspiracy questions with defamation suit

Washington Football Team owner Dan Snyder wants to clear the air about a series of slanderous rumors that his attorney believes were part of a wider campaign to spread misinformation and defame his character. 

"There's a lot of things going on in Washington right now regarding the club and there are people that may have some motives to falsely attack Mr. Snyder," attorney Joe Tacopina, who represents Snyder, said in an interview with NBC Sports Washington. 

The center of the issue comes from an article that ran on meaww.com - a website owned by India-based company Media Entertainment Arts WorldWide - alleging Snyder had personal involvement with financier Jeffrey Epstein, the convicted sex offender who killed himself while in prison last year. 

"Dan Snyder has nothing to do with [Epstein] and had nothing to do with him," Tacopina said of the article. 

That article, shared repeatedly via social media, deeply bothered the Snyder family and now the owner wants to do everything in his power to clear his name. 

In the process, Tacopina alleges that a former employee was spreading the disinformation at the behest of a financial backer. Snyder is taking legal action against former Washington employee Mary Ellen Blair in an attempt to prove she intentionally spread lies and was told to do so by a third party. 

"We believe there are obviously people behind that had their own purposes for doing it," Tacopina said. The lawsuits aim to "to uncover who’s behind the scenes, who’s pulling the strings."

RELATED: DAN SNYDER FILES TWO DEFAMATION LAWSUITS

In a New York Times report, Blair is connected to Dwight Schar, one of the Washington minority owners looking to sell his shares in the team. The article contends that Blair dealt with financial hardships and lives in a building that Schar's daughter's real estate development company owns.

Asked if the misinformation and defamation lawsuits have anything to do with Washington's minority partners looking to sell 40 percent of the team, Tacopina would not speculate, but he did respond. 

"I think common sense will sort of play out. I think the evidence in this case will present us with who’s behind this," Tacopina said. 

Tacopina has an impressive and high-profile legal track record. He worked with Philadelphia rapper Meek Mill to end his decade-long legal saga and multiple jail visits. He also lists Alex Rodriguez and Jay-Z as clients. 

This looks to be just the beginning of a series of legal actions that could unclose a significant conspiracy against the Washington Football Team owner. Then again, it could be nothing. The legal process will play out.

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The six weeks that forever changed the Washington Football Team

The six weeks that forever changed the Washington Football Team

For the most part, the month of July is rather quiet for NFL teams. Though training camp begins toward the end, the month acts as a buffer before the news begins to intensify as the season gets underway.

The Washington Football Team's July -- and now the beginning of August -- was anything but that. The team has not played a single snap of football in 2020, and yet still dominated the news cycle for close to six weeks with off-the-field events that never seem to stop. 

The past 39 days have forever changed the franchise in Washington. Things will never truly be the same in Ashburn, Va. Here's a look at the breathtaking timeline of events that have occurred since July 1.

July 1

Owner Dan Snyder has faced pressure over the years to change the moniker that many found offensive, but his stance on the issue never really wavered. That was until the first domino fell on July 1 as a collection of 87 shareholders and investment firms asked major companies, such as Nike, FedEx and PepsiCo, to end any relationship with the team until the name was changed.

The group was worth over $600 billion, and it was clear that the movement to change the name was picking up steam like never before.

July 2

Just one day later, FedEx, which owns the naming rights to Washington's stadium, sent a formal request to the team asking for the name to be changed. FedEx Ceo Frederick Smith is also a minority owner of the team (more on him later).

It didn't end there, as Nike also removed all Washington merchandise from the team store on its website. At this point, it became clear that the companies were not making any sort of empty threats. They wanted the moniker switched, and they wanted it done quickly.

July 3

Realizing the issue was not going away, Washington announces that they will conduct a 'thorough review' of the name

In a statement Redskins owner Dan Snyder said, "This process allows the team to take into account not only the proud tradition and history of the franchise but also input from our alumni, the organization, sponsors, the National Football League and the local community it is proud to represent on and off the field."

A report then surfaced that the review essentially meant that a name change was coming. 

July 4

If a new name was to come, when would it be? That's a question many had at this time. Head coach Ron Rivera shared some insight with the Washington Post, saying that he was hoping a rebrand would come before the season began.

"We want to do this in a positive way," Rivera said.

July 6

More big names, including Target and Walmart, announced that Washington gear will no longer be available for purchase at their websites until the team changed its name. If the pressure wasn't already impacting the speed of a decision on the moniker, it was now.

July 8

Remember Frederick Smith? Here's where he comes back into play. The FedEx CEO and two other minority owners of the team -- Robert Rothman and Dwight Schar -- were reportedly trying to sell their stake in the franchise. Additionally, they tried to get Snyder to sell his majority stake.

That didn't work, and frustration only grew for the three.

Also, Amazon said it would no longer sell Washington merchandise on its website. 

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July 10

FedEx continues to demand a name change, now citing that it will remove all signage from the stadium following the 2020 NFL season if something was not done. Washington had a deal with the company through 2025. 

July 13

The day finally comes, and the name is retired -- sort of.

Washington announced that the previous moniker and logo would be more, and then proceeded to use that name and logo numerous times in the press release. 

Either way, it was a day of monumental change for the franchise.

July 14 and 15

In the days following the release, the attention quickly shifted away from the name. This was due to numerous vague teasers from D.C. area reporters implying that a "bombshell" type story was about to drop, and it wasn't going to be good.

Rumors spread like wildfire throughout social media as everyone consistently refreshed Twitter waiting for something to happen.

Longtime team broadcast Larry Michael retired almost out of nowhere at this time, leaving many wondering who was about to be exposed when the news dropped. 

July 16

The Washington Post releases a scathing report that accuses former staff members of serious allegations of sexual harassment toward female employees. Among the names involved were former personnel executives Richard Mann II and Alex Santos, who were fired a week before the news broke. Michael was also included in the claims.

Snyder was not explicitly mentioned in any of the accusations, he was still the man in power that allowed the dysfunction to exist in the organization. However, it is believed that the news will not be enough to force Snyder out of Washington

In the span of 15 days, Washington was in search of a new name and Ron Rivera was in search of a way to break away from the past problems in the organization. 

July 17

A day after the report surfaced, the NFL announced that it will 'take any action' if necessary following the conclusion of the investigation into the culture in Washington.

The team hired attorney Beth Wilkinson to conduct a "deep dive" into the organization the day prior, which raised some skepticism considering franchises typically don't get to choose the personnel for league investigations. 

On the same day, former Washington safety D.J. Swearinger shared screenshots of text messages that were allegedly between him and former head coach Jay Gruden. The messages showed Gruden using explicit and unprofessional language toward Swearinger. Compared to the larger issues, it was a relatively minor fued between two people no longer with the organization. But it did speak to the culture in place at the time. 

With so much going on in Washington, many would not be surprised if Rivera had regrets about taking the job in January. The head coach put that notion to rest explaining that he had none despite the circumstances surrounding the franchise. 

July 18

Since it was announced that the name would be changed, speculation on what that would be took over social media. Warriors and Redtails got the initial support, but Red Wolves quickly became the fan favorite - on social media anyway. Some players also showed some love for the moniker.

Despite the suggestions, Washington showed no signs of a favorite. That left Dwayne Haskins and many others wondering when a new name was coming. 

July 20

Washington hires Terry Bateman as its new executive vice president and chief marketing officer to head up the name change process. Bateman had already worked for Snyder in the past, leaving many to question if things were really going to change in Washington.

July 21

Washington hires former NBC Sports Washington anchor and reporter Julie Donaldson to lead the radio broadcast team, serve in other on-air roles and hold an executive position as senior vice president of media.  Donaldson is set to be the first woman to be a regular member of an NFL team's radio broadcast booth as the franchise takes a step in the right direction.

Former Washington player Logan Paulsen shares a story about how former team executive Bruce Allen would show players a PowerPoint to defend the team's former name.

"You'd get Bruce Allen coming in and he'd give you a presentation about how the Native American tribes, 95% of them support the name," the ex-tight end told the hosts. "You always felt like he was trying to sell you something there."

July 23

Speculation over the new name comes to a halt when the team announces it will be known as the "Washington Football Team" for the 2020 season. The temporary name change allows the team to move on from the past while also taking the time to figure out the next step in the rebrand.

Logos, jerseys and more are unveiled and social media becomes a battling ground for the two factions: Those who like the move and those who believe it was a failure by the organization to not have a new name ready. 

RELATED: RIVERA WORKING TO CHANGE CULTURE WITH ACTIONS

July 24

It is reported that the NFL is investigating Washington again. this time in relation to how recent hirings correspond to the league's "Rooney Rule". The rule requires NFL franchises to consider minority and/or female applications for executive positions within the franchise. 

The Fritz Pollard Alliance had sent inquiries to the NFL and the team regarding their hiring process after Washington announced the hiring of Bateman.

In an on-field surprise, quarterback Alex Smith is cleared for full football activities by his personal doctors, marking an incredible display of perseverance by the veteran after he suffered what many believed to be a career-ending broken leg during the 2018 season. Though he still has a ways to go, Ron Rivera isn't ready to rule out Smith being a part of the team's future plans at quarterback. 

July 25 - August 6

Name suggestions, logo ideas and photoshops flood the internet as fans debate the impending permanent name change. Red Wolves is still winning the popularity contests, but numerous other options exist and have their own levels of support.

Players begin reporting to training camp amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. For the first time in over a month, football-related storylines start to take over. Things seem a bit quiter off the field after erupting for more than three weeks. That calm would not last.  

August 7

Washington running back Derrius Guice is arrested on domestic violence charges and promptly released from the team.  

The release of Guice becomes the latest sign that Rivera is actually following through on changing the culture in Washington, and he's using actions rather than just words.

One of the most promising young players on the roster, a 2018 second-round draft pick who has struggled with injuries but showed such promise on the field late last season, was suddenly gone. In this crazy summer, it hardly matches what came before. But it's worth noting how big this story alone would be in a normal NFL offseason or training camp for most teams. 

Washington Football Team owner Dan Snyder filed defamation lawsuits in India and in Los Angeles to defend against the rumors that spread about his ownership prior to the Washington Post story being released. 

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After Friday's latest round of breaking news, and with the actual season creeping closer to its start date, deciding on the No. 1 quarterback or which wide receivers step up are the storylines expected to be covered in Washington. But, in this summer of uncertainty and change, it's probably better to just wait for the latest bombshell. If the past 39 days are any indication, with a temporary name, a new head coach, an ongoing pandemic and almost daily seismic shifts in the organization, news could break at any second. 

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Washington Football owner Dan Snyder files 2 defamation lawsuits to combat false rumors

Washington Football owner Dan Snyder files 2 defamation lawsuits to combat false rumors

Washington Football Team owner Dan Snyder has filed defamation lawsuits in India and in Los Angeles to defend against wild rumors that circulated about his ownership prior to Washington Post story last month.

In a statement from the team sent to NBC Sports Washington the legal action was explained:

In response to false and slanderous stories attributed to a paid for hire publication,  Mr. Snyder has filed a defamation action in India, and an action in Los Angeles seeking to compel discovery in the United States to uncover the person(s) involved in the placement of these stories. While Mr. Snyder understands that truthful criticism about the Washington Football Team comes with the territory of owning the team, malicious criminal allegations cross the line.  He intends to hold all of those responsible for this defamation accountable, and will donate any proceeds recovered in the lawsuit to charity.

In the Post story last month 15 women made allegations of a culture of abuse and sexual harassment inside the organization, and in the time since the club fired two personnel executives and watched longtime team broadcaster Larry Michael abruptly resign. 

According to TMZ.com:

Snyder took his battle to federal court Friday morning seeking info on a company called New Content Media, which operates the website, meaww.com. He's also filed a $10 million lawsuit in India against the parent company of the website that published the heinous stories last month.

According to docs, obtained by TMZ Sports, Snyder says meaww.com posted an article hinting that a forthcoming Washington Post story was going to expose Snyder's alleged involvement in sex trafficking.

Stay tuned for much more on this developing story. 

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