Ian Mahinmi

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Ian Mahinmi loves the bubble barbershop, says NBA fashion has changed

Ian Mahinmi loves the bubble barbershop, says NBA fashion has changed

Ian Mahinmi is a man of style with his own clothing line and a commitment to dressing fashionably every time he shows up to an NBA arena, or even the Wizards' practice facility.

So, it didn't take him long to get a lay of the land at Disney World and form his own evaluation of how to look good in the NBA bubble. As Mahinmi sees it, things are a bit dressed down, but still important if you want to be noticed for the right reasons.

"Everybody is wearing is casual, but you can notice the difference between somebody who really doesn't care and somebody who's used to caring about how he gets out of the house and everything," Mahinmi said.

Mahinmi was asked which of his teammates fell in the category of not putting much effort into their appearance. He offered up Moe Wagner.

Wagner understood why.

"It's okay. I'm from Berlin, Germany. Nobody cares how you dress. I'm very comfortable in my own skin. That's all I have to say about that," Wagner said.

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For Mahinmi, though, the barbershop the NBA provided players has stood out most. He usually keeps his hair very short, but has now grown it out to be braided. That required a trip to the barbershop soon after he arrived to get the braids redone.

Mahinmi was pleasantly surprised with what he found.

"They've got a really nice setup. Honestly, I've gotta tip my hat to the NBA because the barbershop we have at the Yacht Club, the hotel that we stay, it's really nice," he said. 

"You have two barbers, you have a lady that does braids and cornrows and all that. You have another lady that does locks. They have a nice setup, music going, good vibes. It is an enjoyable time."

Mahinmi has been down there with the Wizards for two weeks now and seems to be well-adjusted when it comes to keeping up his appearance. But what happens two weeks from now? Players could only pack so much going to live in a hotel room for five-plus weeks. It may get difficult to maintain a variety of outfits while being around the same people every day.

That's why Mahinmi, like many players, is getting packages shipped to him. They just have to wait a couple days for the items to clear the screening process due to coronavirus.

"I won't go down the list of all the things I got shipped to me because it's crazy and you will laugh," he said.

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Wizards, Mystics have discussed turning Capital One Arena into a place to vote

Wizards, Mystics have discussed turning Capital One Arena into a place to vote

With a growing list of NBA teams offering their arenas as presidential polling places for this November's election, members of the Wizards and Mystics are hoping the same can be done in Washington with Capital One Arena.

Wizards center Ian Mahinmi said there have been discussions on the matter among Wizards and Mystics players, as well as members of the front office. He mentioned several by name: Bradley Beal, Natasha Cloud, Ish Smith and LaToya Sanders, a group he described as leading the charge on using the teams' platforms to create social justice change.

"This is something that we have talked about and that would be amazing," Mahinmi said.

RELATED: MANY WIZARDS PLAYERS PLAN TO WEAR SOCIAL JUSTICE MESSAGES ON BACK OF JERSEYS

Voting rights and awareness has become a central issue for Mahinmi, who is originally from France. He has been studying social justice matters worldwide and feels voting can create necessary change in the United States. Mahinmi has been motivated, as many have, by recent events such as the death of George Floyd in the custody of police officers in Minneapolis.

"I think it's our job to provide a platform and to help the people that are lacking space and time to do and exercise their right. When you look around the country, across the country, and what's going on as far as the ability to vote, providing this for the people would be such a great move. I think it would be the right move for our organization," Mahinmi said.

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Mahinmi said recently he plans to wear the word 'vote' on the back of his Wizards jersey when NBA games return in Orlando. The league is allowing players to replace their names with nessages centered around social justice.

Clearly for Mahinmi, it's about more than a slogan. He, his teammates and his friends from the Mystics are looking to take action.

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How George Floyd changed Ian Mahinmi's perspective on advocacy and fatherhood

How George Floyd changed Ian Mahinmi's perspective on advocacy and fatherhood

Over the last month, America has been having a long-overdue conversation about race, justice and equality in our society. At NBC Sports Washington, we wanted to further the dialogue by providing a forum for DMV-area sports figures who are thought leaders on these important issues.

NBC Sports Washington is launching the first part of an ongoing video series entitled Race in America this week. Ian Mahinmi, Natasha Cloud, and Mike Locksley joined Chis Miller for the first of these roundtable discussions to share their experiences, thoughts and how they’re using their platforms in this fight. To watch the full interview, click here.

Wizards center Ian Mahinmi has been familiar with the history and horrors of racism from a very early age. With a father from Benin, Africa, he was taught about slavery as a child and in graphic detail, to the point where it numbed his views on other subjects of race relations.

He explained in honest and introspective detail on 'Race in America,' a panel hosted by NBC Sports Washington's Chris Miller that also featured Mystics guard Natasha Cloud and University of Maryland football coach Mike Locksley.

Here's what Mahinmi said:

"Me, I have such a different view, first because I'm African. You wouldn't believe the stuff that I've seen and that I was exposed to. My dad always showed me what was slavery at home. I have pictures. My dad always showed me everything. So, it wasn't the first time I saw something crazy like that happen," Mahinmi said, referring to the video of George Floyd being suffocated by a police officer in Minneapolis.

RACE IN AMERICA: WATCH THE FULL ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION HERE

"It's almost like you look back and I felt a little embarrassed of myself that it took [George Floyd's] story for me to be shocked again. It's almost like I became numb to it. It's like 'I've seen this before, it's crazy but I've seen it before.' It's like okay, alright, that's it, no more. Now, I'm a grown man and I have kids. I'm going to do anything I can now, anything in my power to do my part."

That feeling of frustrated indifference is one Mahinmi wants to prevent his daughters from ever experiencing in their own lives as African-Americans in the United States.

"Is it normal that I'm numb to this? No, it's not. And I don't want it to be normal for my kids anymore, for it to be just another scene that they have seen before. The fight started a long time ago. As an African, as a Black male from Benin where slavery was at its peak, I've gotta do my part. Even though I started this fight a long time ago, I've gotta do more and I'm going to do more," he said.

"At some point, what are you going to do about it? You get to a point where now I'm 33 years old and I have three girls and I'm looking at myself in the mirror and I'm like, man, if this doesn't start with me, my kids are going to say the same [thing]. Enough is enough."

Mahinmi's thoughts were one of many powerful moments during the 'Race in America' conversation. You can watch the full panel right here:

To watch the full roundtable discussion, featuring Ian Mahinmi, Washington Mystics star Natasha Cloud, and Maryland football head coach Mike Locksley, click here.

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