Joe Barry

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Joe Barry to join Sean McVay's coaching staff with LA Rams

Joe Barry to join Sean McVay's coaching staff with LA Rams

The Redskins dismissed defensive coordinator Joe Barry earlier this month, but it did not take the veteran coach long to find a new job. With former Redskins offensive coordinator Sean McVay now head coach of the Rams, Barry will join the Los Angeles staff as assistant head coach and linebackers coach.

The news, first reported by Peter Schrager of Fox Sports, should not come as a surprise to Redskins fans. Barry was among the most liked coaches on the Redskins' staff and has been a part of successful defenses during his 17-year NFL career. Most notably Barry coached linebackers for the Bucs defenses in the early 2000s, including their 2003 Super Bowl team. 

McVay has moved quickly to fill out parts of his staff, particularly on defense. The 30-year-old head coach hired 69-year-old Wade Phillips to serve as Rams defensive coordinator, a move that limited the 'Skins ability to bring in the former Broncos' defensive architect. 

Adding Barry to Phillips' defensive staff is an interesting twist for the two men, as both interviewed for the vacant Redskins defensive coordinator position in 2015. Barry got that job, and Phillips went to Denver. In the two years since their hiring, Barry's defenses finished near the bottom of the NFL in yards allowed while Phillips won a Super Bowl. Still, despite his success with the Broncos, Phillips was not retained when the team hired new coach Vance Joseph.

It's also hard to get a true evaluation of Barry's term as Redskins defensive coordinator considering how little the franchise invested on defense. Barry was at times cautious in possible personnel changes, but the Redskins spent more than twice as much money on the offensive side of the ball as they did on defense, $76 million to $36 million, respectively. The team's defensive spending ranked 31st out of 32 teams in the league. 

Barry played his college football at the University of Southern California, so the return to L.A. is a homecoming of sorts.

RELATED: 2017 NFL MOCK DRAFT 1.0

Want more Redskins? Check out @JPFinlayCSN for live updates or click here for the #RedskinsTalk Podcast on iTunes, here for Google Play or press play below. Don't forget to subscribe!

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New #RedskinsTalk Podcast: Chris Baker talks Joe Barry dismissal, 'it's a results based business'

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USA Today Sports

New #RedskinsTalk Podcast: Chris Baker talks Joe Barry dismissal, 'it's a results based business'

Chris Baker joined JP Finlay to talk about the Redskins dismissal of Joe Barry, his thoughts on Greg Manusky, and what the hole at defensive coordinator means for his own free agency.

RELATED: 2017 NFL MOCK DRAFT 1.0

Want more Redskins? Check out @JPFinlayCSN for live updates or click here for the #RedskinsTalk Podcast on iTunes, here for Google Play or press play below. Don't forget to subscribe!

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How Su'a Cravens was utilized as a rookie illustrates Joe Barry's faults

How Su'a Cravens was utilized as a rookie illustrates Joe Barry's faults

Su’a Cravens’ first season was filled with indecision about what position he would play, and while there were lots of reasons Joe Barry got fired, the rookie second-round pick's positioning may have played a role.

Late in the year, Cravens announced via Instagram he would play safety in 2017, despite spending nearly all of 2016 at inside linebacker. That decision came against Joe Barry’s will, per a source with knowledge of the situation, after months of resistance to the switch. 

Drafted in the second round, Cravens came to the 'Skins out of a hybrid safety/linebacker role at USC. Mike Mayock of NFL.com gave the following analysis: "Cravens is an outside linebacker-safety hybrid. He's a really good matchup with pass-catching tight ends. They asked him to do a bunch of stuff at USC. This is a really solid second-round pick."

At Barry’s direction, Cravens started the season at inside linebacker and played the position exclusively. 

RELATED: Rex Ryan not likely to be a candidate for Redskins

Some within the organization wanted Cravens to play safety, but Barry insisted the rookie stay at inside linebacker. Eventually, a source explained, the decision to move Cravens to the secondary was made and Barry was forced to adjust. 

Though Cravens never played at safety for Washington, he was included with the secondary position group during practice at the tail end of the season. Should the ‘Skins have reached the playoffs, sources said Cravens would have played through his arm injury at safety.

Barry wasn’t wrong to want Cravens to learn the linebacker position. For a versatile player, he should know the calls and coverages of the defense. At the same time, the Redskins dealt with numerous injuries as well as some poor play at safety, and as the season progressed, multiple voices at Redskins Park wanted the rookie in the secondary.

Regardless, Cravens stayed at inside linebacker. That decision was not what got Barry fired, but it does show a repeated flaw of the former defensive coordinator. 

Early in the season Barry was slow to let Josh Norman travel to cover opposing team’s best receivers. Later in the year, Barry kept Kendall Fuller in the slot a few weeks too long. And for most of the season, Donte Whitner was a liability at safety. Either Cravens or second-year man Deshazor Everrett deserved a shot.

Liked by his players and most who know him, Barry displayed a continued reluctance to make personnel moves, and it might have been part of Jay Gruden's decision to move on. 

RELATED: 2017 NFL MOCK DRAFT 1.0

Want more Redskins? Check out @JPFinlayCSN for live updates or click here for the #RedskinsTalk Podcast on iTunes, here for Google Play or press play below. Don't forget to subscribe!