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Jeff Bostic shares hilarious story of Joe Bugel blaming him for a missed block that wasn't his doing

Jeff Bostic shares hilarious story of Joe Bugel blaming him for a missed block that wasn't his doing

Former Redskins coach Joe Bugel, who died on Sunday at the age of 80, impacted numerous players throughout his time in the NFL. Specifically, from 1981-89 he helped members of  "The Hogs" offensive line in Washington become one of the greatest units ever assembled.

However, for as much as Bugel loved his players and his players loved him back, the two sides were prone to some arguments. Bugel's fiery passion for the game led to some outbursts that no one was immune to. From Joe Gibbs to Russ Grimm, plenty got an earful.

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That includes former Redskins offensive lineman Jeff Bostic, who was alongside Bugel during his nine seasons in Washington. On the latest Redskins Inside Look, Bostic joined former Redskins teammate and legendary running back John Riggins to share one of his most memorable stories of Bugel.

It all started when Mark May, another member of the offensive line, didn't want to hear Bugel yell at him.

“You know the biggest whiner in Redskins history is Mark May. He had missed the block and Buges was on the staff," Bostic said. "Well, May is over there telling him I missed the block."

So, with that information to go off of, Bugel prepared to shame Bostic for the failed play. As Bostic jogged to the sideline following a field goal attempt, he couldn't understand why his name was being called.

“I’m coming off the field and I hear Buges yelling ‘He kicked your a--.’ And I’m like ‘who is he talking to?’" Bostic said. "And then he said it again. I said ‘who are you talking to?' He said, 'I’m talking to you.'”

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That led to Bostic showing his frustrations and sending his helmet hurdling through the air.

“I unbuttoned my helmet and threw it at him from about 15 yards away," Bostic said. "And I just left my helmet and went over and sat on the bench.”

Following the heated back-and-forth, Bugel quickly displayed the other side of his personality -- the one that cared for his players and just wanted to see them succeed. Heading over to Bostic, he wanted him to know there were no hard feelings, it was just the emotion of football getting the best of him.

"He said, ‘Hey horse you know I love you.'”

Because Bostic -- like so many other Redskins -- had a deep love and respect for Bugel, it was easy for him to take the apology and move on. However, he did want his coach to know that all the yelling was actually done for no reason because he was not the one to blame.

"I said 'You got a strange way of showing love. What you’re gonna do is when you watch the film tomorrow you’re gonna owe me an apology,'" Bostic said.

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This story about Joe Bugel and Russ Grimm getting into it on the sidelines is spectacular

This story about Joe Bugel and Russ Grimm getting into it on the sidelines is spectacular

Sometimes in life, your boss or your coach pushes one too many buttons and you simply.can't.take.it.anymore. 

That's a feeling Hall of Famer Russ Grimm once felt during a contest when playing under Joe Bugel. And fortunately, Joe Jacoby saw it all, which allowed him to retell the story on the latest Redskins Talk podcast during an episode devoted to Bugel's life and legacy.

As Jacoby explained, Bugel was fiery. He also used a lot of foul language. Sometimes, when those qualities combined, his offensive linemen would consider going after him.

"You can speak to each one of the guys, there was probably some time in their career they just wanted to take a shot at him," Jacoby said. "That's how he would irritate you so much, because of how he'd coach."

RELATED: WHY JACOBY OWES HIS CAREER TO BUGEL

While things never quite reached that level, Grimm was once on the verge of totally losing it. Allow Jacoby to take it from there.

The closest had to have been Russ, because it was during a game. There was a sack or something, and he is just chewing Russ out on the bench. And Russ is sitting there listening to him, and finally, Russ had enough, got up, cussed him out and shoved his helmet into his stomach and said, 'If you think you can [expletive] do any better, then you get out there.'

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How great is that?

The pair eventually cooled down after that tense exchange, and fortunately/unfortunately, Bugel never took up Grimm on his offer to go try his own hand at blocking.

Now, as funny as that story is, Jacoby believes it also hints at why Bugel's groups were always so successful: It's because he pushed them, kept pushing them and pushed them some more after that.

"I look back on it, and he has so much of an influence on how I run my everyday life as far as the things he taught me and as far as the things he said and did," Jacoby told Redskins Talk. "He was a pleasure to be coached by. He's a friend, a mentor and I loved him dearly."

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Joe Gibbs and Joe Bugel had the same competitive fire despite different personalities

Joe Gibbs and Joe Bugel had the same competitive fire despite different personalities

Following the news of former Redskins offensive line coach Joe Bugel's death at the age of 80 on Sunday, many have shared stories and praise for the man he was on and off the field. Among them was legendary head coach Joe Gibbs, who Bugel worked with from 1981-89 and 2004-07.

“Joe had an incredible passion for the game of football," Gibbs said in a statement. "He came to work every day with such great excitement and his players had tremendous respect for him. The strength of our coaching staff on both sides of the ball was a key reason we had so much success. Bugel was such a big part of that and his impact was felt not only by those Redskins’ teams, but truly across the entire League. I will miss his friendship and I will always cherish our late-night arguments putting together the game plan each week. Pat and I will be praying for his wife Brenda, his girls, and their entire family."

A touching message, there was one portion of Gibbs' statement that deserved a little more explaining: the late-night spouts over the game plan.

On the latest Redskins Talk Podcast, former Washington offensive lineman Joe Jacoby, a founding member of the "Hogs" offensive line that dominated for the Redskins, shared insight into what those arguments consisted of.

“He goes, ‘There’s many nights we’re putting the game plan together that Joe and I,’ him and Buges, would be close to fisticuffs because of their disagreement with the gameplan and stuff," Jacoby said when recalling a story Gibbs told him. “Buges did have that passion about the game. How he thought, seen it, how it should play out and relayed that all to coach Gibbs."

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Those moments didn't just happen behind closed doors late at night, either. According to Jacoby, who says he owes his career to Bugel, it was easy to hear the OL coach voicing his opinions on what was happening on the field every Sunday. It was in those moments where one could see just how differently the two Joe's carried themselves at times.

"Joe [Bugel] was fiery and everything on the sidelines, he’d be yelling at Joe [Gibbs] what to run and stuff like that," Jacoby said. “Them on the sidelines, and Coach Gibbs and how stoic he was and not showing his emotions and stuff. Well, Buges was the total opposite.”

Despite their differences, the heated back-and-forths were not a full display of their relationship. The two coaches were great friends who shared a passion for the game like no one else. Bugel was a coach who would do anything to see his players succeed, and Gibbs was the same way. However, they had different personalities, as Gibbs was quieter while Bugel was always ready to add in his two cents. 

“I think they both had the same passion, just how they displayed it was a lot different," Jacoby said.

RELATED: BUGEL WOULD WORK WITH PLAYERS 'FOREVER'

The tone may have been different, but the passion was always there. That's what made the arguments worth it. Gibbs and Bugel weren't yelling at each other out of spite, but rather as a way to try and get the best out of one another and the team. They have two Super Bowl victories together to show for it.

As for who would have won if those arguments went from "close" to fisticuffs to actual fisticuffs, Jacoby will remain as he did when he was near the arguments during his playing days: impartial.

“I’m going with a draw.”

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