Patrick Corbin

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SEE IT: Nationals players finally receive their World Series rings

SEE IT: Nationals players finally receive their World Series rings

The day came about three months later than we expected, but Nationals players finally received their 2019 World Series Championship rings Thursday.

Patrick Corbin and Adam Eaton were the first to share their new jewelry on Instagram.

"I don't think that's going to fit on my finger!" Eaton said right after he opened the ring box.

Ryan Zimmerman follow with his own video Friday.

The Nationals originally planned to hold a virtual ring ceremony to give fans and players a chance to enjoy such a momentous moment, but they later altered that plan following feedback from the players. Instead, they decided to unveil their championship rings. 

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The 2020 season was delayed before it could begin thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, preventing the Nationals from holding a proper ring ceremony and banner unveiling in front of a sold-out Nats Park.

With two weeks to go before a 60-game regular-season schedule begins, the team has reconnected to get ready for an abbreviated title defense. Under the circumstances, this was the time to do it. 

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Patrick Corbin posts tribute to Tyler Skaggs one year after his death

Patrick Corbin posts tribute to Tyler Skaggs one year after his death

Los Angeles Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs died of an accidental drug overdose on July 1, 2019, putting the baseball in a community in a state of mourning over the sudden loss of the lefty’s life.

Among those affected the most by his death was Nationals starter Patrick Corbin. Skaggs and Corbin were both drafted by the Angels in 2009 before being traded to the Arizona Diamondbacks together a year later. They became close friends while working through minor leagues, each making their MLB debut in 2012. Skaggs was traded back to the Angels in 2013, but the two starters remained friends.

Only one day after Skaggs was found dead in a Texas hotel room, Corbin took the mound for an emotional start against the Miami Marlins. He obtained permission from MLB to wear Skaggs’ No. 45 on the back of his jersey instead of his usual No. 46. Against all odds, the left-hander went seven strong innings allowing just one run on six hits with seven strikeouts.

He marked the one-year anniversary of Skaggs’ death Wednesday by posting a picture of the jersey he wore that day on Instagram with the words “RIP Tyler, we miss you” written across the photo.

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#45 @tylerskaggsfoundation45

A post shared by Patrick Corbin (@patrickcorbin46) on

Ten days after Corbin’s start, the Angels all wore Skaggs jerseys for their first home game following their teammate’s death. Los Angeles went on to throw a no-hitter that afternoon before laying out their jerseys on the mound after the game. Inexplicably, the last no-hitter to be thrown in California before that game was on July 13, 1991—the day Skaggs was born.

Skaggs’ death remains part of an investigation by the Drug Enforcement Administration into how many people within the Angels’ organization knew about the pitcher’s drug use prior to his death.

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Nationals’ Patrick Corbin worried about his family’s safety but eager for MLB to resume play

Nationals’ Patrick Corbin worried about his family’s safety but eager for MLB to resume play

As MLB and its players union discuss terms for what a shortened 2020 season might look like, many players have spoken out about their concerns with playing amid the coronavirus pandemic.

On Monday, Nationals closer Sean Doolittle posted a lengthy Twitter thread laying out the areas he wants league officials to focus on when considering how to protect the health of those involved in putting out games. Tampa Bay Rays starter Blake Snell said on a Twitch stream Wednesday that he won’t play if the union agrees to further pay cuts when they’re the ones putting their health on the line.

In an interview with Cary Chow of NBC4 Washington that aired Thursday evening, Nationals starter Patrick Corbin echoed the thoughts of his teammate Doolittle.

“There’s so many things that need to happen for this to work and obviously the safety—not only for the players, but for the fans, for the players’ families—it’s going to be tough if we’re going to have to play and not be able to see our families for that whole time,” Corbin said. “Obviously, a lot of our parents are older and at that age where this could be a little dangerous, so it’s just tough on everybody.

“I know fans want to get sports on TV and we want to provide that for them, but we got to figure out the right way to do this and I think they’re taking the right steps towards hopefully having a season.”

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There is no set deadline for when MLB and the union must come to an agreement in order to have a season but the league is reportedly targeting June 10 to pick spring training back up before starting the regular season in the first week of July.

Corbin, as restless as anyone to get back out on the field, isn’t sure if three weeks is going to be enough time for players to get back into shape—a sentiment shared by his teammate Adam Eaton.

“We want to play as many games as we can,” Corbin said. “We want to get back out there. Guys were built up through spring training and ready to go. The longer this goes, it’s going to take some more time for us to get back to the playing level that we need to.”

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