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Ted Roof leaves Penn State for Georgia Tech

Ted Roof leaves Penn State for Georgia Tech

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) Well-traveled coaching veteran Ted Roof is on the move again after leaving Penn State following one season as defensive coordinator for the same job at his alma mater, Georgia Tech.

A statement on Georgia Tech's website Wednesday said Roof's hiring could not become official until he completed a background check which would likely occur next week.

``I've known Ted for a long time and I'm excited that he has decided to come back to Georgia Tech,'' Yellow Jackets coach Paul Johnson said.

Roof, a Georgia native, also served as defensive coordinator for the Yellow Jackets under George O'Leary for three seasons starting in 1999. Roof played linebacker at Georgia Tech in the 1980s under Bill Curry.

Penn State coach Bill O'Brien moved immediately to fill the void by promoting secondary coach John Butler to defensive coordinator. Roof's departure comes as somewhat of a surprise after a successful season coordinating O'Brien's defense in the wake of landmark NCAA sanctions on the program for the Jerry Sandusky molestation scandal.

O'Brien and Roof have known each other for a while - O'Brien also coached at Georgia Tech under O'Leary from 1995-2001. O'Leary is now coach at Central Florida.

``I am very appreciative of Ted's contributions to Penn State,'' O'Brien said. ``Ted is a great coach and person. He earned the respect of our players and they enjoyed playing for him. We wish Ted and his family well.''

Under Roof's watch, Penn State was second in the Big Ten in scoring defense (19.1 points), first in sacks (34) and first in red-zone defense. He was also instrumental in opening up recruiting avenues in the South for Penn State, including backup quarterback Steven Bench.

Now, Roof will be asked to stabilize Georgia Tech's defense after Johnson fired defensive coordinator Al Groh at midyear. At the time of Groh's dismissal, Georgia Tech was 89th in points allowed (30.2 points) and 90th in total defense (431 yards per game).

Secondary coach Charles Kelly served as interim coordinator the remainder of the season.

Roof came to Penn State last year after serving as Central Florida's defensive coordinator for less than a month. He landed that job under O'Leary just weeks after leaving Auburn following the 2011 regular season.

Roof directed the Tigers defense for three seasons, including the 2010 national championship season. Johnson called Roof ``one of the most respected football coaches in the nation.''

Roof's resume also includes one season as defensive coordinator at Minnesota (2008) and six seasons at Duke. He became the Blue Devils' head coach in 2003, going 6-45 before departing in 2007; O'Brien was offensive coordinator at Duke from 2005-6.

It was at Minnesota where Roof had Butler as his linebackers coach and special teams coordinator.

In Happy Valley, Butler coached a secondary thin in depth that gradually improved through the season and fixed mistakes that led to early woes on third downs. He's perhaps best known to Penn State fans for his animated sideline demeanor while encouraging or positioning players.

Butler has also coached at South Carolina. This will be his first season as a coordinator, though Penn State also has veteran assistants on that side of the ball: defensive line coach Larry Johnson and linebackers coach Ron Vanderlinden.

``John quickly developed a great relationship with all our players on defense and special teams,'' O'Brien said. ``And his ability to teach and relate to the players on and off the field will greatly assist in making this an easy transition.''

Just two days ago, O'Brien spoke to reporters of the desire to keep his coaching staff intact as much as possible to maintain continuity but also did not want to hold back his assistants from other potential opportunities.

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Follow Genaro Armas athttp://twitter.com/GArmasAP

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AP Sports Writer Paul Newberry in Atlanta contributed to this report.

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There's an impressive list of names reportedly joining Bradley Beal in bid to buy the New York Mets

There's an impressive list of names reportedly joining Bradley Beal in bid to buy the New York Mets

Apparently, the New York Mets are popular.

In a group that looks more like some sort of ESPY's afterparty guest list, Washington Wizards star Bradley Beal is reportedly joined by names such as Super Bowl LIV champ Travis Kelce, NFL Hall of Famer Brian Urlacher, Tennessee Titans running back DeMarco Murray, former Cleveland Browns offensive lineman Joe Thomas, current Denver Nuggets center Mason Plumlee, oh, and some people named Jennifer Lopez and Alex Rodriguez in a bid to buy the Mets. 

That's quite an eclectic group. 

They've already submitted their initial bid of $1.7 billion, according to the New York Post. Hedge fund billionaire Steve Cohen has reportedly made a top bid so far of $2 billion. The report says Mets COO Jeff Wilpon would prefer to sell to the "J-Rod" led group if its offer is close to the best bid at the end of the auction. Both have apparently already put up $300 million of their own money towards the potential purchase.

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According to ESPN, the group is awaiting word from MLB commissioner Rob Manfred on what will happen next. 

Really the more pressing question though has to be how they all came together. Who would've thought Mason Plumlee and J-Lo would go into business together. Or Beal and Kelce. 

Either way, it's a story that continues to gain traction, and clearly has the star power to make for an interesting future for the Mets organization should the deal go through.  

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'I think it's a travesty': Former Washington kicker Mark Moseley upset by name change

'I think it's a travesty': Former Washington kicker Mark Moseley upset by name change

For many who have played for -- or even just followed -- the Washington football team over the years, the name change can be seen as a bittersweet moment. It's viewed by many as a necessary change, but also the end of an era filled with history.

Former Washington kicker Mark Moseley sees nothing "sweet" about the switch in monikers, as his feelings toward the decision are mostly bitter.

In an interview with ABC 7 News' Scott Abraham, Moseley shared how he felt about the name change, expressing great disappointment. To him, the ones most negatively impacted by the decision are the Native Americans.

“Well, I’m disappointed naturally that we’ve given up the fight here," Moseley said. "I’m disappointed here because they are the ones that are losing with this. They respected us, they loved the Redskins. That’s all I got.”

“Now, what do they gain from this? What are the Native Americans going to gain from this? Absolutely nothing. What do they lose? The constant representation of their people," Moseley said.

Moseley explained that throughout his life, and especially during and after his time with Washington, he has made an effort to connect with the Native American community. Through visits, football camps and more, he feels he has a strong understanding of how the name change really impacts the community. 

Based on his past conversations, Moseley believes that the Native American community didn't want the name change. Rather, it was the past moniker that was helping people learn about their history.

“That’s not what they wanted, I can assure you from personal experience of meeting with hundreds and hundreds of them, that’s not what they wanted," Moseley said.

"These radicals once again are going to jump up and down holler and scream that we won, we won," Moseley said. "They haven't won a damn thing. All they have done is hurt the Native Americans. I hope they are happy with themselves."

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As for the conversation on how the name change impacts the history of the franchise, Moseley feels that isn't what the focus should be. To him, it's not the franchise past that will be forgotten

“That’s not the point. That’s where this is all gong wrong. That’s not the point," Moseley said. “The point is that people are taking away liberties every day and this is just another one of them. The name Redskins was not doing anything but helping the Native Americans. It was keeping their name out there, it was making people remember who they are.”

Moseley, who played 13 seasons in Washington, always saw it as an honor to represent that Native Americans with the name and logo. It was a reason he spent so much time with the franchise, stating that it was bigger than the game of football.

“Me as a player, I took great honor and respect to that name," Moseley said. "Every game, every year, year after year after year that I played here I played because that name meant something.”

“I think it’s a travesty that they’re taking that away from the Native Americans here," Moseley said.

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Though Moseley is strongly against the name change, he's accepted that change is sometimes inevitable. He personally believes it was the wrong choice, but is now going to "learn to live with it."

He believes others against the decision will as well. When it comes down to it, the name is only one part of the franchise. For Moseley, as much as he loved what it represented, it's the players past and present that truly make Washington football what it is.

“It’s not really the name so much as it is the players. That’s who the fans, the fans love the players. Those guys that are out there every Sunday, those guys that every day they work their butts off to get bigger, stronger, faster so they can improve and make the team a better team," Moseley said. "That’s what it’s all about, and that’s going to continue."

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