Orioles

Tennis stars Evert, Davenport take swing at acting

Tennis stars Evert, Davenport take swing at acting

LOS ANGELES (AP) Chris Evert and Lindsay Davenport are taking a swing at acting as guest stars on ``CSI.'' Some script revisions were in order, though, when the retired tennis champions shot their scenes.

Evert, Davenport and tennis commentator Justin Gimelstob all play themselves on Wednesday's episode of the CBS series starring Ted Danson and Elisabeth Shue, a friend of Evert's.

According to Evert, the original script called for Davenport to find the body of a female pro player that sets the episode in motion.

Evert recalled thinking: ``Oh my God, Lindsay has a scene where she has to act.''

``She never likes attention,'' Evert said.

Davenport read the script and said, ``I had a panic attack. I was like, `There's no way.'''

By the time Evert arrived at Calabasas Tennis Club for filming, Gimelstob was being fingered as the suspect.

``Most things that come to me that are outside my comfort zone are things that I don't want to do,'' Davenport said. ``You either have that personality or you don't.''

Gimelstob egged both Evert and Davenport on, although Evert didn't need too much persuasion. She hosted ``Saturday Night Live'' in 1989 and played a commentator in the movie ``Wimbledon.''

Shue is a big tennis fan and urged the ``CSI'' writers to pen an episode involving the sport. She's played in Evert's charity event in Florida and the Hall of Famer said the actress' game makes her ``one of the best women celebrities I've ever seen.''

So who flubbed their lines?

``Oh my Lord, that's not a nice question,'' Evert said. ``We came prepared. I don't know if we were any good. Justin probably took it more seriously than we did.''

Evert said acting is relaxed compared to playing pro tennis.

``If you flub up your lines, you can do it five times. In tennis, there's no dress rehearsal. You play your match and that's it,'' the 18-time major champion said.

Shue's character interrogates Evert, and the two trade shots on the court in a scene that took a good part of their 10-hour day to set up and shoot. Cameras filmed each woman's side of the court at least 10 times and then pulled back to film the entire court.

``It was just like commentating. Like we do at Wimbledon, it's hurry up and wait,'' Evert said. ``The first year I did commentating it was like, `Whoa, this is a lot of doing nothing.'''

Davenport felt more comfortable once Gimelstob was taking the heat on camera.

``It was great to be able to play a tennis commentator on a show that I've loved and watched for years,'' she said.

Both Davenport and Evert have three children. Davenport's son and two daughters are 5 and under, while Evert's three sons are 16, 18 and 21.

Evert's sons all played high school tennis, and Davenport's son plays a couple times a week. But don't look for any of them on the pro tours.

``They're all like their father,'' Evert said, referring to ex-husband and former Olympic skier Andy Mill. ``They like the extreme sports.''

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No-hitter hurled in Beltway battle of Nationals-Orioles Double-A affiliates

No-hitter hurled in Beltway battle of Nationals-Orioles Double-A affiliates

In what *has* to be the most important game of the night between the Orioles and Nationals organizations, Bowie Baysox pitcher Michael Baumann threw a no-hitter against the visiting Harrisburg Senators.

The Double-A starting pitcher was absolutely filthy on the mound all night long, dominating the Senators lineup. Baumann needed just 94 pitches to mow down 29 batters, throwing 63 strikes while walking just two batters. He also struck out 10 as he thoroughly shutdown Harrisburg.

Baumann, who is rated the 24th-best prospect in the Orioles farm system according to MLB Pipeline, has had a dynamic start to his Double-A career. The 23-year old has a ridiculous 0.33 ERA through five games (three starts) in Bowie, spanning 27 innings.

This was, of course, his most impressive performance yet.

As for the Baysox offense, every player in the lineup recorded at least one hit. That's irony at its best.

At the time Baumann completed his gem, his organization’s Major League team wasn’t doing so well. The Orioles trailed the Nationals 5-1 in the seventh inning when it was announced on the big screen that Baumann had made history.

During a series in which the Orioles will be hard-pressed to beat their visitors from Washington, it’s nice to have something fun to point to from the minors.

Congratulations to Baumann. If he tosses a few more no-hitters, he’ll certainly find himself rocketing up prospect rankings list in a hurry.

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Managers in Nationals-Orioles series embrace shared history as they face off for the first time

Managers in Nationals-Orioles series embrace shared history as they face off for the first time

Brandon Hyde and Davey Martinez have spent countless days on the same fields, but Tuesday night was the first time they found themselves managing against one another.

Before heading to the nation’s capital to manage the Washington Nationals, Martinez coached under Joe Maddon with the Chicago Cubs from 2015-17. Brandon Hyde was also in Chicago during those years, coaching first base and then succeeding Martinez as Maddon’s bench coach prior to his hire in Baltimore last offseason.

While both figures are competitive enough to not need any added motivation against the opposing team, it’s still a fun moment for the two longtime friends to appreciate.

“Oh, he’s awesome,” Martinez told reporters in the visitor’s dugout before Tuesday’s game when asked about his relationship with Hyde. “I know him and his family very well, almost like family of mine. When we got in town we had dinner together, so it was kind of fun.”

Martinez went on to emphasize he knows Hyde will be playing to win, too.

“Obviously we both know he’s very competitive,” Martinez continued. “He knows that we want to win and he wants to win, so put everything aside. We’re going to compete.”

Despite the difference in records and team expectations in 2019, Hyde was pretty clear about his desire to take down his former colleague.

“Obviously me and Dave are very close friends and I wish him all the success in the world,” Hyde echoed during his own pregame availability. “But obviously I hope we beat them these next couple games.”

Martinez is not the only National to have a relationship with Hyde.

“Davey’s over there, Henry Blanco’s very close friend of mine, Joe Dillon the hitting coach I played with in high school, so I have some close relationships on that staff,” Hyde said.

Martinez knows the Nats can’t let their guard down against weaker opponents, Orioles included. As he put it, the Nationals “gotta come out and play baseball like we always do.”

And yet, even though each manager is putting his best foot forward to try to win the game, same as every other night of the season, it’s hard to ignore the unique relationship between the two.

For most, it’s just another night of baseball. But as Brandon Hyde put it most simply, “this will be a little bit different managing against Davey on the other side.”

Orioles-Nationals has yet to fully develop into a true rivalry, but perhaps a few more games that feel just “a little bit different” will help one blossom going forward.

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