Capitals

Tragic end for former Maryland basketball player

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Tragic end for former Maryland basketball player

By JP Finlay
CSNbaltimore.com

Former Maryland basketball player Earl Badu died from an apparent suicide on Sept. 27, Baltimore County Police officials confirmed on Sept. 28.

Badu apparently jumped from an eastern Baltimore County overpass on I-95 and dropped some 50 feet before landing on I-695, according to reports. Medical personnel transported Badu to Johns Hopkins Bayview, where he was pronounced dead.

A fan favorite during his time in College Park, Badu was a walk-on player for the Maryland team that won the national championship in 2002. Badu, a Baltimore native, found himself in legal and financial trouble in the years preceding his death.

At the time of his death, Badu was heavily indebted to Montgomery County, Md., chiropractor Dr. Alan Cornfield. Montgomery County (Md.) Circuit Court documents revealed Badu's debts to be 300,000. Badu and Cornfield met through Cornfield's connections to the Maryland basketball program, according to his lawyer Lewis Silber.

Apparently Mr. Badu and Dr. Cornfield knew each other for a number of years, Silber said. There was something going on where Badu told Cornfield he could make him a lot of money.

Documents show that Cornfield filed a civil complaint against Badu on Dec. 10, 2010, with a litany of charges: breach of contract, fraud, misrepresentation of facts, unjust enrichment and restitution based upon unjust enrichment.

Silber went on to explain that Badu owed a lot of other people money as well, but the attorney said he was not at liberty to discuss those other people at this time.

Throughout the almost 18-month trial, Badu did not retain a lawyer. Silber added that Badu listed himself as self-employed when asked in court.

Silber last saw Badu on Friday, Sept. 21, in a court room. As part of a payment plan to repay the 300,000, Badu wrote a 20,000 check. That check bounced.

Badu pleaded guilty to writing the bad check, and was sentenced last Friday, according to the Montgomery County Circuit Court Criminal Department. The former Maryland player was due to serve a five-year suspended sentence with three years supervised probation for the bad check charge.

Im not sure where the money went, Silber said. We ended up going to court, and he agreed to pay the money back. In the process of doing so he wrote a check that was not good.

Silber said that Badu asked for more time to make things work.

"It seemed like he was trying to figure things out, Silber said. He seemed that he believed it would be taken care of. As long as we kept pushing it off, another week, another week, it would work out.

Despite Badus requests for more time, Cornfield received no money.

We needed to see something. Nothing was going through, Silber said. Dr. Cornfield wanted his money back and this was the way legally we had to do it.

Calls to Cornfield's office were not immediately returned. What happens with Badus debt remains to be seen, Silber said, but the sadness of the situation did not escape the attorney.

I feel very bad for Mr. Badu, Silber said. I know his family.

Badu was 33 years old at the time of his death.

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Capitals stars react to losing Barry Trotz as head coach

Capitals stars react to losing Barry Trotz as head coach

LAS VEGAS—Alex Ovechkin and Nicklas Backstrom weren’t expecting to lose their head coach less than two weeks after winning the Stanley Cup.

But business is business, Ovi said, and Barry Trotz is handling his by attempting to capitalize on claiming the championship.

“It’s sad,” Ovechkin said on the red carpet at the NHL Awards, where he accepted his seventh Maurice “Rocket” Richard Trophy on Wednesday night. “Obviously, we won together.”

The Caps’ captain also thanked Trotz for directing him—and his teammates—to new heights.  

“First of all, [I want to] thank him for a great job to be our coach, to be our dad, to give us a chance to win,” Ovechkin said. “But then again, it’s a business. You never know what’s going to happen. I’m pretty sure he’s going to be fine and I wish him luck.”

Backstrom, meanwhile, said he was caught off guard by Trotz’s decision to step down over a contract stalemate with the team. Trotz asked for $5 million per for five seasons; the Caps balked over the terms Trotz’s camp sought.   

“I was a little surprised, obviously,” Backstrom said. “I heard the scenario.”

Like Ovechkin, though, Backstrom praised the job Trotz did during his four-year tenure.

“He’s done a great job in Washington,” Backstrom said. “We obviously have him to thank for a lot. He’s done a tremendous job of schooling us and winning a championship. No one is going to take that away from him.”

Trotz’s next move is unclear, but he’s a free agent and currently eligible to negotiate with any team. The Islanders are the only team with an opening for a head coach.

As for Washington, GM Brian MacLellan said that associate coach Todd Reirden will get the first crack at replacing Trotz.

Ovechkin said he thinks Reirden would be a good fit.

“We all respect Todd,” Ovechkin said. “We all like him. Again, it’s not our thing to say who’s going to be head coach, but if it’s going to be Todd, it’s going to be fun.”

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A drawing of the moment Ovi lifted the Stanley Cup makes the moment joyful all over again

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Daniel Duffy on Twitter/@RealArtOfWords

A drawing of the moment Ovi lifted the Stanley Cup makes the moment joyful all over again

How do you make a photo of Alex Ovechkin hoisting the Stanley Cup for the first time even more memorable?

You make it out of all the Capitals' game scores this year, of course.

Capitals fan and artist Daniel Duffy (@RealArtOfWords) posted a phenomenal finished piece commemorating the Cup win on Wednesday, June 20. It's a little meta and astounding to look at, but very fun to try and read. If you want to relive the glory that was the parts of the 2017-18 Capitals season, check out the piece.

The piece, which appears to be done in a traditional medium like pen or marker, holds the team faced, arena played at, and final score of every game. It uses six colors and over sixty lines of text. Ovechkin roars as he holds the Stanley Cup overhead, the white away jersey shaded with bits of grey text. It takes a skilled eye to sort text and colors into shapes and shading, but Daniel did a fantastic job! It's awesome to see a fanbase create different interpretations of iconic moments. We'll surely see more of Ovechkin in this moment.

Just as we thought we were going to get tired of the celebration, fans find new ways to surprise us. Stay creative, Caps fans!

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