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Beagle reveals his 'dream job' with the Capitals

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Beagle reveals his 'dream job' with the Capitals

Jay Beagle is a back-woods, no-frills kind of guy, so it should come as no surprise that the 29-year-old center was in a motor home, vacationing with his family in the Alberta mountains, with no cell service, when his agent, Wade Arnott, tried reaching him to get final approval on a three-year $5.25 million contract with the Capitals.

“I had missed my agent’s calls for almost a day, where he had left me four or five messages leading up to this,” Beagle said Monday on a conference call with reporters. “I also had about five messages on my phone when I got cell reception, so I figured I’d better stop and get this thing done.”

Beagle and his family stopped at a kiosk in the town of Canmore, Alberta, where he printed out an email, signed it, and faxed his acceptance back to Arnott and the Capitals.

Beagle will make $1.45 million next season, along with a $300,000 bonus, and $1.75 million for each of the final two years of the deal, giving him a palatable cap hit of $1.75 million. He said getting the third year of the deal was the most important piece to him.

“One of the things I said to [Arnott] is I’d love to have more years than anything,” Beagle said. “My wife loves it there and I have a kid now. We love it there and I want to stay there as long as I can. I just told him years are important and just left it at that.”

Beagle’s signing leaves the Caps with roughly $18.5 million in cap space. Much of that will go toward contracts for restricted free agents Braden Holtby, Marcus Johansson and Evgeny Kuznetsov, who together figure to eat up in the neighborhood of $12 million.

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What Capitals general manager Brian MacLellan does with the remaining $6.5 million remains to be seen, but it appears none of it will go toward unrestricted free agents Mike Green, Joel Ward and Eric Fehr, who plan on testing the free-agent market at noon on Wednesday.

Beagle, who was also a pending UFA, has spent parts of seven seasons with Green, parts of six seasons with Fehr and the past four seasons with Ward.

“It’s always tough,” Beagle said. “You kind of forget that it is a business until something like this does happen. That’s why I’m very blessed to be back with this organization.

“I obviously want all the guys to come back. I’ve had such great relationships with them and fought alongside them and battled with them. It’s always tough when guys move on and you see them in another jersey. That makes me put in perspective how lucky and how fortunate I am to come back to this organization.”

If the Caps are unable to re-sign Fehr, Beagle could inherit his role as the Caps third-line center. Coming off a career-high 10 goals and 10 assists, Beagle said that’s been his dream job since he first turned pro.

“My goal for next year is to have a bigger role on the team and get better and win the Stanley Cup with this team,” Beagle said.

“I don’t really see myself as a fourth-line guy. As an athlete and as a professional hockey player I want to get better every year and have a bigger role every year. I think that’s what makes a team succeed, when everyone continues to get better and continues to have a bigger role.

“I think this last season I kind of showed I can play in all situations. If they need me on the fourth line, I’m definitely there. But I don’t see myself as a fourth-line guy. I’ve always told people my dream job is that checking-line center position.”

Physically, Beagle said he feels as strong as he ever has in his career and plans on spending this summer working on his puck-handling skills, faceoffs and his explosiveness.

“I want to come back into training camp looking better than I did last year,” he said.

 

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Caps’ dominant power play comes through yet again in win over Rangers

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Caps’ dominant power play comes through yet again in win over Rangers

It seems so simple. The Capitals have one of the best goal-scorers of all-time in Alex Ovechkin and on the power play, he’s almost always in the same spot. He sets up in the “office,” the faceoff circle on the left side of the ice, and waits for one-timers. Everyone knows the Caps are trying to get him the puck, everyone knows the shot is coming.

But nobody can stop it.

“It’s still pretty unique,” Matt Niskanen said after the 4-3 overtime win. “Basic logic tells you it’d be easy to stop, but it’s not.”

Even Ovechkin has no explanation. “It’s all about luck,” he said.

New York Rangers head coach David Quinn had another word for it.

“Sickening.”

Quinn’s Rangers were the latest victims of a power play that has been among the league’s best units for several years. Since 2005, no team in the NHL has a better power play percentage than the Capitals’ 20.8-percent. They once again look lethal this season with the unit currently clicking at an incredible 39.1-percent.

Ovechkin tallied two power play goals Wednesday, both from the office, to help power the Caps to a 4-3 win over New York. Both of Ovechkin’s goals looked pretty similar with John Carlson on the point feeding Ovechkin in the office for the one-timer.

Ovechkin obviously is what powers the team’s power play. With him on the ice, other teams need to account for him at all times.

But the real key to the Caps’ success with the extra man is not Ovechkin, but the other weapons around him.

“In order to completely take [Ovechkin] away other guys are just too open and they’re good enough to score,” Niskanen said. “Are you gonna leave [T.J. Oshie] open in the slot from the hash marks to cover [Ovechkin]? Our power play is set up well with what hands guys are and their skill sets so we have a lot of different options. Guys are good at reading what’s open. It’s pretty lethal.”

“Nobody knows who's going to take a shot when we play like that,” Ovechkin said. “And it's fun to play like that, to be honest with you. When [Nicklas Backstrom] and when [Evgeny Kuznetsov] feeling the puck well, they can find you in the right time and the right place -- same as [Carlson]."

With so many weapons on the power play, teams are forced to choose between playing Ovechkin tight and leaving other players like Kuznetsov and Oshie wide open, or trying to play a traditional penalty kill and risk giving Ovechkin too much room for the one-timer.

The Rangers chose the latter on Wednesday and they suffered the consequences.

“I don't think many teams have played him like they did tonight,” Carlson said. “They gave him a lot more space.”

And Carlson certainly took advantage as well.

Washington’s power play seems to have found a new gear now with the emergence of Carlson. He took his game to a new level last season and he seems to have picked up right where he left off. On Wednesday, as part of a three-point night for him, Carlson provided two brilliant setups for Ovechkin on the power play.

“He dominates the game, I think,” Niskanen said of Carlson. “Moves the puck well, skates well for a big man, can defend. He’s got that offensive feel for the game and offensive touch. Big shot. He’s a good player.”

For many years, it looked like the only thing missing from the Caps’ power play was Mike Green. Carlson has always been good, but no one was able to setup Ovechkin quite as well as Green was in the height of the “young guns” era of the Caps. Now that Carlson seems to be coming into his own as a superstar blueliner who can both score and feed Ovechkin with the best of them, that makes an already dominant Caps’ power play even more lethal.

That was certainly on display Wednesday as the Caps fired eight shots on goal with the extra man. Ovechkin’s two goals tie him for ninth on the NHL’s all-time power play goals list with Dino Ciccarelli at 232.

Even with Ovechkin now 33 years old and after several years of dominance with the extra man, the Caps’ power play may be better than ever.

“They don’t get rattled,” Quinn said. “There’s a confidence to them and a swagger to them, which they should have.  They’ve been playing together a long time and they’re the defending Stanley Cup champions, so they should play with a swagger.”

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5 reasons the Capitals beat the Rangers in overtime

5 reasons the Capitals beat the Rangers in overtime

The Caps gave up a 2-1 and 3-2 lead, but ultimately came away victorious on Wednesday in a 4-3 win over the New York Rangers thanks to an overtime goal from Matt Niskanen.

Here are five reasons why the Caps won.

1. Djoos saves a goal

With the Caps already trailing 1-0 in the first period, they were about an inch away from going down by two. Luckily, Christian Djoos was there to make the save.

Yes, Djoos, not Braden Holtby.

A diving Jesper Fast got to a loose puck before any of the Caps defenders and beat Holtby with the shot. Djoos, however, was there to sweep the puck off the goal line and out, saving a goal.

That play turned out to be a two-goal swing as less than two minutes later, the Caps scored to tie the game at 1.

2. Carlson off the faceoff

The Caps emphasized the importance of the faceoff this week and worked on it specifically in practice on Tuesday. That practice turned out to be very prescient as Washington’s first goal of the night came right off the faceoff.

Nicklas Backstrom beat Ryan Spooner on the draw cleanly in the offensive zone, feeding the puck back to John Carlson. With the players all bunched up off the draw, Carlson benefitted from Brady Skjei standing right in front of Henrik Lundqvist. Carlson teed up the slap shot and beat Lundqvist who never saw the puck.

Of the five combined goals scored in the game, three were directly set up off a faceoff.

3. Hand-eye coordination

With the Caps on the power play, Fast tipped a pass meant for Carlson that looked like it was headed out of the offensive zone. Carlson reacted to the puck then stretched the stick and somehow managed to control the bouncing puck and keep it in the zone.

Fast charged Carlson at the blue line so he chipped the puck to Ovechkin in the office. Ovechkin managed to hit the puck just as it hit the ice and somehow beat Lundqvist with the shot.

Ovechkin was by the boards at the very edge of the circle. It was an amazing shot and it was set up by the great hustle play from Carlson. Both showed tremendous hand-eye coordination to control that puck.

4. Braden Holtby

Lundqvist entered this game with a 1.99 GAA and .939 save percentage, but he was outplayed by his counterpart from Washington.

Holtby had himself a night. He was particularly strong down low with the pads as he made a number of key pad saves throughout the game, particularly in the second period when he recorded 17 saves including a shorthanded breakaway save on Kevin Hayes as time expired.

Of the three goals Holtby allowed, the first he made a great save on Chris Kreider who looked like he had an empty net to shoot at. Mike Zibanejad would score on the rebound. The second goal came as a shot deflected off Devante Smith-Pelly and went right to Jimmy Vesey for an easy tap-in. The third was a deflection goal from Kreider to redirect a shot that was going wide.

Can’t blame Holtby for those.

5. Working from the office

The Caps had three power play opportunities on the night. They scored on two of them and those two goals looked pretty darn similar.

There was the one described above in which a hustle play by Carlson at the point kept the puck alive and he fed to Ovechkin in the office. The second goal came with Carlson on the point feeding Ovechkin in the office.

Those two goals give Ovechkin 232 power play goals for his career, tying him with Dino Ciccarelli for ninth on the NHL’s all-time list.

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