Capitals

Quick Links

COUNTDOWN TO SHUTDOWN: 31 DAYS

845429.png

COUNTDOWN TO SHUTDOWN: 31 DAYS

By Ben Raby
CSNwashington.com

One day after the NHL Players Association shared its proposal for a new collective bargaining agreement, Commissioner Gary Bettman said Wednesday that a wide gap remains between the NHL and the PA.

Bettman said last week that if a new CBA is not in place by Sept.15, the players will be locked out for the second time in eight years. That gives the two sides, who met for just over an hour Wednesday, exactly one month to work on a new deal.

"This is a process that we're going to continue to work hard on, Bettman told reporters in Toronto after Wednesdays negotiating session. I think there are still a number of issues where we're looking at the world differently."

In their offer yesterday, the players said that they are willing to sacrifice salary in an effort to support some of the Leagues financially weaker clubs.

Rather than have the NHLs annual salary cap be tied directly to the NHLs hockey related revenues (HRR), the players proposed that the salary cap increase by fixed rates in each of the first three years of the new CBA.

Based on the Leagues yearly growth of HRR (an average of seven percent annually), the players argue that the fixed rates theyre proposing for salary cap growth (two percent in year one, four percent in year two and six percent in year three) would provide the owners with greater profits.

The union went as far as suggesting that they would be sacrificing 465 million in salaries over the next three years if the Leagues annual HRR continues to grow at the same rate it has under the existing CBA. The players would like these funds to go towards additional revenue sharing among the 30 NHL clubs.

What the players did is indicate to the owners that if there are issues remaining, they are club specific issues, NHLPA executive director Donald Fehr said Wednesday.

If the clubs that dont need financial assistance are willing to partner with the players to help get at the issues of the clubs that may need it, were prepared to do that.

TSN hockey analyst Aaron Ward said Wednesday that the PAs proposal also included limits on non-player spending such as costs for a clubs coaching staff and management team.

The PA is also pitching the possibility of giving teams in financial trouble extra draft picks, and the option of trading or selling up to 4 million in salary cap space to another team.

Bettman said Wednesday that he was disappointed in the PAs proposal, which he described as incomplete and lacking responses to the owners original proposal they put forth in July.

Fehr is scheduled to meet with players over the next few days before meeting with Bettman again next Wednesday- at which point the two sides will have just over three weeks to sign a new CBA and avoid another lockout.

Quick Links

Who will the Caps' backup goalie be next season?

backup_goalie.jpg
USA TODAY Sports

Who will the Caps' backup goalie be next season?

Very few teams have the luxury of having a backup goalie they can rely on for an extended period of time while the starter goes through a massive slump. The Capitals had that luxury in 2017-2018 thanks to Philipp Grubauer.

Not every team in the NHL has a dependable starter, let alone backup, so when a backup goalie goes 15-10-3 in a season with a 2.35 GAA and .923 save percentage, that is likely to catch the attention of general managers around the league.

The 2018-19 season will likely be a season of transition for the Capitals behind Braden Holtby. General manager Brian MacLellan expressed his willingness Wednesday to possibly trade backup goalie Philipp Grubauer this offseason. With the season he just had, he could potentially yield the Caps a solid return.

But, if Grubauer is indeed moved, that leaves the question of who will play backup for the Capitals this season?

The initial plan appears to be to promote Pheonix Copley from the AHL.

“Yeah, I think he's capable of it,” MacLellan said when asked if he saw Copley as an NHL backup. “Obviously, he's unproven. I think he's done what he could do at the American League level. Got through probably a little bit of a tough patch this year recovering from an injury, but I think he has potential to be that guy, yes.”

Copley, 26, played last season with the Caps’ AHL affiliate Hershey Bears. He had a tough season with a 2.91 GAA and .896 save percentage in 41 games.

As MacLellan alluded, Copley suffered a serious injury at the end of the previous season and it clearly affected his season. The year prior, Copley managed a 2.15 GAA and .931 with Hershey in 16 games. He was considered Washington’s No. 3 goalie this season and was recalled for the playoffs as an emergency backup behind Grubauer.

Copley’s career includes only two NHL games.

There is another internal candidate who some fans may be hoping to see next season. That of course, is 2015 first-round draft pick Ilya Samsonov.

Samsonov, 21, signed an entry-level contract with Washington in May and will make the jump from the KHL to North America next season.

But don’t expect to see Samsonov backing up Holtby to start the NHL season.

Samsonov will be adjusting to the North American game and the smaller North American rink. Because of that, MacLellan believes he will benefit from time in the AHL before making the jump to the NHL.

"I think he needs time in Hershey,” MacLellan said. “We'll start him in Hershey I would anticipate and see how he grows, see how he gets accustomed to the small rink and hopefully get some good coaching, get our guys in that work with him. It'll be up to him. I think he'll adapt fairly quickly given his skill set.”

MORE CAPITALS COVERAGE:

Quick Links

Devante Smith-Pelly is hopeful he has found a home with the Capitals

Devante Smith-Pelly is hopeful he has found a home with the Capitals

“I didn't think I'd be here a year ago,” Devante Smith-Pelly told the media Wednesday. “That's for sure.”

In 2017, Devante Smith-Pelly was a member of the New Jersey Devils and thought that’s where he would play the 2017-18 season. Instead, Smith-Pelly was bought out of the final year of his contract, something that he was not prepared for as he only received word of the team’s decision on the same day they made the move.

New Jersey’s loss turned out to be Washington’s gain as the Caps signed Smith-Pelly for one year and he proceeded to score seven goals during the Capitals’ postseason run to the Stanley Cup.

“Obviously, at the start of the year, not knowing exactly where I would be to at the parade on Constitution, it's crazy," Smith-Pelly said. "I haven't really sat down and taken it all in, but I wouldn't trade it for the world. I had an amazing time this year. Obviously, it's the best year of my life.”

Now as a restricted free agent, Smith-Pelly is hoping he has found a home in Washington.

Despite being only 26-years-old, Smith-Pelly has already had somewhat of a journeyman’s career. The Caps are the fifth team in which he has played for.

The issue for much of Smith-Pelly's career has been consistency.

The 2018 playoffs was not his first breakout performance. He scored five goals in just 12 playoff games for the Anaheim Ducks in 2014, but he failed to live up to that level of production again until this year’s postseason with Washington.

“I don't think I needed to prove anything,” Smith-Pelly said. “I knew what I could do, it's just me getting a chance to do it and that's it. I got a chance here and I guess it worked out.”

Expecting him to score seven goals every 24 games in the regular season is likely unrealistic, but the Caps don’t need him to do that. Smith-Pelly developed a role with the Caps being a bottom-six player, a role that he thrived in throughout the season.

“He's become a big part of the team,” general manager Brian MacLellan said. “He brings good energy, he's a good teammate, he's well-liked. You could tell the teammates really migrate towards him, they like him and then the crowd also likes him. They're chanting 'DSP' all the time so it's been fun to watch how he's got everybody to embrace him and his personality.”

Given when Smith-Pelly was able to do in the postseason, it is no surprise that the Caps would be interested in keeping him around. But at what cost?

Smith-Pelly was a bargain for Washington last season with a cap hit of only $650,000. He will be due a raise, but with John Carlson expected to get a monster contract, how much will general manager Brian MacLellan be willing to spend on a bottom-six winger like Smith-Pelly?

Despite the phenomenal postseason, Smith-Pelly had only seven goals and 16 points in the entire regular season. When it comes to a new contract, MacLellan will likely want to pay for that player while Smith-Pelly will no doubt look to be paid like the player who scored seven times in 24 playoff games.

As of Wednesday when he spoke with reporters, Smith-Pelly said he had not yet had any talks with the team about a new contract, but also noted that, as a restricted free agent, “there’s no real rush.”

The Caps own Smith-Pelly’s rights which helps their bargaining position. Smith-Pelly, however, is arbitration eligible and his postseason stats will undoubtedly bump his value when viewed by a neutral arbitrator.

But there's a good chance it may not get anywhere close to that point.

“On the ice and off the ice I feel like this is the best situation I've been in,” Smith-Pelly said. “Obviously, never know what's going to happen but I found a place and I want to be back.”

MORE CAPITALS COVERAGE: