Capitals

Quick Links

Fehr: Players would lose $1.6 billion

don_fehr.png

Fehr: Players would lose $1.6 billion

That thud you just heard was the collective hearts of hockey fans hitting the floor.

In a letter sent to the NHL’s 700-plus membership and player agents on Tuesday night, Don Fehr wonders whether the NHL’s 50-50 proposal is a “serious attempt” to save the season or simply a vehicle toward more salary reductions.

The letter, obtained by TSN reporter Bob McKenzie, is summarized with the following sobering excerpts:
 
+ “Simply put, the owners’ new proposal, while not quite as Draconian as their previous proposals, still represents enormous reductions in player salaries and individual contracting rights. As you will see, at the 5 per cent industry growth rate the owners predict, the salary reduction over six years exceeds $1.6 billion. What do the owners offer in return?"
 
+ "The proposal does represent movement from their last negotiating position, but still represents very large, immediate and continuing concessions by players to owners, in salary and benefits (the Players' Share) and in individual player contracting rules."
 
+ "They want to "clarify" HRR definition and rules. It is not immediately clear what this means, but so far all of their ideas in this regard have had the effect of reducing HRR, and thereby lowering salaries."
 
+ "The Players' Share is reduced to 50 per cent from 57 per cent immediately -- this season. This is a reduction in the share of 12.3 per cent. On last year's revenue numbers, this would mean that players' salaries would be cut by about $231 million."
 
+ "The proposal includes a "Make Whole" provision, to compensate players for the anticipated reduction in absolute dollars from last year (2011-12), to this year and next year. However, it would work like this. The Players Share in subsequent years would be reduced so that this "Make Whole" payment would be made. It is players paying players, not owners paying players. That is, players are "made whole" for reduced salaries in one year by reducing their salaries in later years."
 
+ "Finally, they also proposed that the players could appeal supplemental or commissioner discipline to a neutral arbitration, on a "clearly erroneous" standard, which, as a practical manner, makes it very unlikely that any decision would be overturned."
 
+ "We do not yet know whether this proposal is a serious attempt to negotiate an agreement, or just another step down the road. The next several days will be, in large part, an effort to discover the answer to that question."
 
+ "Bear in mind the approach that the Players have taken to these negotiations. It is:
 
Given the enormous concessions players made in the last round, plus 7 years of record revenue reaching $3.3 billion last season, there is no reason for a reduction in the amount the players receive.
 
Players are willing to take reduced share going forward so that the NHL can grow out of whatever problems some franchises face.
 
The player contracting rights secured in the last negotiations should be, at minimum, maintained.
 
Revenue sharing needs to be enhanced and structured so as to encourage revenue growth by the receiving teams.
 
The overall agreement has to be fair and equitable for both parties. Bargaining is both give and take."

Quick Links

Regardless of what happens in Game 7, these are not the 'same old Caps'

Regardless of what happens in Game 7, these are not the 'same old Caps'

These are not the same old Caps.

Heading into Game 6 of the Eastern Conference Final on Monday, there was a lot of handwringing around Washington and with good reason. The Capitals were facing elimination for the first time this postseason. Of course the fans were on edge; no one wanted this run to end.

But even though the Caps are competing for the conference crown and have gotten past their archrivals to get here, the refrains leading into Game 6 were the same ones we’ve heard from past years.

 “They don’t want it enough.”

“There’s no heart.”

“Totally outcoached.”

“Chokers.”

And perhaps most damning, “Same old Caps.”

Stop it already.

Seriously, how can anyone have watched this postseason and walked away thinking this is the same Caps team?

Does no one remember the start of the season? Some people didn’t even think they would make the playoffs. Others were advocating the team trade Alex Ovechkin and start over. Yet here they are.

Finally, finally they got past the second round hump. They beat the Pittsburgh Penguins—ending their two-year reign as Stanley Cup Champions—and handed Mike Sullivan his first ever series loss as the Penguins head coach.

And no, Mike Wilbon, just because they made it past the second round doesn’t mean it’s OK to lose in the Conference Finals. But considering how they got there, they showed they have at the very least changed the narrative surrounding the Capitals.

Washington lost the first two games of its series against the Columbus Blue Jackets in the first round and went on to win four straight to advance. In the second round, they faced the two-time defending champions, a team they had beaten only once in the playoffs in franchise history and a team that had not lost a playoff series since 2015.

And they won.

And yet, people are acting like nothing changed with the Caps. Why? Because they lost three in a row to Tampa Bay?

OK, you've got a point. What kind of a team loses three straight in the playoffs? Hard-nosed teams with tough coaches that play the right way like Columbus or Anaheim wouldn’t let that happen to them. Oh, actually Columbus lost four in a row to the Caps and the Ducks got swept in the first round. Never mind.

Well, certainly not a team with a championship history like the Los Angeles Kings. Oh wait, never mind, the got swept by Vegas. Bad example.

Well, surely an original six team with a championship pedigree like the Boston Bruins would never let that happen. Oh yeah, they lost four straight to the same Tampa Bay team.

OK, OK, but were any of those teams really contenders this year? I mean, none of those teams were as good as Winnipeg and they won’t let themselves lose three in a row in the playoffs.

That’s because they lost four straight to Vegas in the conference final.

You see where this is going, right?

It just boggles the mind that anyone could see the game plan Barry Trotz put together in Game 6 in Pittsburgh, without three top-six forwards including Nicklas Backstrom, and win in overtime and still complain that he is always outcoached in the playoffs. He certainly wasn’t outcoached in that game or that series.

It’s baffling that anyone can see how Washington rallied past Columbus after losing Game 1 and Game 2, recovered from a disastrous Game 1 to Pittsburgh and won the first two games in Tampa Bay against a favored Lightning team and complain that this team “doesn’t want it enough.”

Chokers don’t advance to the third round. Chokers don’t beat the two-time defending champions when no one else could. Chokers don’t force seven games against a Tampa Bay team that finished off both of their prior series in just five games.

Just stop. Find a new storyline to push because this one is lazy and played out. It’s been done.

Don’t get me wrong, losing four in a row after winning Game 1 and Game 2 on the road would have really stung. With the history this team has, the fact that they finally got past Pittsburgh gave this team a feel of destiny. If they go on to lose Game 7 and end their run without a Stanley Cup or even a conference crown to show for it, that would be disappointing. No question about it.

But to say these are the “same old Caps” if they lose to Tampa Bay? That’s ridiculous. They have already put those demons to rest. Three straight losses to the Lightning don’t change that and neither will whatever happens in Game 7.

Regardless of what happens on Wednesday, whether the Caps win or lose, no one should come out and say these are the same old Caps. They have already proven that’s not the case.

Those Caps are gone. Now let’s see how far these Caps can go.

MORE CAPITALS STORIES

Quick Links

The Lighting are doubling down on stupid protocol to keep Capitals fans out of Amalie Arena for Game 7

The Lighting are doubling down on stupid protocol to keep Capitals fans out of Amalie Arena for Game 7

Remember when the folks at Amalie Arena went to great lengths to try and "block the red" during the Eastern Conference Final against the Capitals?

Well, the Lightning are doing that again for Game 7. Not that anything else would've been expected though.

Before the series, the Lightning used this tactic to try and keep as many Capitals fans out as possible, and they also enforced a dress code.

Not only could you not buy tickets through the team or its official partner, Ticketmaster, without a Florida Zip code, but the Lightning also added a clause to their ticket policy that wouldn't allow Capitals fans who were able to get tickets to wear red or anything with the team's logo if their seats are in the Lightning's Lexus Lounge.

This includes seats against the glass, or in the Chase Club luxury suites.

Neutral colors were the only thing allowed.

There are certainly ways around the ticket policy part. Whether you go through a different website for tickets like Stubhub, or as many have been suggesting on Twitter, using a prepaid gift card.

At this point though, with Game 7 closing in, you hopefully have a plan in place already if you're going to the game in Tampa.

This also isn't uncommon for teams to do anyway, with the Capitals having a similar policy.

Of course, we totally support the Caps doing this. When it's another team doing it to Caps fans though, that's a different story. 

The Capitals won the first two games of the series in Tampa, now it just takes one more win to get them to the Stanley Cup Final, where the expansion Vegas Golden Nights await

MORE CAPITALS PLAYOFF NEWS: