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Glencross may be seeking work in Colorado

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Glencross may be seeking work in Colorado

After experiencing the raw emotions of going from playoff hero to playoff goat in the same game, former Capitals forward Curtis Glencross is now looking for employment and could be headed to Denver for a tryout.

According to the Denver Post, the Avalanche is declining comment on rumors that the club is preparing to sign Glencross to a professional tryout contract.

Glencross, 32, had an unfortunate end to his brief stay in Washington. Acquired from the Calgary Flames at the NHL trade deadline in exchange for a second- and third-round draft pick in the 2015 NHL draft, Glencross scored the go-ahead goal for the Capitals in Game 5 against the Rangers in the second round of the playoffs.

It was his only playoff goal for the Caps. But with 1:41 separating the Caps from a series-clinching victory, Chris Kreider scored for Rangers to send the game into overtime, where Glencross’ neutral zone giveaway resulted in Ryan McDonagh’s game-winning goal. The Rangers also won Games 6 and 7 to advance, with Glencross a healthy scratch in favor of Eric Fehr in Game 7.    

“Glencross, it looked like it was going to work early,” Caps general manager Brian MacLellan said in his post-season news conference with reporters.

“I’ve been watching Glencross since he broke into the (pros) in Cincinnati. He came in, he scored some goals for us early, and then some things went on that he kind of lost his game a little bit and I don’t think we had time to wait around for him to find it again.

“There is a good player in there; we saw a little bit of it. I made the point to the coaches, if we win (Game 5) when he scored that goal, it’s a great trade. That’s the fine line. (The Rangers) came back and unfortunately, they scored.”

Glencross made $2.5 million in the final year of his contract and the Capitals did not show interest in signing him in the offseason. Neither, it appears, has any other NHL teams.

Glencross told the Calgary Sun last month that he learned “you’re just a number” when it comes to the business side of hockey.

“If I could do it again … as much as I love (Calgary) and call it home and met great people, at the same time, when it’s time for you to cash in, you have to take advantage and cash in,” he said. “You can’t take a pay-cut or hometown discount because things change.”

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Key Caps questions: Who will play center on the fourth line?

Key Caps questions: Who will play center on the fourth line?

The dog days of summer are officially here, but it's never too hot to talk some hockey.

Capitals correspondent JJ Regan is here to help you through the offseason doldrums as he discusses key questions facing the Caps for the upcoming season as Washington prepares to defend its title for the first time in franchise history.

Today's question: Who will be the team's primary fourth line center?

With the departure of Jay Beagle, there is a spot open at center on the fourth line. There appears on the roster to be three clear candidates to fill that position: Chandler Stephenson, Travis Boyd and Nic Dowd.

To find out why you should cross Stephenson’s name off the list, you should read yesterday's Key Caps Question about whether or not Stephenson is a wing or a center. To summarize, Washington sees Stephenson as more of a wing which explains why they both re-signed Boyd and brought in Dowd.

So who will it be between those two?

Both players seem to fit the mold as effective centers in the AHL where they were both productive. Dowd has an edge in NHL experience with 131 NHL games as compared to Boyd’s eight.

But Barry Trotz clearly had faith in Boyd at center which is why we saw him fill in on the top line on March 18 in Philadelphia. Boyd rewarded that faith with a spin pass to Alex Ovechkin for an assist, his first career point.

Trotz is now gone and Todd Reirden is in charge, but there is at least a level of familiarity there with the coaching staff and Boyd, more so than with Dowd who is new to the organization.

Second, the Caps may have tipped their hand a bit when you compare the two contracts. Center is an important position and Brian MacLellan has frequently referenced the team’s strength in center depth as a major reason for their Cup run.

Both Boyd and Dowd were signed over the offseason. Both contracts are one-way, suggesting both will be in the NHL, but Boyd’s cap hit is $800,000 while Dowd’s is $650,000. Of course, that will not matter when the players get on the ice. If Dowd outplays Boyd, he will start over him. Plus, the market ultimately dictates price. Even if the Caps wanted Dowd for their top line, if you can get him for $650k, you sign him for $650k.

Considering how important a position center is, however, even on the fourth line, it seems telling that the team was willing to give Boyd, a player with eight games of experience to his name, $800k while Dowd was signed for the minimum. That seems to suggest the Caps at least foresee Boyd having a bigger role which, for two players penciled in for the fourth line, would mean playing him at center.

Other key Caps questions:

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Key Caps questions: Is Chandler Stephenson an NHL wing or center?

Key Caps questions: Is Chandler Stephenson an NHL wing or center?

The dog days of summer are officially here, but it's never too hot to talk some hockey.

Capitals correspondent JJ Regan is here to help you through the offseason doldrums as he discusses key questions facing the Caps for the upcoming season as Washington prepares to defend its title for the first time in franchise history.

Today's question: Is Chandler Stephenson an NHL wing or center?

To answer this we first have to know what a center is. A center’s main focus in the middle of the ice. He is expected to cover that area at both ends and be almost a third defenseman when the puck moves into the defensive zone. Because they are expected to cover more of the ice, they need to be strong skaters. They also typically are the best setup player on a line as they set up the wingers. Obviously there are exceptions where centers can be strong goal scorers and wingers can be good setup players, but this is typically their function.

So a defensively responsible forward who is a strong skater? Stephenson certainly has that skillset.

But there is a difference between a good skater and a fast skater. Jakub Vrana, for example, is one of the fastest skaters on the team, but there's no denying he is a winger. Stephenson always seems to be better offensively when he’s ahead of the play rather than trailing it. His speed is most effective on the counter.

If you want to know what the Caps are thinking, consider this. There is a spot open at fourth line center and the team signed Travis Boyd, a center, to a one-way contract and signed winger/center Nic Dowd as a free agent. It certainly seems as if the team is looking at options other than Stephenson to fill that spot.

General manager Brian MacLellan essentially confirmed this when he spoke with reporters in July.

“I prefer Chandler on the wing,” he said. “He seems to be more effective there, but I’m not opposed to him playing center, too.”

Stephenson is an option at center if the Caps need it, but it’s clear the team sees him more as a wing.

Other key Caps questions: