Capitals

Capitals

Sidney Crosby has been diagnosed with a concussion, the Penguins announced Monday afternoon.

Crosby sat out Saturday's preseason finale against the Blue Jackets because he was not feeling well.

He then missed practice Monday morning to undergo concussion testing, the team said in a statement.

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The injury occurred in practice on Friday, Coach Mike Sullivan told reporters in Pittsburgh.

On Thursday, the Penguins are set to raise their Stanley Cup banner at PPG Paints Arena prior to hosting Alex Ovechkin and the Capitals in the regular season opener.

Crosby’s latest concussion comes during one of the more dominant stretches of the 29-year-old’s illustrious career. He captured the Conn Smythe Trophy as the NHL’s playoff MVP last June after guiding the Penguins to the franchise’s fourth Stanley Cup—and his second. In late September, Crosby was named MVP of the World Cup after leading Team Canada to the championship.

And now this.

Concussions are always scary for athletes in contact sports. They're even more troubling for athlete who have long histories with them, as Crosby does.  

After suffering a concussion during a blindside collision with former Capitals center David Steckel in the 2011 Winter Classic, the two-time league MVP saw a pair of seasons cut short due to concussion-related ailments. He played in only 41 games in 2010-11 and just 22 contests the following seasons.

 

Crosby has not suited up for a game since Team Canada captured the World Cup title on Sept. 29 in Toronto.

His status will be updated when more information is known, the Penguins’ statement said.

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