Sidney Crosby suffered a concussion in Game 3 that forced him to miss the next game, but he shocked the hockey world when he was a full participant in practice just four days later and playing in Game 5.

In the first period of Game 6, though, Crosby took another scary looking fall, this one head-first into the boards, and was slow to get up and get off the ice.

You can see the play in the video above.

What happened after that? Nothing. Crosby was not pulled off the bench and played out the period.

But shouldn’t one of the NHL’s independent concussion spotters have pulled Crosby out?

Crosby went violently headfirst into the boards and was sluggish getting back to his feet. The NHL’s concussion spotters are tasked with monitoring play for players who are showing signs of a concussion. How does this not qualify?

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Let’s be clear, I am not a doctor. But what is the point of having concussion spotters if hits like that do not even register on their radar?

Before you say, “Why don’t they just look at him during the intermission” that’s not the point of the independent spotters. Their job is to pull players regardless of whether it is inconvenient, regardless of who they are, regardless of the situation and say that player needs to be checked.

 

Maybe Crosby is fine. He certainly looked fine following the hit, but the point of the spotters is to make sure he is fine before he goes back onto the ice.

It’s very easy for people on the outside looking in to question why Crosby was allowed to play in Game 5 given his concussion history, but you have to assume the team doctors know what they are doing and would not risk Crosby’s health. In this case, however, you cannot help but question what the league’s spotters were looking at.

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