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Will the Shattenkirk trade force the Caps into another deadline deal?

Will the Shattenkirk trade force the Caps into another deadline deal?

With the NHL trade deadline on Wednesday, the question surrounding the Capitals was whether the team would make a move or stand pat. On Monday we got our answer as the team acquired defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk and prospect goalie Pheonix Copley from the St. Louis Blues in exchange for forwards Zach Sanford, Brad Malone and a first and a conditional draft pick(s).

But by addressing the only real weaknesses on the roster, the Caps may have exposed another flaw they could potentially try to address before Wednesday's trade deadline.

With only two right-shooting defensemen in Matt Niskanen and John Carlson, this was a clear area of need for the team. Because of the struggles of the team's two netminders in the AHL, Washington was also in need of a third goalie in case of an injury to Braden Holtby and Philipp Grubauer. You can read more on the team's needs heading into the trade deadline here.

RELATED: Capitals land defenseman Kevn Shattenkirk

The team addressed both of those needs Monday with Shattenkirk and Copley, but it came at a price. Losing draft picks will have future implications, but the loss of Sanford weakens the team in the present.

Heading into the postseason, if healthy, it's not hard to guess what the Caps' forward lines would be:

Alex Ovechkin - Nicklas Backstrom - T.J. Oshie
Marcus Johansson - Evgeny Kuznetsov - Justin Williams
Brett Connolly - Lars Eller - Andre Burakovsky
Daniel Winnik - Jay Beagle - Tom Wilson

But what if there was an injury? Prior to the hand injury suffered by Andre Burakovsky, the Caps were using the minimum number of forwards and cycling through players from Hershey for road games. That's not an ideal setup for the playoffs.

The plan was thought to be for the team to carry Sanford and Jakub Vrana as the two depth forwards for the postseason. Pinning your hopes on two rookies to step into a playoff situation when called upon is not without risk. Now, however, the Caps don't even have that.

There's a difference between plugging a player in the lineup in the regular season and in the playoffs. The regular season offers an opportunity to give players like Riley Barber and Chandler Stephenson valuable experience. The team can feel comfortable plugging in Zach Sill or Liam O'Brien for a few games. But when it comes to the playoffs in which every game counts, every win brings you one step closer to the Stanley Cup and every loss brings the season closer to an end, the team needs more options than a handful of green prospects and veteran AHLers.

Vrana is projected to be a top-six talent and is starting to hit his NHL potential. He also, however, is prone to turnovers and needs to work on how he plays without the puck. He is a good option for Washington in the playoffs, but for him to be the only option is an enormous risk.

The Shattenkirk deal shows the Caps are all-in this year, but there's one more move they may need to make. With Sanford now gone, the Caps will need to act fast to bring in more forward depth because, besides Vrana, there's not a whole lot of options within the organization.

MORE CAPITALS: Trotz admits Ovechkin was "off" during Saturday's game

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Capitals Mailbag Part 2: Why are abusive coaching tactics tolerated?

Capitals Mailbag Part 2: Why are abusive coaching tactics tolerated?

It’s time for a new Capitals Mailbag! You can read Wednesday’s Part 1 here.

Check out Part 2 below.

Have a Caps question you want answered in the next mailbag? You can submit your questions here at the Capitals Mailbag submissions page on NBCSportsWashington.com.

Please note, some questions have been edited for clarity.

Nathan S. writes: Why have abusive coaches such as Bill Peters, Marc Crawford, and to some extent Mike Babcock been tolerated as it's clear that front office people and players knew about this type of abuse for years?

Because I do not believe players have felt empowered enough to speak out. While some people knew somewhat what these coaches were doing, I do not believe they knew to what extent. Who in their right mind would have hired Peters if they had known he had shouted the N-word in a locker room? They wouldn't have. Even if Calgary Flames general manager Brad Treliving had known Peters could get after his players, had he known to what extent he never would have done it.

To me, it's a culture thing. I am not saying the culture of hockey is rotten, far from it. What I am saying is hockey players have a mentality of not wanting to speak out about...well, anything. That has to change.

The position of authority these coaches hold over players is a factor as well. A coach does not just get to the NHL and decides he wants to be a hard-ass. He has been doing it at every step of his career meaning in the junior leagues, in college, in the minors. If you're a player in one of those leagues and hope to make it to the NHL someday, it is hard to speak out against your coach who you feel controls your future. Your coach has contacts at the next level, he has friends in the organization, he has a history, he has fans, he has influence. Plus, who are you going to talk to? The general manager? The guy who hired the coach in the first place who, if the coach fails, reflects negatively on him? Players find believe they have a choice of speaking out and risking their careers or staying silent and just dealing with it.

Players have to have some sort of outlet outside of a team to report these things so that it is clear this will not come back to negatively affect them.

Nick Crawford writes: With the upcoming contract negotiations for Nicklas Backstrom, Braden Holtby and Alex Ovechkin, is it at all possible that the Caps will be able to sign all three?

Not without significant cuts to the rest of the roster.

Look, never say never. I thought there was no way the team could afford to re-sign T.J. Oshie. I thought there was no money for the team to make any offseason additions this year. If Brian MacLellan wants to sign all three and all three want to come back, then he will find a way to get it done.

My point through all of this is that I don't think Holtby will be re-signed because I don't think it makes sense. You can only protect one goalie in the Seattle draft, Holtby is going to command a gigantic cap hit and keeping him means making a lot of cuts elsewhere on the roster and selling the 22-year-old Ilya Sasmonov because you can't keep both. Does it really make sense to do that for a 30-year-old Holtby?

Can the Caps re-sign all three? If they really want to, sure. Will they? I highly, highly doubt it.

Craig Boden writes: Alex Ovechkin is now 34 years old, he's got to start slowing down soon. Does the big man get to 50 goals again this year and what's the chances of him getting even close to Gretzky's record?

Ovechkin very well could get 50 goals again this season. I have been consistent in my belief that he will fall just short of 50 this year, but it is not because I see him as slowing down. Getting 50 goals is hard to do consistently and I just think he falls short this year. He is currently on pace for about 54 so we will see.

Catching Gretzky's record remains a long shot.

Let's say Ovechkin stays on this pace all season and finishes with 54 goals. That will give him 712 in his career. He would still have to score 185 more goals to pass Gretzky. If he plays five more seasons, he would have to average 37 goals per year to get there. Yes, that sounds low for Ovechkin but at some point he is going to slow down and I don't see a 38, 39-year-old Ovechkin scoring 40 goals.

Ovechkin will probably have to have another big season -- 50 goals or close to it -- after this year to really make a run at it.

Even if he doesn't get there though, the fact that we are even talking about this is remarkable. Gretzky's goal record is one of those records I thought to be untouchable. Ovechkin has made this record impossible to beat to improbable which is a mammoth achievement.

Emily Fon-Kats: What are some pre-game rituals?

Hockey superstitions can be bizarre. Some players guard them very closely while others are more open about it. I wrote about this in January, check out the story here.

Andre Burakovsky was the weirdest. And of course, there's also the Oshie butt taps

All of this is just the tip of the iceberg, by the way. There are so many more that we never see or hear about.

Richard Strickland writes: Does Braden Holtby get bored during a slow game?

Bored is not the right word. Going "cold" is a real thing for goalies and Holtby is someone who prefers to be busy. He definitely feels like he does better against more shots. Even if he knows he is not playing that night, he will take more shots in practice.

I would not say bored. Perhaps antsy would be a better way to describe it. It is is just how he is wired.

Jason Woodside writes: I don’t see why a team that scores on a delayed penalty doesn’t still get awarded a power play. Any chance the league ever looks into changing this?

Actually yes. You are not the first person I have heard suggest this. In the league's endless pursuit of more offense, awarding a power play after a goal is scored is a pretty simple change that would not dramatically change the game. I am not sure how much it would actually impact goal-scoring league-wide as it does not happen very often, but this would be a minor change in the grand scheme of things.

I would not at all be surprised if we see a change like this to the rules.

I recently read an article about hockey dentists. How many behind the scenes coaches/staff are present for games vs the amount that would be there for a practice day? Are these roles only there for home games or do they travel?

If you are referring to the ESPN article on hockey dentists, I saw that too. It was a great read.

This is not a subject I am too familiar with, but I will tell you what little I do know about it. First, the Caps list eight team doctors as members of its medical staff. There is a head team physician/orthopedic surgeon, another orthopedic surgeon, two internists, an emergency physician, an emergency medicine physician and internist, an ophthalmologist and a dentist. These "team" doctors are all full-time doctors who just have a relationship with the team. The only medical personnel who are full-time employees of a team are the athletic trainers. In fact, most team doctors around the league don't get paid. They get to say they are the official doctor, dentist surgeon, etc. of whatever team they work with and go to the games, but most are not paid. I do not know the specific relationship between the Caps and their medical personnel so I couldn't tell you if they are paid or not.

Because of that, unless there is a reason they need to be there they are not on hand for practice. They have their own jobs they need to tend to. The same goes for travel. It is not as if every road trip the Caps pack the plane with a dentist, a physician, a surgeon and other personnel. That's not really how it works. If there is a medical emergency on the road, they would rely on whatever medical personnel are at the arena they are visiting.

Thanks for all your questions! If you have a question you want to be answered in the next mailbag, you can submit it here at the Capitals Mailbag submissions page on NBCSportsWashington.com.

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Capitals at Ducks Game 31: Time, TV Channel, Live Stream, how to watch

Capitals at Ducks Game 31: Time, TV Channel, Live Stream, how to watch

These teams faced off just two weeks ago, and things got a little crazy. Fists flew, punches were thrown, and tensions were high. 

The Washington Capitals are eager to seal this road trip with what would be their sixth consecutive victory (and ultimately staying 1.00 on this trip westward). 

Atop the league standings and sitting seventh-to-last respectively, the Capitals and Ducks are at very different points nearly two months in to the 2019-2020 NHL season.

Anaheim is 12-12-4 after beating the LA Kings 4-2 Monday night, the only team they are doing better than in the Pacific Division. The Ducks face a crucial point to spur some upward momentum, but will be met by swift Capitals offense (+26 differential so far this season) as well as Norris contender John Carlson, who scored his 100th and 101st career goals in Los Angeles Wednesday night against the Kings. 

CAPITALS-DUCKS GAME 31: HOW TO WATCH

What: Washington Capitals vs. Anaheim Ducks

Where: The Honda Center, Anaheim, CA

When: Friday, December 6, 2019 at 10 PM ET

TV Channel: Capitals-Ducks will be broadcast on NBC Sports Washington Plus. (NBC Sports Washington channel finder)

Live Stream: You can watch the Capitals-Ducks game on NBC Sports Washington's live stream page.

Radio: Caps Radio 24/7

CAPITALS-DUCKS TV SCHEDULE:

9:00 PM: Caps Faceoff Live (LIVE)
9:30 PM: Caps Pregame Live (LIVE)
10:00 PM: NHL: Capitals @ Anaheim Ducks (LIVE) [NBC Sports Washington Plus]
12:30 AM: Caps Postgame Live (LIVE) [NBC Sports Washington Plus]

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