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Constantly adjusting Lannan ready to rejoin Nats rotation

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Constantly adjusting Lannan ready to rejoin Nats rotation

NEW YORK -- The 2012 baseball season has featured one unexpected turn after another for John Lannan, so it's perhaps appropriate the left-hander's return to the Nationals rotation will come at a time and place nobody expected.

Though he was promoted from Class AAA Syracuse on Sept. 1, Lannan wasn't supposed to make his first start for the Nationals until this weekend in Atlanta. But then the club decided to shut down Stephen Strasburg five days earlier than planned, so now Lannan finds himself preparing to start tomorrow night's series finale against the Mets.

He hasn't appeared in a game since his Aug. 30 start for Syracuse, but he's tried to keep himself on something of a regular routine entering this outing.

"We're just gonna act like I skipped a start," he said. "I didn't pitch, but I followed my routine. I had a pretty good one going, so I just kept on doing that. Got my lifts in, did my running, did everything necessary. I threw three bullpens. I just acted as if I skipped a couple starts, and now I'm pretty much on the routine as if I was pitching Wednesday. So it worked out."

Lannan has gotten used to adapting to unexpected challenges. After assuming he'd be in the Nationals' Opening Day rotation, he learned on April 3 he was instead being shipped to the minors despite his 5 million salary and big-league track record. After initially requesting a trade, he set about trying to work his way back to D.C., ultimately earning two summer starts during doubleheaders.

Lannan won both of those games and was given assurances he would return in September to take Strasburg's rotation spot. He tried not to anticipate when exactly that would take place, and that approach probably paid off because he's now starting several days earlier than expected.

Lannan's last two starts at Syracuse -- back-to-back shutouts -- were by far his best of the season, but he's being careful not to assume that success will immediately carry-over into a big-league pennant race.

"It just doesn't translate," he said. "It is what it is down there, but it's a whole different mindset right now. I just tried to stay as fresh as I could in the bullpens. I knew I couldn't create what I'm going to feel on Wednesday. But looking forward to something, the last bullpen I threw, the mentality changed."

A Long Island native, Lannan will have family on hand for tomorrow's game. It's his first start at Citi Field since April 10, 2010, when he beat the Mets, 4-3, and it comes five months after he thought he'd pitch here in the fifth game of this season.

"I was supposed to make my first start here, when I was supposedly in the rotation," he noted. "So it's kind of crazy that I'm making this start now."

It's easy to think of Lannan stepping in as a fresh arm to take over for a tiring Strasburg, but the 27-year-old has thrown 161 23 innings over 26 starts combined starts between Syracuse and Washington this season. He insists he remains physically strong for the stretch run.

"I feel great," he said. "Obviously I ended the season strong at Syracuse, and I felt good those last two starts. I threw 122 pitches in my last start. Obviously it's different; I'm not throwing in front of 200 people here, so the adrenaline is probably more up here than it is down there. It's just something that happens.

"It feels great, because I haven't been in a lot of pressure situations down there. But I'm ready."

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Tom Verducci gives more specifics on Bryce Harper's 2016 injury

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Tom Verducci gives more specifics on Bryce Harper's 2016 injury

Entering 2016, Bryce Harper was ready to take over the world. After putting forth one of the most impressive offensive seasons in recent memory in 2015, he was rewarded by being named the youngest unanimous MVP in the history of baseball. The following season, he was prepared to take another step forward.

Instead, he slashed .243/.373/.441 with 24 home runs, and questions abounded about why he was struggling.

Sports Illustrated’s Tom Verducci, one of baseball’s most accomplished reporters, wrote a story late in the season about how Harper had suffered a shoulder injury, according to a source. The Nationals vehemently denied these reports at the time, claiming that their doctors were not aware of any medical issues with Harper’s shoulder. Mike Rizzo said he asked Harper directly if he was hurt and was told no.

At this year’s Winter Meetings, Verducci spoke with NBC Sports Washington, and he doubled down on his reporting.

“2016, of course, that’s when he injured his shoulder. It was a slide in Milwaukee, about one-third of the way into the season, was never quite the same.”

Whereas in 2016 Verducci simply referred to “a source,” it appears this information came from Harper directly.

“As he told me,” Verducci says, “He could not lift weights upper-body wise through the rest of that season, he lost weight, didn’t have the same kind of power. He was compromised even throwing on defense, he had to compromise by playing much more shallow.”

“The numbers in ‘16 really are a function of the injury.”

One concern Nats fans have about signing Harper to a major deal is how his numbers in the post-MVP years have failed to match 2015. According to Baseball-Reference, his combined Wins Above Replacement total from 2016-18 is 7.5. His bWAR in 2015 alone was 10.0. Still, Harper never had an OPS+ below 114 in that stretch. Even his “down” seasons would still be considered quality years for most big league hitters.

Harper is also just now entering his prime, however, so presumably many of his best seasons are still to come. For one MLB insider, at least, there’s no real cause for concern about a long term deal as long as Harper can stay healthy.

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The case for the Phillies as the frontrunner for Bryce Harper, according to Tim Kurkjian

The case for the Phillies as the frontrunner for Bryce Harper, according to Tim Kurkjian

Well, this is not what Nationals fans want to hear. 

There is no bigger buzz at MLB's Winter Meetings in Las Vegas than where free agents Bryce Harper and Manny Machado will sign. Tim Kurkjian, one of the most respected baseball analysts, believes that Harper will stay in the NL East, but sign with the Philadelphia Phillies, not with the Nationals. 

"I think the most logical landing spot for Bryce Harper is the Phillies," Kurkjian said. "The Phillies have a lot of money and they are willing to spend it. They've made that abundently clear."

The Nationals offered Harper a 10-year, $300 million extension on the last day of the 2018 regular season. As expected, he declined.

Aside from that ability to offer the 26-year-old a very large contract, Kurkjian thinks that Philadelphia makes perfect sense in Harper for purely baseball reasons. Phillies manager Gabe Kapler is also fascinated by what Harper would bring to the table.

"They also have a tremendous need [in the outfield]. They played really well for three or four months last year, but the last two months were not good," Kurkjian said. "That club needs a middle of the order hitter, and they need a star hitter to build around, and Bryce Harper fits that category."

The Phillies have also been rumored to have interest in Machado, but after a recent trade, they may shift their focus more towards Harper.

"[The Phillies] already traded for Jean Segura, a pretty good hitting shortstop," Kurkjian said. "Which means they should, at least to me, be less engaged on Manny Machado and more engaged on Bryce Harper."

Segura hit .304 for the Seattle Mariners in 2018 and was selected to the AL All-Star team.

Of course, Kurkjian is only speculating at this point, as no one will know where Harper ends up until he inks pen to the paper. Each day, there is a new story.

"This story doesn't change by the day, it changes by the hour," Kurkjian said. "But at this hour, I will say, the Phillies look to me to be the best fit for Bryce Harper."

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