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Nats 2012 minor league awards

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Nats 2012 minor league awards

Syracuse Chiefs (70-74, 9th in International League)
Best Hitter: OF Corey Brown (.285 BA, 25 HR, 71 RBI, 83 R)Best Pitcher: LHP Zach Duke (15-5, 3.51 ERA, 164.1 IP)Biggest Surprise: RHP Christian Garcia (1-1, 0.56 ERA, 14 SV)

Brought in via a trade with the Athletics, Brown has perhaps been the best return in the deal that sent Josh Willingham to Oakland for Henry Rodriguez. The 26-year-old outfielder was at Syracuse last season, but this year has nearly doubled his offensive production. He led the Chiefs in homers, runs, walks, RBI, and triples, and also ranked second in stolen bases. He is now with the Nats as a September call-up and could be a late-bloomer that finds a permanent place at the major league level next season.

Duke is another September call-up after having a bounce back season with Syracuse. The Chiefs had trouble with inconsistency on the mound overall, but Duke himself was their most reliable starter. He led the team in wins with 15 and had the best ERA in the rotation. Duke also pitched two complete games with one of them being a shutout.

We could go a few ways with the teams biggest surprise, but the best choice is another Nationals September call-up in reliever Christian Garcia. A third round pick in 2004 by the Yankees, Garcia is finally at the major league level after undergoing Tommy John surgery twice. At 27 years old he is starting to find his way and looked well above his competition while at Triple-A.

Harrisburg Senators (64-78, 9th in Eastern League)Best Hitter: OF Chris Rahl (.291 BA, 12 HR, 50 RBI, 55 R, 26 SB)Best Pitcher: LHP Danny Rosenbaum (8-10, 3.94 ERA, 155.1 IP)Biggest Surprise: RHP Ryan Perry (2-4, ERA, 1.19 WHIP, 114.1 IP)

Rahl last played on July 27 due to a foot injury, but still remained atop most of the Senators offensive categories. He finished first in runs and RBI and placed second to Tim Pahuta in homers.

Rosenbaum was a workhorse for the Senators staff and earns Best Pitcher despite having struggled to an extent at Double-A. He was the best pitcher for Potomac last season and didnt have the same level of success at Harrisburg, but maintained a good ERA and logged a lot of innings.

Perry is a former first round pick of the Tigers who came to Washington in an offseason trade for Colin Balester. The flame-throwing right-hander spent time with the big league club in May as a reliever, but struggled and was demoted when other guys got healthy. The Nats have decided to convert him to a starter and the results thus far have been great. If he can continue with a sub-3.00 ERA in the minors, he just might realize the immense potential that made him a first round draft choice.

Potomac Nationals (64-75, 6th in Carolina League)Best Hitter: OF Kevin Keyes (.223 BA, 21 HR, 78 RBI, 27 2B)Best Pitcher: RHP Nathan Karns (8-4, 2.26 ERA, 87 SO, 71.2 IP)Biggest Surprise: LHP Robbie Ray (4-12, 4.87 ERA, 27 BB, 64.2 IP)

The Nats picked Keyes in the seventh round of the 2010 MLB Draft and this year at Potomac he found his power stroke. Keyes had a monster second half of the season with seven homers in July and five in August. He finished leading the team in home runs, RBI, and ranked second in doubles.

The 24-year-old Karns was named the Nationals minor league pitcher of the year just this week after thriving in the second half with Potomac. He finished second on the team with eight wins despite pitching nearly half the innings of the team-leader in that category, Matthew Grace with nine. He posted a ton of strikeouts and kept guys off base with an impressive 1.02 WHIP.

Ray was the biggest surprise in our mid-season awards and he continued to deserved the distinction in the second half. In fact, since we published that story he posted a 1-7 record and continued his season to forget. He had his worst month of all in August when he went 0-5 with a 15.51 ERA in five appearances. It is an unfortunate trend for a prospect who held a 3.13 ERA through 89.0 innings at Hagerstown just a year ago.

Hagerstown Suns (82-55, 2nd in South Atlantic League)Best Hitter: 3B Matthew Skole (.286 BA, 27 HR, 92 RBI, 94 BB, 1.013 OPS)Best Pitcher: RHP Alex Meyer (7-4, 3.10 ERA, 107 SO, 90.0 IP)Biggest Surprise: LHP Christian Meza (8-1, 2.97 ERA, 88.0 IP, 94 SO)

The 22-year-old Skole was just named the Nationals minor league player of the year just days after earning MVP honors in the South Atlantic League. Picked in the 5th round just last year, Skole has developed quickly into one of the best hitters in the minor leagues. He earned a late-season promotion to Potomac and should be one to watch for next season as he continues his rise through the system.

Meyer made just one more start with Hagerstown after our mid-season awards before moving on to Potomac, but his time their deserves the honor as Best Pitcher. The 69 former first round pick showed quickly he could dominate low Single-A hitters and should also rise quickly through the Nats farm system.

The 22-year-old Meza was picked by the Nationals in the 25th round of the 2010 MLB Draft and just this season got his first of Single-A ball after spending the previous season with the Auburn Doubledays. In 36 appearances with the Suns he posted a nice sub-3.00 ERA and showed he can attack batters with a high strikeout rate.

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National League All-Star Game Roster Projection: How it will all break down

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USA Today Sports

National League All-Star Game Roster Projection: How it will all break down

In less than a month, the 2018 MLB All-Star game will take place at Nationals Park.

There are plenty of details that still need ironing out, but none are more important than the 64 players that will be taking the field at the Midsummer Classic.

Surely the Washington Nationals are hoping that many of their hometown stars will make the cut.

So, lets clear the air. How are the MLB All-Star rosters created? Well it is a combination of the fan vote, the player ballots, and the MLB Commissioners Office. No, it is not a 33-33-33 split, but rather a political (yet fair) process. Here is how it shakes out for there to be 32 players on each team:

  • Fan vote: eight position players in NL/ nine in AL (DH); plus final vote for each league
  • Player’s ballots: next 16 players in NL; 17 players in AL (five starting pitchers, three relievers must be chosen)
  • MLB Commissioner’s Office: seven NL players (four pitchers, three position players) and five AL players (four pitchers, one position player)

Keep in mind, the MLB Commissioner’s Office merely is just there to ensure that there is one representative from all 30 MLB teams. Additionally, the player’s ballots are generally in-line with statistics and name recognition.

So let’s see how this shakes out for the National League All-Star Game roster. This factors in the latest fan vote returns:

National League All-Star Roster Projection:

C – Buster Posey, Giants (Fan Vote), Wilson Contreras, Cubs (Player Ballot)
1B – Freddie Freeman, Braves (Fan Vote), Jose Martinez, Cardinals (Player Ballot), Justin Bour, Marlins (Commissioner’s Office)
2B – Ozzie Albies, Braves (Fan Vote), Scooter Gennett, Reds (Player Ballot)
3B – Nolan Arenado, Rockies (Fan Vote), Kris Bryant, Cubs (Player Ballot)
SS – Brandon Crawford, Giants (Fan Vote), Chris Taylor, Dodgers (Player Ballot)
OF – Nick Markakis, Braves (Fan Vote), Bryce Harper, Nationals (Fan Vote), Matt Kemp (Fan Vote), Albert Almora Jr., Cubs (Player Ballot), Charlie Blackmon, Rockies (Player Ballot), Corey Dickerson, Pirates (Player Ballot), David Peralta, Diamondbacks (Commissioner’s Office), Christian Yelich (Commissioner’s Office)

SP – Max Scherzer, Nationals (Player Ballot), Sean Newcomb, Braves (Player Ballot), Jon Lester, Cubs (Player Ballot), Aaron Nola, Phillies (Player Ballot), Jacob deGrom, Mets (Player Ballot), Mike Foltynewicz, Braves (Commissioner’s Office)

RP – Brad Hand, Padres (Player Ballot), Sean Doolittle, Nationals (Player Ballot), Josh Hader Brewers (Player Ballot), Wade Davis, Rockies (Commissioner’s Office), Kenley Jansen (Commissioner’s Office), Jeremy Jeffress (Commissioner’s Office)

Manager: Dave Roberts, Dodgers

After this, there will be one more player chosen by another fan vote. The MLB Commissioner’s Office, along with the manager, choses five players to be selected in the penultimate vote. 

This puts three Nationals on the All-Star team with the Braves leading the charge with five selections.

Now of course nothing ever goes to plan, but heck its baseball, not everyone will be happy.

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5 things you should know about new Nationals pitcher Kelvin Herrera

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USA TODAY Sports

5 things you should know about new Nationals pitcher Kelvin Herrera

The Nationals traded for Royals' pitcher Kelvin Herrera this evening. 

Not only did the Nationals trade for Kelvin Herrera, but they did so without losing Juan Soto, Victor Robles, or Andrew Stevenson. The first two were never in any real danger of being traded for a relief pitcher who will be a free agent at year's end, but the Nats escaped only giving up their 10th and 11th ranked prospects:

On the surface, this deal looks exceptional for the Nationals. Herrera is another back-of-the-bullpen type that only further deepens the Nats' options in that department. Here are a handful of things you should know about the Nationals' newest pitcher:

1. Herrera's strikeout "issue" is complicated 

Herrera, like many other closers over the last half-decade, has made his name in strikeouts. He topped out at a 30.4 percent strikeout rate in 2016, and has a 23.4 percent clip for his career. His K% this season sits at 23.2 percent, which is both higher than last season and lower than his career average. 

People will look at his dramatic K/9 drop as a red flag, but "per/9" stats are flawed and not generally a worthwhile stat to build an argument around. A pitcher who gets knocked around for five runs in an inning -- but gets three strikeouts -- can have the same K/9 of a different (much more efficient) pitcher who strikes out the side in order. 

2. Herrera has basically stopped walking batters 

His career BB% sits at 7.1 percent. His highest clip is nine percent (2014, 2015) and his lowest was a shade over four percent (2016). 

This season, he's walking batters at a two percent  rate. In 27 games this season, he's walked two batters. Two! 

3. The jury seems to still be out on how good of a year he's had so far

Analytics are frustrating. On one hand, they can serve wonderfully as tools to help peel back the curtains and tell a deeper story - or dispel lazy narratives. On the other hand, they can be contradictory, confusing, and at times downright misleading. 

Take, for instance, Herrera's baseline pitching stats. His ERA sits at 1.05, while his FIP sits at 2.62. On their own, both numbers are impressive. On their own, both numbers are All-Star level stats. 

When you stack them against each other, however, the picture turns negative. While ERA is the more common stat, it's widely accepted that FIP more accurately represents a pitcher's true value (ERA's calculation makes the same per/9 mistakes that were mentioned above). 

More often than not, when a pitcher's ERA is lower than his FIP, that indicates said pitcher has benefited from luck. 

Throw in a 3.51 xFIP (which is the same as FIP, but park-adjusted) and we suddenly have a real mess on our hands. Is he the pitcher with the great ERA, the pitcher with the Very Good FIP, or the pitcher with the medicore xFIP? 

4. He was a fastball pitcher, and then he wasn't, and now he is again

Take a look at Herrera's pitch usage over his career in Kansas City:

In only three years, he's gone from throwing a sinker 31 percent of the time to completely giving up on the pitch. That's pretty wild. 

Since 2014, he's gone to the slider more and more in every year. 

His current fastball usage would be the highest of his career. He only appeared in two games during the 2011 season, so those numbers aren't reliable. Going away from the sinker probably helps explain why his Ground Ball rate has dropped 10 percentage points, too. 

5. The Nats finally have the bullpen they've been dreaming about for years

Doolittle, Herrera, Kintzler, and Madson is about as deep and talented as any bullpen in baseball.

Justin Miller, Sammy Solis, and Wander Suero all have flashed serious potential at points throughout the year. Austin Voth is waiting for roster expansion in September. 

The Nats have been trying to build this type of bullpen for the better part of the last decade. Health obviously remains an important factor, but Rizzo's got the deepest pen of his time in D.C. 

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