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Back when he was 'young and dumb,' Santana Moss had 11 cars

Back when he was 'young and dumb,' Santana Moss had 11 cars

Santana Moss' NFL resume has some pretty impressive numbers on it: 14 years in the league, 732 career catches and 66 total touchdowns are all major accomplishments.

During a Monday appearance with the Sports Junkies, though, he revealed something even crazier: He once owned 11 cars.

Eleven. Cars. 

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"I call that my young and dumb era," Moss said. "I was just young, dumb, wanting to have some fun."

Here's the full list, which he somehow was able to remember. Originally, he said he had 10, but in the midst of recounting them, he figured out it was actually 11:

1) Hummer H2

2) 1975 Chevy Caprice

3) 1971 Chevy Impala 

4) Mercedes Benz S500

5) Dodge Ram pickup (because "he just wanted something different.")

6) BMW X5

7) Dodge Magnum

8) BMW 750  

9) Escalade

10) Bentley

11) 1996 Chevy Impala (which he gave away to his cousin).

Nowadays, he's cut that number down by more than half, and says he only has five cars. That garage must be feeling pretty empty compared to how full it once was.

Watch the incredible full segment in the video player above.

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Washington WR Kelvin Harmon hopes his comeback season is similar to Adrian Peterson's

Washington WR Kelvin Harmon hopes his comeback season is similar to Adrian Peterson's

Washington's wide receiver depth took a crucial blow on Tuesday, when rising second-year pass-catcher Kelvin Harmon announced he had surgery last week to repair a torn ACL, and thus, will miss the 2020 season.

However, rather than dwelling on his current status, Harmon took to Twitter to say he's already focused on his comeback season in 2021. And luckily for the wideout, there's someone in the team's locker room he can look to for support on how to overcome the devastating knee injury, as well as how to come back even better than before.

What Harmon is referring to is current Washington running back Adrian Peterson's 2012 season, when the now 35-year-old was the suiting up for the Minnesota Vikings. In Week 16 of the 2011 season, Peterson ruptured his ACL (ironically at FedEx Field), leaving many to wonder if the running back would ever return to the dominant form he was prior to the injury.

Yet, the future Hall of Famer fully recovered from his ACL injury in less than eight months, missing no regular-season games in the process. Peterson then put together the best season of his career, rushing for 2,097 yards (just eight short of Eric Dickerson's NFL single-season record) and 12 touchdowns while leading Minnesota to the playoffs.

Additionally, Peterson earned MVP honors that season, which is the last time a non-QB has taken home the award.

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Prior to Tuesday's announcement, Harmon was poised for a breakout second season with Washington. The wideout came onto the scene late for Washington as a rookie, notching 23 of his 30 catches a season ago after Dwayne Haskins became the starting quarterback.

Plus, Harmon had earned plenty of praise from his teammates this offseason and was expected to compete for the team's No. 2 pass-catcher opposite of Terry McLaurin.

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For Harmon, returning with a 2012 Peterson-like season next year is a high bar to set for himself, especially since the running back's effort that year was one of the best single-seasons by an individual in the league's history.

But perhaps by having Peterson by his side, Harmon can snag a few tips from the running back to set himself up for a stellar 2021 season in Washington.

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Kevin Blackistone on Dan Snyder: 'He’s either got to change the name or get out of the league'

Kevin Blackistone on Dan Snyder: 'He’s either got to change the name or get out of the league'

Following Washington's statement on Monday that the current team name would be retired, The Washington Post Columnist and ESPN panelist Kevin Blackistone shared his problems with the release on Twitter.

On Monday during an interview on ESPN 92.9FM's Jason & John Show, Blackistone elaborated on the issues he took with the statement.

“My first thought was ‘Where’s the apology?’ My second thought was, ‘This is disingenuous because you still got the letterhead on here with the name just glaring,'" Blackistone said.

Blackistone, who is also a professor at the University of Maryland, had mentioned the non-existent apology in his tweet. The fact that the team name and logo which are being retired were still used in a release describing the change that was coming made him believe that the team truly didn't care. That is something Blackistone feels became even more evident when one considers how the new team name is being chosen.

Among all the options for Washington's moniker -- which is meant to honor the heritage and tradition of the franchise -- that have been considered, Blackistone noted that to his knowledge the Native American community has reportedly not been involved much in the decision.

"And my third thought was, ‘What do you have to say about the name that you’re considering given that you haven’t even given voice to, or given an ear to, the native folks who you’ve insulted since buying the team 21 years ago and having the opportunity to do this before,'" Blackistone said.

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Blackistone was not along in taking issue with the statement. The Sports Junkies felt it answered no questions, ESPN's Michael Wilbon called it "annoying" and "tone-deaf" and ProFootballTalk's Mike Florio saw it as "one final act of defiance" by team owner Dan Snyder

The combination of all the missing elements from the statement made it less impactful for Blackistone. Despite it being a big moment, there wasn't much to take away from the team's announcement

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That's something that Blackistone believes comes from the reasoning behind the name change in the first place. Washington has heard the backlash about the name for years, but it wasn't until big-name sponsors took issue that impacted the monetary situation of the league that real moves were made. Blackistone sees that as a symbol that Snyder's decision to change the name has nothing to do with right vs. wrong.

“There’s nothing altruistic about what’s going on," Blackistone said about Snyder. "He’s being forced at the point of bayonets to change the team.”

“Basically sponsors, not individual team sponsors, but sponsors for the team via the NFL," Blackistone said. "Which means, now it’s just not your pockets, but the other 31 owners pockets that are starting to be hurting. That’s why the move is being made." 

All Blackistone had to do to understand Snyder's true opinion on the name change is look back to what the owner has said about the situation in the past. The only difference to Blackistone now is that if Snyder continued to speak in the same manner, some believe it would result in Snyder losing the team.

“This is a guy who seven years ago infamously said he would never change the name, and you could put ‘never’ in caps," Blackistone said. Well, never has come home to roost and he’s either got to change the name or get out of the league.”

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