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Fletcher misses second consecutive practice

fletcher_watching.png

Fletcher misses second consecutive practice

London Fletcher missed a second straight practice on Thursday because of hamstring and head injuries, Coach Mike Shanahan said.

Fletcher left Sunday’s loss to the Giants early in the fourth quarter after straining his right hamstring while dropping back in coverage. A day later, the 37-year-old linebacker began complaining of balance issues as well. 

“We’ve had him, since this morning, with a specialist [being] evaluated for his balance issues,” Shanahan said. 

As of 3:30 p.m., Fletcher was still meeting with the doctor, Shanahan said.

Fletcher has played in 231 consecutive games, the longest such streak among active players. If he does not suit up Sunday in Pittsburgh, that distinction would then belong to Tampa Bay’s Ronde Barber, who will appear in his 231st straight game tonight.

Shanahan, however, was not ready to rule out Fletcher for the Steelers game.

Shanahan said Fletcher has not complained of balance issues in the past. The coach also said he could not pinpoint a specific play that might have caused Fletcher’s condition.

Asked if the linebacker is being evaluated for a concussion, Shanahan said: “He’s being evaluated for his balance issue. That’s why he’s with a specialist. So we can find out what’s wrong. Until he’s evaluated, we don’t know what it is.”

Shanahan said the doctor Fletcher is visiting is a neurologist.

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After seeing Aaron Rodgers go down in 2017, Ha Ha Clinton-Dix knows how to support a backup QB

After seeing Aaron Rodgers go down in 2017, Ha Ha Clinton-Dix knows how to support a backup QB

It's a new team but the same storyline for Ha Ha Clinton-Dix in 2018.

Last year while with the Packers, Clinton-Dix was there as Aaron Rodgers suffered a broken collarbone against the Vikings in Week 6. 

Now a Redskin, the safety is coming off of a game where he and his teammates watched Alex Smith badly break his leg while facing the Texans.

So, in just more than 13 months, he's seen two franchise faces go down with long-term injuries. That means when he talks about how the 'Skins can succeed with Colt McCoy leading the way, he's speaking from experience as opposed to trying to imagine it.

"You just have to rally behind him," Clinton-Dix said Tuesday, just two days before Washington's showdown in Dallas on Thanksgiving. "Colt is a great quarterback, he's a winning quarterback. I have a lot of confidence in him. The way he approaches the game, I have a lot of confidence in that as well."

The defensive back is just the latest to compliment how McCoy prepares, something he's been doing for years now, just waiting for his next opportunity to come up. Now it's here, and Clinton-Dix wants the defense to make things as easy as possible on the passer.

"Find a way to give more," he said about what he can do to contribute from the other side of things.

Rodgers did eventually return for Green Bay, but by that time, an inexperienced Brett Hundley had slogged through a 3-6 record, and the Packers were too far out of the playoff hunt, even for Rodgers.

This time around, McCoy's veteran presence is something that's easing Clinton-Dix's mind. 

"I'm not worried about Colt," he said. "I'm excited to watch him go out and play."

Clinton-Dix was worried about McCoy at one point, though.

The defender played for Alabama from 2011-2013 but was paying attention to the signal caller when Texas squared up with the Crimson Tide in the 2010 BCS National Championship. That was a contest that McCoy had to leave early on after hurting his shoulder.

That exit affected history, according to Clinton-Dix.

"If it wasn't for him getting hurt back when he was playing against the Alabama boys, I'm pretty sure we would've never won that game."

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So your starting QB is injured. What does the front office do next? A former GM explains

So your starting QB is injured. What does the front office do next? A former GM explains

So what happens in the front office when a player like Alex Smith is injured in the middle of a game? Former Washington Redskins general manager Charley Casserly spoke to NBC Sports Washington about what happened in his experience when a player was injured. 

Every Friday, I would have a meeting. I would go through scenarios for every position on our 53-man roster. If we lost any player, what was our scenario? 

This isn’t done in a vacuum – every day, certainly in the offseason, your coaches are involved with personnel. Grading players. You’re talking to your head coach almost every day about players so you know how he thinks. Now, I was never with a head coach that wanted to discuss an emergency list on Friday so I had a pretty good idea of where his thinking was, where our scouts' thinking was going into the game. 

I remember one time when we were in Houston. We lost a nose tackle in the first half and we had his replacement on the plane by the end of the game because it was that cut and dry. We knew who we would sign. And you’re in competition with 31 other teams so you can’t wait around.

Now, sometimes, it’s not cut and dry. You didn’t have a guy in training camp, or you didn’t have a guy who you had worked out earlier in the year.

We’d do that sometimes – we’d bring in guys to work out even though we didn’t need anybody. So we would have the workout done and we would just bring them in. We’d make sure they were still in shape, but we didn’t have to have a tryout of three or four people. So with the Redskins, I’m sure you’re sitting there, you have an emergency list and you go to the emergency list. You talk to the coach right after the game, in this case, and get the coach’s opinion. He may want to get their opinion. And then you’re on the phone and the potential replacement’s on the plane that night. 

They’re operating on a short week, so they have to bring a guy in on Sunday and have him working out on Monday so you can sign him and put him right in the meeting room. Normally, you could do it on Tuesday for a Sunday game. 

Someone from the operations staff picks them up from the airport in a regular car and nobody ever had an issue with that. You bring them in the right before. We give them a written schedule. We put him through a workout – we usually had our coaches work him out. Sometimes if the coaches weren’t available, it would be the scouts. Then he would meet with the position coach. They would at least see the head coach – if we signed him, of course, he’d meet the head coach.

We filmed the workouts, so we could take a look at him. We’d have scouts grade the workouts and write a report on him. The coaches would get a copy of the schedule, they get bios and scouting reports of the players coming in so they would know a bit about him when they met him. 

There’s a simple reason why you work him out. These guys, they have to go right out and practice. We had guys that would come in on Tuesday that couldn’t get through a practice and you want them to go out in practice, so they’re not going to be any good to you – let alone play them in a game. 

Most of the time we’d have him run a 40 and really the second 40, if it was far off his first, it would tell us something about his conditioning. We knew we wouldn’t get top performances because while they were out of camp, you’re not sure what kind of shape he was in. We knew they were all training, but the question is, how hard were they training?

So that’s the procedure. You talk to the agent, usually, there’s not much negotiating in the deal. Who called them varied – oftentimes it was who knew the agent the best. Or it could be the contract negotiator. Or sometimes, when I was the general manager, it could be me.

You sign them to a one-year contract.

It’s usually cut-and-dry because they want to play and many times you don’t have extra money to fool with and they understand that. 

When you bring in a lot of guys to try out, it tells you that it's a true tryout. If you're bringing in two guys, you may bring in two just to bring one in. You may bring in two because you want to be covered in case the one you think you're going with doesn't work out. 

So when you bring in multiple guys (like the Redskins did), it tells you it's true tryout.

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