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How Redskins' draft picks could mesh in already packed defensive backfield

How Redskins' draft picks could mesh in already packed defensive backfield

The Redskins’ defensive backfield was crowded before the NFL draft. After the team grabbed two corners and two safeties, there will be a lot of sorting out to do between now and when the season starts in September.

Here are the four defensive backs they took on Friday and Saturday:

  • CB Fabian Moreau, taken in the third round out of UCLA, was a borderline first-round guy before he suffered a torn pectoral muscle lifting weights during his pro day. I’m not quite sure exactly what pumping iron at his pro day does for a cornerback’s draft stock, but that’s water under the bridge. Moreau said that he will be ready for full participation five months from the date of his injury, which was March 22. That will be August 22, when the Redskins are getting ready to play in preseason game No. 3.

RELATED: Grading the Redskins 2017 draft

  • In the fourth round, they took Montae Nicholson, a safety out of Michigan State who showed well at the combine but not on game tape. It’s hard to see him contributing much this year, but perhaps they can coach up the 6-2 prospect.
  • Both of their seventh-round picks were DB’s. First, they took Louisville S Josh Harvey-Clemons, who is 6-4. His NFL.com draft profile compares him to Kam Chancellor, but before he starts making Pro Bowls, he must stay on the field. Multiple failed drug tests got him kicked out of Georgia.
  • CB Joshua Hosley was a four-year starter at Auburn. It would not be shocking to see him compete for the slot corner job, which was an area of weakness for the team last year.

These players will have to fight their way onto the roster that already had 13 defensive backs with NFL experience.

Cornerbacks:

  • Josh Norman (69 NFL games)
  • Bashaud Breeland (45)
  • Kendall Fuller (13)
  • Quinton Dunbar (25)
  • Dashaun Phillips (11)
  • Tharold Simon (20)

Safeties:

  • Su’a Cravens (11)
  • D.J. Swearinger (59)
  • DeAngelo Hall (166)
  • Will Blackmon (96)
  • Deshazor Everett (27)
  • Josh Evans (49)
  • Earl Wolff (18)

It’s early to have a good handle how the depth chart will shake out. Last year, they kept six cornerbacks and five safeties on their initial 53-man roster. They may be able to stretch that to a total of 12 defensive backs, but no more than that will stay around.

At safety, the question is will the Redskins go young or lean toward keeping more experience? Will Nicholson and/or Harvey-Clemons make the team at the expense of Hall and/or Blackmon? Or will Everett be the odd man out?

If they keep six cornerbacks, the decisions to not appear to be as tough. Moreau and Hosley could join Norman, Breeland, Fuller and Dunbar.

We will see how things unfold. Injuries are almost always a factor and someone could be thrust into a much bigger role than anticipated. Moreau’s pec may not heal on schedule, making him a candidate to start the season on the PUP list.

In any case, there should be a lot of fun competition in the back end of the defense during OTAs and minicamp and in Richmond once training camp gets underway.

MORE REDSKINS: Three reasons to like the pick of Ryan Anderson 

Stay up to date on the Redskins! Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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Charley Casserly learned a lot from the late Bobby Mitchell

Charley Casserly learned a lot from the late Bobby Mitchell

As the Washington Redskins family continues to mourn the passing of the legendary Bobby Mitchell, former GM Charley Casserly weighed in on how much he took away from knowing Mitchell.

“Bobby Mitchell was a dear friend and mentor to me during my time with the Washington Redskins,” Casserly begins. “He took me under his wing. He taught me scouting.”

Casserly first met Mitchell when the former was just an intern getting his start in the business. Rather than push him aside, Mitchell imparted upon Casserly the importance of attitude and demeanor.

“He taught me how to be a professional in the workplace,” the former GM continued. “He cared about people in the community. That’s what, to me, separated him from many other people.”

Mitchell’s longest-lasting impact is his role as one of the first players of color to integrate the Redskins back in 1962, but his role as a mentor and friend to so many in the Washington area lives on as well.

As Casserly says, Mitchell is sorely missed already.

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Brian Mitchell was 'truly impressed' by Redskins legend Bobby Mitchell: Great football player, better human being

Brian Mitchell was 'truly impressed' by Redskins legend Bobby Mitchell: Great football player, better human being

Hall of Famer Bobby Mitchell died on Sunday at the age of 84, according to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Mitchell, who became the first black player on the Redskins when he was traded to Washington in 1962, had a significant impact on another former Redskin, Brian Mitchell, both on and off the field. 

“He was a great football player but I think 25,000 times more of a human being,” said Brian, who was drafted by the Redskins in 1990. 

As Brian grew closer with the Hall of Famer, he was especially impressed by his efforts to fight for equality in the African American community.

“I knew that he was the first African American to come to D.C. and play, but then when I began to find out more about him he was the guy that was out there fighting, a social activist, doing things to help out our black community, which truly truly impressed me,” Brian expressed.

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Brian took great pride in not only knowing the Hall of Famer but having the same last name. 

“I remember someone asking if I was a relative and he said 'no.' And then he told me, he said ‘every time you ran another touchdown, I was like he’s a cousin. Oh, that’s my boy, that’s my son,” Brian said. 

To this day Brian strives to be as influential as Bobby was.

“This one man who did so much had so much impact on so many people throughout this community, it said a lot to me. He’s going to be sorely missed. We love you Bobby, take care,” Brian said.

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