Redskins

Quick Links

Redskins win over Eagles came down to two pivotal passes

Redskins win over Eagles came down to two pivotal passes

PHILADELPHIA—There are a lot of plays that might determine the outcome of a football game. But you can make a pretty good case that the Redskins’ win over the Eagles would not have happened if not for two pass plays, one long, one short.

The long one came in the third quarter. Late in the second period the Redskins drove for a touchdown to take a 7-6 lead but Philadelphia came right back and scored a TD just before halftime to take a 13-7 lead into the locker room. On the Redskins’ second possession of the half they had second and nine at their own 20. Kirk Cousins dropped back and launched one deep for DeSean Jackson.

More Redskins: FIVE OBSERVATIONS FROM THE REDSKINS' NARROW WIN OVER THE EAGLES

“We got just the coverage we wanted,” said Cousins. “It was a great call by Sean [McVay] to give us that play against that coverage.”

It worked just like it was drawn up by the McVay. Jackson got a few steps on his defender, Cousins threw the pass, and, after an adjustment to the ball in the air, Jackson was able to haul it in and complete the 80-yard touchdown play.

“He has a few elite traits and one of them is his ability to track the ball in the air,” said Cousins. “If it’s not an easy catch he can go find it and track the ball better than most receivers and certainly better than most defensive backs.”

Now in five games against his former team, Jackson has three with over 100 yards receiving and touchdown receptions of 80 and 81 yards.

“I wish I could do it every game if you ask me,” said Jackson when asked if he got particular pleasure out of playing well against the team that employed him from 2008-2013. “I’ve just been fortunate that I’ve been able to come back and make some big plays against my former team but regardless of who it is I enjoy doing it.”

Jackson’s long catch would have been an interesting stat line in a loss if the Redskins had not connected on another, much shorter pass with time running out in the fourth quarter. The Redskins were down by two and facing fourth and one at the Eagles 35 with three minutes left. They called timeout to make sure they had the right play in.

Cousins dropped back and fired to Pierre Garçon to his right. The receiver got between cornerback Leodis McKelvin and the ball and secured the catch for the critical first down.

“It was a big play because if we don’t get it we lose the game,” said Cousins. “I think the other point is that Pierre does a great job winning versus man coverage . . . He had a tough job there but he did it and made a great catch and we were able to move the chains.”

Had they failed to get the first down the Eagles would have been able to run some clock. If the Redskins had gotten the ball back it likely would have been far from the goal line with very little time remaining. As it was, two plays later Chris Thompson scored the winning touchdown on a 25-yard run.

“He’s so strong, even if the cornerback is on him he has a great ability to come back to the quarterback and use his body and his strong hands to make those tough catches,” said Gruden.

A loss would not have killed the Redskins’ chances of making the playoffs but it would have put a severe damper on them. They remain legitimate playoff contenders, thanks to one long pass and one short one.

Gallery: NFL WEEK 14: REDSKINS 27, EAGLES 22

Quick Links

Charley Casserly learned a lot from the late Bobby Mitchell

Charley Casserly learned a lot from the late Bobby Mitchell

As the Washington Redskins family continues to mourn the passing of the legendary Bobby Mitchell, former GM Charley Casserly weighed in on how much he took away from knowing Mitchell.

“Bobby Mitchell was a dear friend and mentor to me during my time with the Washington Redskins,” Casserly begins. “He took me under his wing. He taught me scouting.”

Casserly first met Mitchell when the former was just an intern getting his start in the business. Rather than push him aside, Mitchell imparted upon Casserly the importance of attitude and demeanor.

“He taught me how to be a professional in the workplace,” the former GM continued. “He cared about people in the community. That’s what, to me, separated him from many other people.”

Mitchell’s longest-lasting impact is his role as one of the first players of color to integrate the Redskins back in 1962, but his role as a mentor and friend to so many in the Washington area lives on as well.

As Casserly says, Mitchell is sorely missed already.

Stay connected to the Capitals and Wizards with the MyTeams app. Click here to download for comprehensive coverage of your teams.

MORE REDSKINS NEWS

Quick Links

Brian Mitchell was 'truly impressed' by Redskins legend Bobby Mitchell: Great football player, better human being

Brian Mitchell was 'truly impressed' by Redskins legend Bobby Mitchell: Great football player, better human being

Hall of Famer Bobby Mitchell died on Sunday at the age of 84, according to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Mitchell, who became the first black player on the Redskins when he was traded to Washington in 1962, had a significant impact on another former Redskin, Brian Mitchell, both on and off the field. 

“He was a great football player but I think 25,000 times more of a human being,” said Brian, who was drafted by the Redskins in 1990. 

As Brian grew closer with the Hall of Famer, he was especially impressed by his efforts to fight for equality in the African American community.

“I knew that he was the first African American to come to D.C. and play, but then when I began to find out more about him he was the guy that was out there fighting, a social activist, doing things to help out our black community, which truly truly impressed me,” Brian expressed.

CLICK HERE TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE REDSKINS TALK PODCAST

Brian took great pride in not only knowing the Hall of Famer but having the same last name. 

“I remember someone asking if I was a relative and he said 'no.' And then he told me, he said ‘every time you ran another touchdown, I was like he’s a cousin. Oh, that’s my boy, that’s my son,” Brian said. 

To this day Brian strives to be as influential as Bobby was.

“This one man who did so much had so much impact on so many people throughout this community, it said a lot to me. He’s going to be sorely missed. We love you Bobby, take care,” Brian said.

Stay connected to the Capitals and Wizards with the MyTeams app. Click here to download for comprehensive coverage of your teams.

MORE REDSKINS NEWS: