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Redskins WR Robert Davis had to learn to run block in high school

Redskins WR Robert Davis had to learn to run block in high school

The Redskins have their share of former five-star recruits on their roster. Wide receiver Robert Davis, drafted in the sixth round last week, is not one of them.

Davis is a good athlete with speed (4.44 in the 40 at the combine) and at 6-4 he has the size that should attract attention. But at Warner Robins High School in Georgia, Davis did not do much of the main thing that college coaches want wide receivers to do—catch passes.

RELATED: Grading the Redskins 2017 draft

“I went to a triple option high school, where that was the only thing we did. I only caught eight passes my high school career,” said Davis when asked about his run blocking ability. “I mean, blocking was what I did, and I am a skilled blocker.”

That’s not eight in a game or in a month or even in a season. That’s eight the whole time he was in high school.

So if you are wondering why Davis didn’t attract the attention of SEC schools like Georgia and Auburn, there is your answer. Instead he headed to Georgia State.

With the Panthers, Davis proved he could catch footballs. In his career, he caught 222 passes for 3,391 yards. He is the Georgia State all-time leader in both categories, although it must be noted that the program just came into existence in 2010.

MORE REDSKINS: Browns just laughed at report of Redskins-Cousins trade 

Back to the blocking ability, that could be key in him making the team and getting playing time if he does. Even though Ryan Grant is not very productive catching passes he got snaps last year because he can block. If Davis can block and become more productive in the passing game than Grant, that could give him an edge in making the 53 and getting on the field.

Stay up to date on the Redskins! Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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The Redskins' decision with Dwayne Haskins actually isn't that complicated

The Redskins' decision with Dwayne Haskins actually isn't that complicated

The Redskins drafted Dwayne Haskins with the 15th overall pick back in April with one very clear goal in mind: new franchise quarterback. 

What isn't clear, however, is that timeline. 

Eventually, Haskins will be the Redskins starting quarterback. That could happen Week 1 2019, or it could be a year away.

Haskins wasn't particularly impressive during the team's minicamp, and veteran signal caller Case Keenum looked like the better option. Remember, though, real football is more than two months away. The mental aspects of NFL life that Haskins struggled with during the spring sessions, like calling plays and getting to the line of scrimmage in correct formations, are quite fixable. Haskins is smart and has talked about his commitment to learning the playbook. 

If that happens by the time Haskins gets to Richmond, then the quarterback competition will look much different than it did in Ashburn. And the 'Skins don't report to Richmond for another month. 

Here's the reality: Haskins should absolutely compete for the starting quarterback job. That's the minimum expectation for first-round picks. 

The important news: Haskins will compete for the starting job in Richmond. Jay Gruden has been clear about that.

Now, if Haskins doesn't win the job, he can't start. Politics or expectations can't push him into the top spot, no matter what pressure might be applied. 

Football players improve, often dramatically, over the summer. Haskins has all the physical talent needed to take the QB1 spot. He just needs to learn the speed of the NFL, which is challenging, and the depth of the offensive system, which is daunting. 

It's entirely possible Haskins does not win the Redskins starting quarterback job. In fact, it's probable he doesn't, by Week 1 anyway. 

But the notion that he can't start because of a difficult early portion of the schedule is crazy. If Haskins is the best option to win games, Gruden is obligated to give his team the best chance to win a game, regardless of an opponent. 

In a lot of ways, the Redskins decision with Dwayne Haskins is really up to Haskins. Compete and win the job? The decision will be easy. 

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Don't believe dumb Twitter rumors about the Redskins started by fake accounts

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Don't believe dumb Twitter rumors about the Redskins started by fake accounts

Don’t believe dumb internet rumors. Start there. 

Sunday night some fake Twitter accounts tweeted that a trade between the Redskins and Lions was very close, a deal that would ship productive WR Marvin Jones from Detroit to Washington in exchange for unproductive former first-round pick WR Josh Doctson.

What is to believe here? Next to nothing.

Jones is under Lions control for two more seasons and makes about $7 million a year. That’s tremendous value for somebody that posted 1,100 yards and nine touchdowns two seasons ago. Doctson has exactly 1,100 yards in his three-year NFL career. 

There is some speculation that Jones could be on the outs in Detroit, mostly because of the hard charging style of head coach Matt Patricia. Jones also missed half of last season with a knee injury and is still working his way back, missing all of Detroit's offseason work.

Even if Jones is on the outs with Patricia, and there are worries about the knee, he would command more in a trade than Doctson, who only has one year left on his contract. 

This is from Detroit Free Press Lions reporter Dave Birkett's mailbag last week: "Jones has two years left on his contract at very reasonable salaries of $6.5 million per season. The Lions would be foolish to move on from him right now. He provides more than most players at his salary, and it’s not like there are suitable replacements out there. Jones spent all spring working with the rehab group and I expect him to have a strong season this fall. I can’t imagine the Lions moving on from him at this point, unless we hit October and they’re struggling to keep their head above water. If that happens, all bets are off."

This also seems like a pertinent time to mention that Washington team president Bruce Allen spent last week in France. 

Allen makes the trades for the Redskins. Allen is the boss. He was out of the country last week, and probably not fielding trade phone calls from Cannes. 

To be fair, there have been conversations inside Redskins Park about moving Doctson for more than a year, including in the weeks leading up to the trading deadline last season. He hasn't been moved, however, and his trade value is probably at an all-time low after Washington decided not to exercise a fifth-year team option on his contract earlier this offseason. 

Could Marvin Jones help the Redskins' receiving group? Absolutely. 

But a trade requires much more than that.