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RG3 leads decisive drives in Redskins' win over Giants

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RG3 leads decisive drives in Redskins' win over Giants

The Redskins’ season was in the balance when they started a drive at their own 14 with just over three minutes left in the third quarter.

The Giants had just scored on a field goal to take a 16-10 lead. If New York would have been able to hang on they would have had a stranglehold on the NFC East, a three game lead with four to play. Even a wild card spot in the postseason would be very much a longshot for the Redskins if they fell to 5-7.

But, as we have seen all year long, the moment was not too big for quarterback Robert Griffin III. He was asked what his mindset was when they took the huddle at that time.

“Just go score,” he said. “The guys took it to heart.”

Alfred Morris got things started runs of 10 and 16 yards. Griffin scooted around left end for seven. A nine-yard pass to Morgan got them into New York territory at the 41. Hankerson caught a slant for 14 yards that made it first and goal at the eight. Wasting no time, Griffin rolled right and sucked up the defense thinking he was going run. His touchdown pass to Pierre Garçon was an easy toss and the Redskins were up 17-16 with 11 and a half minutes left to play.

Garçon was the target of 11 of the 21 passes Griffin threw and he caught eight for 106 yards.

“He’s supposed to be our guy and he’s playing like it,” said Griffin of the Redskins’ prize free agent acquisition of the offseason.

The 12-play drive didn’t have any tense moments. They didn’t face a single third down and their most challenging down and distance was second and seven.

Just because the drive was relatively easy, though, doesn’t mean that it weren’t some tense moments before the Redskins could post their third straight win.

A sack stopped the Giants’ subsequent possession. The Redskins pushed into Giants territory on their next drive but a questionable pass interference penalty spiked it. A holding penalty negated a first down in Redskins territory on the Giants’ next drive and they punted it away.

The Redskins got the ball at their own 27 with 3:51 left. They certainly did not want to allow Eli Manning, who had beaten them with an improbable bomb in the last minutes of their game in October, to get his hands on the ball with any amount of time left on the clock.

They picked up one first down on Darrel Young’s four-year run on second and two. That forced New York to start burning its timeouts. On second and eight Griffin dropped back and fired a bullet over the middle to Garçon, who caught it for 17 yards.

The final nail in the Giants’ coffin came a few plays later when Morris pounded up the middle for six yards on third and three. One play from victory formation later, the Redskins were winners.

“We made the plays when it counted,” said Griffin. “I couldn’t be any more proud of the guys.”

Although Griffin said that “stats don’t mean anything” his numbers were pretty good. He completed 13 of 21 passes for 163 yards and the touchdown for a passer rating of 101.9. Griffin did not throw an interception and he was not sacked. On the ground, he gained 72 yards on five carries, including a 46-yard dash in the third quarter.

The Redskins now trail the division leading Giants by one game with four to play. New York now has three division losses while the Washington has only one. That means that the Redskins potentially has the tiebreaker advantage should they catch New York for the division lead.

“There’s a lot of excitement surrounding this team and I think everybody feels it,” said Griffin.

A lot of people are feeling it and RG3 is the man mainly responsible for creating it. 

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With Barry Trotz out, Jay Gruden is now your longest-tenured major head coach in D.C.

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USA TODAY Sports

With Barry Trotz out, Jay Gruden is now your longest-tenured major head coach in D.C.

Jay Gruden is many things, including honest, witty, one of the greatest Arena League quarterbacks in the history of the universe and, as of June 18, the longest-tenured head coach of a major D.C. sports team.

With the Capitals and Barry Trotz parting ways, Gruden is now officially the area's most experienced boss (while Gruden was actually hired a few months before Trotz back in 2014, they both have led their teams through four seasons up to this point, which is the number that matters here).

Scott Brooks, meanwhile, has overseen the Wizards for two campaigns, while Nats manager Dave Martinez is in the middle of his first year at the helm.

This designation will pair nicely with the fact that Gruden will also be the first 'Skins headman to hold his job into a fifth season in the Dan Snyder era. You don't need to make plans to visit his statue yet, of course, but this is some uncharted territory the 51-year-old is currently hanging out in.

Now, his overall record of 28-35-1 certainly needs work, or else he'll be in danger of handing the longest-tenured distinction over to Brooks. However, Gruden does deserve credit for bringing an amount of stability to the Burgundy and Gold, a franchise that is usually as stable as Metro's Wi-Fi connection.

So, with all due respect to DC United's Ben Olsen, the Kastles' Murphy Jensen and whatever legend is in charge of your kid's dynastic flag football team, when you think of the man who's been roaming the sidelines longer than anyone else in D.C., be sure to think of this man and only this man:

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Barry Trotz's departure reminiscent of Joe Gibbs' resignation in 1993

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Associated Press

Barry Trotz's departure reminiscent of Joe Gibbs' resignation in 1993

The sudden resignation of Barry Trotz as the coach of the Stanley Cup champion Capitals is the most stunning Washington coaching departure since Joe Gibbs retired from the Redskins about 13 months after the team won its third Super Bowl in a 10-year span. 

In the years leading up to Gibbs’ departure, there were some rumblings that he might leave. As early as 1986, John Madden said that Gibbs was a candidate to burn out of the profession early. During the 1989 season, Gibbs said that he was contemplating retirement, but he retracted his words the next day. In 1990, columnist and TV pregame panelist Will McDonough reported that Gibbs would retire after the season. Retirement rumors popped up again in early 1992, just two days before Super Bowl XXVI. Again, Gibbs denied them. The Redskins easily beat the Bills to claim their third championship in 10 years and there was no apparent reason why such a successful coach would think about leaving. 

Redskins fans had become so used to hearing the Gibbs retirement reports that many just started to tune them out. So on the morning of March 5, 1993, when reports of Gibbs’ resignation as coach started to circulate, many were in a state of denial.

That turned out to be wishful thinking. The fans were given a hard jolt of reality when the team announced a noon press conference. 

There the coach was on TV, as promised, confirming the news. He said it was a family decision. 

“Every year, we get away and talk about it,” Gibbs said. “We always reach the same conclusion. This year, it was different. The boys didn’t encourage me one way or another, but they understood when I told them what I was thinking. I think Pat’s happier than anyone. This isn’t an easy lifestyle for a coach’s wife. The coach is the guy who stands up and hears everyone tell him how great he is. The wife is the one waiting at home alone while the coach is spending every night at the office. 

“I wanted more time with my family. I wanted more time with my sons. I look at this as a window of opportunity with them and I couldn’t let it pass.” 

Although he has been diagnosed with a condition that has caused some pain and some difficulty in sleeping, Gibbs said that health was not a factor in his decision. 

Richie Petitbon, the team’s longtime defensive coordinator, was named the team’s new head coach. It had to be one of the shortest job interviews ever. 

“I get a call from Mr. Cooke who tells me Joe has retired and that he wants me to coach the Redskins,” Petitbon said. “After I picked myself up off the floor, I said yes.” 

After hearing the news, most Redskins fans had to pick themselves up as well.  

Petitbon lasted only one season as the head coach and the other eight head coaches who followed, including Gibbs himself in a four-year second stint, have been unable to get the Redskins back to the Super Bowl. Coincidentally, the Caps’ head coaching job is widely expected to go to Todd Reirden, who was Trotz’s top assistant just as Pettitbon was Gibbs’. 

Washington fans hope that the Caps have better fortune with Trotz’s successors. 

More Redskins

- 53-man roster: Roster projection--Offense
- 53-man roster: Best players 25 or younger

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page, Facebook.com/TandlerNBCSand follow him on Twitter  @TandlerNBCSand on Instagram @RichTandler