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RT's 5: A muddled picture at cornerback

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RT's 5: A muddled picture at cornerback

Rich Tandlers five things possibly related to the Washington Redskins and other matters.5. The decision to make Robert Griffin III the starter at quarterback without a competition taking place was sound if only for one reasonpractice reps are limited and Griffin needs all them he can get with the first team. Was there some PR value in the move? Possibly there was some desire to nip any talk of a competition with fourth-round draft pick Kirk Cousins. But naming RG3 the starter just makes sense when it comes to the on-field aspects of it and any public relations value is peripheral.4. It would not be surprising at all to see Josh LeRibeus get a lot of work at center during the offseason and in training camp. A look at the Redskins depth chart there shows starter Will Montgomery, 2010 draft pick Erik Cook, and rookie free agent Grant Garner. Cook did not play well when he was pressed into action at center last year and at 6-6 he may be too tall to succeed there in any case. Garner is likely a practice squad guy at best for the time being. They need depth in the middle and LeRibeus, who practiced as the backup center at SMU and played there during the rookie camp, could be the guy to bring it.3. It will be interesting to see how things play out at cornerback. There are eight on the roster and none of them appears to be training camp fodder. DeAngelo Hall and Josh Wilson are the starters but everything is muddled behind that. Holdovers Kevin Barnes and Brandyn Thompson will compete with free agent signees Cedric Griffin and Leigh Torrence, seventh-round draft pick Richard Crawford and undrafted free agent Chase Minnifield. It would not shock me if any of them ended up playing a key role and it would not be surprising if any of them was cut.2. The situation is not so complicated at outside linebacker. There are six of them currently on the roster and five are likely to stick around for the season. Brian Orakpo and Ryan Kerrigan will be backed up by Rob Jackson, Markus White and Chris Wilson. Rookie free agent Monte Lewis will be the odd man out.1. OK, thats enough of the peripheral, on-field stuff and on to whats really important. I like the throwback uniforms a lot because, well, they actually are throwbacks. Sure, some modern touches were added to the uniform worn by Sammy Baugh but not so much that they lost their essential character. The best part is the simulated leather helmet, although I have to say that it comes off much better when actually looking at it rather than looking at pictures. Its hard to capture the look in two dimensions.Days until: OTAs start 7; Minicamp 29; Preseason opener 87; Redskins @ Saints 118Rich Tandler blogs about the Redskins at www.RealRedskins.com. You can reach him by email at RTandlerCSN@comcast.net and follow him on Twitter @Rich_Tandler.

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Need to Know: A look at the Redskins' key 2019 free agents

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USA Today Sports Images

Need to Know: A look at the Redskins' key 2019 free agents

Here is what you need to know on this Sunday, May 27, 16 days before the Washington Redskins start minicamp.  

Note: I am vacationing in the Outer Banks this week. In this space, I’ll be presenting some of the most popular posts of the last few months. I hope you enjoy these “best of” presentations and I’ll see you folks when I get back. 

Here is my sunrise view from this morning:

Looking at next year’s free agents

This post was originally published on March 18. 

There is still work that the Redskins can do in free agency and they still have some of their own players they want to retain. But with a lot of the player movement already in the books, we can take a look forward some of the key Redskin who currently are set to be free agents when the 2019 league year opens. 

QB Colt McCoy (Week 1 age 32)—Lots of questions here. Will the Redskins want to keep him around for another year as Alex Smith’s backup? Or will they want a younger and cheaper backup? Will McCoy want to move on rather than back up another QB who doesn’t miss many games?

OL Ty Nsekhe (32)—The Redskins gave him a second-round restricted free agent tender this year so it’s possible that he could be gone or on a long-term contract in Washington. If he is a free agent, his value and the difficulty of retaining him could depend on if he ends the season as a reserve tackle (easy) or as a starting guard (hard). 

OLB Preston Smith (25)—As we saw with Trent Murphy (three years, $21 million with up to $30 million), pass rushers get paid. Smith also makes big plays. Since Smith came into the NFL, he is the only player with at least 20 sacks, 3 interceptions, and 4 forced fumbles. If the Redskins can’t reach a deal on an extension with him this year the franchise tag is a distinct possibility. 

WR Jamison Crowder (25)—This year the supply of quality receivers both as free agents and in the draft sent contract prices skyrocketing. To guard against that happening next year, the Redskin should start talking to Crowder about an extension soon. 

ILB Zach Vigil (27)—As I noted here, Vigil went from being cut in September to a very valuable reserve in November. Both Zach Brown and Mason Foster will still be under contract, but the Redskin still should make an effort to retain Vigil for special teams and as a capable backup. 

Other Redskins who are slated to be UFA’s next year are DL Ziggy Hood and ILB Martrell Spaight. 

It’s also worth noting that WR Maurice Harris and DE Anthony Lanier will both be restricted free agents next year. Both positions were pricey in free agency this year, so both could require at least second-round tenders, which likely will increase to about $3 million in 2019. 

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page, Facebook.com/TandlerNBCSand follow him on Twitter  @TandlerNBCSand on Instagram @RichTandler

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Need to Know: A closer look at Alex Smith's contract with the Redskins

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Associated Press

Need to Know: A closer look at Alex Smith's contract with the Redskins

Here is what you need to know on this Saturday, May 26, 17 days before the Washington Redskins start minicamp.  

Note: I am vacationing in the Outer Banks this week. In this space, I’ll be presenting some of the most popular posts of the last few months. I hope you enjoy these “best of” presentations and I’ll see you folks when I get back. 

Contract makes Alex Smith a Redskins for at least three seasons

This post was originally published on March 19. 

When the Redskins traded for Alex Smith on January 30, news also broke that he had agreed to a four-year extension with Washington in addition to the one year left on his contract with the Chiefs. While we got some top-line numbers on the deal, we have gone since then without any details. 

Until now. 

The details show a deal that has a slightly higher cap hit in 2018 than was on his original Chiefs contract and the numbers rise gradually over the life of the deal, which runs through 2022. 

Smith got a $27 million signing bonus and his salaries for 2018 ($13 million) and 2019 ($15 million) also are fully guaranteed at signing making the total $55 million (information via Over the Cap, which got data from a report by Albert Breer). 

But there I another $16 million that is guaranteed for all practical purposes. On the fifth day of the 2019 league year, his 2020 salary of $16 million becomes fully guaranteed. He almost assuredly will get to the point where that money will become guaranteed since the Redskins are not going to cut him after one year having invested $55 million in him. So the total guarantees come to $71 million. 

His 2021 salary is $19 million and it goes up to $21 million in 2022. There have been reports of some incentives available to Smith but since we have no details we’ll set those aside for now. 

The cap hits on the contract are as follows: 

2018: $18.4 million
2019: $20.0 million
2020: $21.4 million
2021: $24.4 million
2022: $26.4 million

The Redskins can realistically move on from Smith after 2020. There would be net cap savings of $13 million in 2021 and $21 million in 2022. 

The first impression of the deal is that the Redskins did not move on from Kirk Cousins because they didn’t want to guarantee a lot of money to a quarterback. The total practical guarantee of $71 million is second only to Cousins’ $82.5 million. It should be noted that Cousins’ deal runs for three years and Smith’s contract is for five. 

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page, Facebook.com/TandlerNBCSand follow him on Twitter  @TandlerNBCSand on Instagram @RichTandler