Wizards

Quick Links

Carmelo Anthony on Knicks, Phil Jackson: 'I trust the process'

Carmelo Anthony on Knicks, Phil Jackson: 'I trust the process'

NEW YORK (AP) -- Carmelo Anthony had a half-season of clues about what Phil Jackson thought of him, and now it was his turn to evaluate his boss.

Anthony had trumpeted his trust in Jackson when he re-signed in 2014 and reaffirmed it months later, even as Jackson continued trading away key players from the best team Anthony ever played on in New York.

Reminded of that recently and asked if he still trusted Jackson, Anthony stopped well short.

"I trust the process," he said, mimicking Joel Embiid of the Philadelphia 76ers.

The process isn't going well for Jackson in New York.

The Knicks are 23-34, 12th in the Eastern Conference and on pace to miss the playoffs for the third time in Jackson's three full seasons as president of basketball operations. He's made his relationship with Anthony worse and hasn't made the Knicks better, and a guy who could do little wrong as a coach just can't get it right as an executive.

Maybe Jackson can swing a trade to fix things before Thursday's deadline.

Or maybe he'll just never fix the Knicks.

[RELATED: Report: Wizards interested in T'Wolves' forward]

If Jackson is planning anything, it remains a mystery. He hasn't spoken to reporters covering the Knicks since his preseason press conference in September -- backtracking from his vow to be accessible when he took the job -- and isn't expected to before the deadline. He has made only three postings on Twitter all season.

Yet he's still made plenty of noise.

He angered LeBron James by referring to his friends and business partners as a "posse" in an ESPN story . And he upset some of the league's other power players with his actions toward Anthony -- which could prove damaging when trying to lure free agents. Jackson has either appeared to endorse or refused to distance himself from articles criticizing his best player and has largely cut off communication between them -- after saying when he was hired that he planned to focus on "how players are treated" and "the kind of culture that's built."

Hall of Fame finalist Tracy McGrady told reporters this weekend he couldn't remain quiet the way Anthony has.

"I'm not going to let you disrespect (me) in the public's eye like that," McGrady said. "You're not going to be sending subliminal messages about me like that and I don't respond to that. I don't operate like that. I'm just not going to do it. And then you hide and don't do any media? You leave everything for me to talk about? Nah, that's not cool."

Jackson retains the support of Madison Square Garden chairman James Dolan, who said in a recent ESPN Radio interview that he would not fire Jackson during the two-plus years that remain on his contract. (Both sides have an option to terminate the deal after this season).

Dolan didn't even express much disappointment in the results, even though the Knicks had their worst season ever in Jackson's first season and are 72-149 since the start of 2014-15.

"He was the best guy we thought we could find to run the New York Knicks," Dolan said.

Maybe if he'd been hiring Jackson to coach, as Jackson's 11 championships are a record for coaches. But there were questions about how he would do as an executive with no experience, and the answers haven't been good.

[RELATED: Porter isn't, and never has been, available for a trade]

He fired Mike Woodson and replaced him with first-time coach Derek Fisher, who lasted just 1 years. Starters Tyson Chandler and Raymond Felton were traded in one deal, and J.R. Smith and Iman Shumpert left in another early the next season. They were all mainstays on the Knicks team that won 54 games and reached the second round of the playoffs not even two years before Jackson was hired in March 2014.

Now all that's left is Anthony, and it certainly seems Jackson wants him gone, too. He would have to find a workable deal, hard enough given the 32-year-old Anthony's salary and age, then get him to waive the no-trade clause he gave Anthony when he re-signed him.

If not, maybe Jackson himself would leave this summer -- though Dolan said he had no indication that was the 71-year-old Jackson's plan. But he insists he can't coach for health reasons and doesn't appear to enjoy scouting and dealing with agents, essential parts of his job.

He must be disheartened that the work he put into this team hasn't paid off. Jackson hired Jeff Hornacek to open up the offense after two years of his favored triangle, traded for Derrick Rose and signed free agents Joakim Noah, Courtney Lee and Brandon Jennings. None has sparked a turnaround, and drafting Kristaps Porzingis remains Jackson's only inarguable success.

Jackson played on the last championship Knicks team in 1973 and said when he was hired what it would mean to build another winner here.

"It would be a capstone on the remarkable career that I've had," Jackson said.

There's still time for that.

But these days, Anthony probably isn't the only one who no longer trusts in Jackson.

[RELATED: Lou Williams no longer a trade option for Wizards]

Quick Links

2019 NBA Draft prospect profile: Nickeil Walker-Alexander

nickeil-alexander-walker-layup-vtech-usat.jpg
USA Today Sports Images

2019 NBA Draft prospect profile: Nickeil Walker-Alexander

The Washington Wizards will have the ninth overall pick in the 2019 NBA Draft. Here is the latest in our series on draft prospects who could fall around where the Wizards will select...

2019 NBA Draft Wizards Prospect Preview: Nickeil Alexander-Walker

School: Virginia Tech
Position: Guard
Age: 20 (turns 21 in September)
Height: 6-6
Weight: 204
Wingspan: 6-10
Max vertical: N/A

2018/19 stats: 16.2 ppg, 4.1 rpg, 4.0 apg, 1.9 spg, 0.5 bpg, 47.4 FG% (5.6/11.8), 37.4 3PT% (1.7/4.6), 77.8 FT%

Player comparison: Shai-Gilgeous Alexander, Tomas Satoransky

Projections: NBC Sports Washington 19th, NBADraft.net 14th, Bleacher Report 18th, Sports Illustrated 20th, Ringer 16th

5 things to know:

*Alexander-Walker is a big guard known for his offensive skillset. He can handle the ball, pass and score in a variety of ways. He can play both point guard and shooting guard and affect games with his passing at either spot. 

*He was an excellent three-point shooter in college. As a freshman, he shot 39.2 percent from long range on 4.5 attempts per game. His percentage dipped as a sophomore to 37.4 percent, but that was still impressive given he attempted 4.6 shots per game. 

*Alexander-Walker has a plus wingspan, which he uses to his advantage on defense. He averaged 1.9 steals per game this past season in Blacksburg and his highlight reels are flooded with open court dunks off turnovers. He appears to have strong instincts as a perimeter defender, but could struggle initially at the NBA level against quicker and stronger guards.

*Though he has great size and length for a guard, Alexander-Walker is not considered a premier athlete for the position. He does not have elite quickness or the ability to play consistently above the rim. Because of that, some wonder how high his ceiling will be in the NBA. He may, however, have a high floor given his well-rounded game and basketball IQ.

*Alexander-Walker is from Canada. He has played for the national team as a junior and is part of a new wave of players from the country in the NBA. Alexander-Walker was a high school teammate of Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, who just enjoyed a strong rookie season with the L.A. Clippers.

Fit with Wizards: The Wizards need help at just about every position, so even a guard can't be ruled out. Alexander-Walker would give them more backcourt depth and that is needed long-term, even after John Wall returns from injury.

If Alexander-Walker can develop into an above average perimeter defender, he could be very useful for the Wizards. They need to improve at stopping dribble penetration and three-point shooters. They could use more players with Alexander-Walker's length and ability to force turnovers. Also, he would help spread the floor with his shooting.

All that said, the Wizards could probably find a player with more upside than Alexander-Walker with the ninth overall pick. He would be more in line with their decision to take Troy Brown Jr. last June.

Like Brown, he is smart and a safe bet to carve out a long NBA career. But could Alexander-Walker become an elite player at his position? He seems like a better option if they trade down into the teens and acquire more picks.

Best highlight video:

MORE WIZARDS NEWS:

Quick Links

Are the Wizards waiting too long to choose a new team president?

Are the Wizards waiting too long to choose a new team president?

The Washington Wizards have operated throughout their search for a new team president with patience and for a while it appeared that approach had paid off, as they got close to filling the position over the weekend before Tim Connelly returned to Denver. That patience, though, could be put to the test very soon.

The NBA Combine is already in the books. So, unless they decide to promote interim president Tommy Sheppard, the person who will ultimately be making the call with the ninth overall pick on draft night will have been absent from the face-to-face interviews they conducted in Chicago, IL. It is not ideal, but by waiting this long clearly the Wizards have made peace with that.

They still have some time between now and the Wizards' pre-draft workouts which are not scheduled to begin until the first week of June. The draft is still about a month away and the deadline to extend qualifying offers to their restricted free agents is June 30. 

Whomever leads this team will need to decide on guys like Tomas Satoransky, Thomas Bryant and Bobby Portis. But still, there is time. 

What could throw the biggest wrench into the Wizards' timeline is the impending announcement of All-NBA teams. If Bradley Beal makes All-NBA, which the ballots that have been made public already suggest he has a very good chance to do so, he will be eligible for a supermax contract. 

That would present the Wizards with a complicated situation, one that wouldn't need to be settled overnight but would instantly become the most important story surrounding the team. 

A supermax for Beal is projected to be worth $194 million over four years and would start in the 2021-22 season. With John Wall already signed to a supermax contract, it would be difficult to afford both and still fill out the rest of a competitive roster. Two players would make 70-plus percent of the cap.

If the Wizards determine they can't pay both Beal and Wall long-term, something will have to give. It could lead to a trade.

Deciding on Beal's future, one could argue, may end up being one of the most important calls the Wizards' next team president will have to make in their entire career in Washington. And they would be faced with it as soon as they take the job.

Depending on the timing, the question could even define their introductory press conference. The new president and owner Ted Leonsis would certainly be asked about it.

That is all not to mention how the job could be viewed if Beal makes All-NBA before the position is filled. Anyone who takes the Wizards job will already be doing so with an understanding that it may take time to build a contender given Wall's contract and the fact he is coming off Achilles surgery.

On top of all that, there would be questions about whether the Wizards would offer Beal the contract and, if they offered it, whether he would take it. Beal already raised some doubt about whether he would accept the money, given he has already made plenty in his career and wants to win. 

That standoff could lead to a barrage of trade rumors, which can overshadow just about anything in today's NBA. Just ask the New Orleans Pelicans.

The Beal decision technically would not have to be made for months. If he makes All-NBA, he won't be able to sign the supermax until July 6, when the free agency moratorium ends. They can sign Beal to an extension all the way up until the day before the 2019-20 regular season begins.

But it could become a pressing issue very soon and before the Wizards' next team architect even takes the job.

MORE WIZARDS NEWS: