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Markieff Morris plans to ask Al Horford face-to-face if play that injured him was intentional

Markieff Morris plans to ask Al Horford face-to-face if play that injured him was intentional

BOSTON -- Whether or not Markieff Morris can play Tuesday -- he thinks he can -- he plans on looking Al Horford in the eyes to ask if the play that caused him to injure his left ankle and leave Game 1 was intentional.

"I'm not sure," Morris said of the second-quarter incident Sunday vs. the Boston Celtics. "I'm going to ask him, though. I looked at it a couple times. It's not really that pretty, so I couldn't really watch it too much."

Morris went down in a heap midway through the second quarter of a 123-111 loss for the Wizards in Game 1. The Wizards never looked like themselves after they started the game 16-0.

Morris was booed for staying on the floor for so long to hold up the game. He'd made the jump shot over Horford, got up to hit the foul shot for the infraction and left for good with the Wizards ahead 45-42. 

"He said 'my fault,'" Morris said when asked about the verbal exchange he had with his opponent. "That was his words."

Morris watched his teammates practice at TD Garden wearing slippers with his heavily wrapped left ankle that had a stim device attached. 

[RELATED: Dirty or dangerous? Horford injured Beal two years ago, too]

Morris missed time after first injuring his left ankle in a game vs. the Miami Heat in November.

"He's had treatments all day yesterday and last night. Same thing this morning," coach Scott brooks said. "Will just see how he feels game to game. I don't want to make any call on anything right now. 

"It's a sprain. Our medical team and we'll all get together and do what's best for him. Right now he's out until we see how he feels tomorrow."

Morris' ankle problems go back further than this. In his sixth NBA season, he recalled issues he had even before he was drafted 13th overall in 2011 by the Phoenix Suns. 

"Everybody has their injury. That was my injury. Twisted my ankle a lot," said Morris, who was at Kansas for three seasons. "Been working on them a lot. (Sunday) was one of thsoe things it really didn't matter the strength of your ankles at all. He was just up under me. That was the cause of it.

"I'm feeling better. The swelling went down a whole lot. I'm just going to keep treating it and get ready for Game 2." 

He acknowledges that despite his willingness to play now given that he gauged his ankle pain as a 5 on a scale from 1-10, it'll be the team doctors' decision along with Brooks. He hopes, however, that they take what he thinks into consideration, too.

"I got to pass the protocol for the team. That's final," Morris said. "It's nothing doctors can say to me to not be able to play. Got an X-Ray and I can see clearly it wasn't broken so give me leeway for my decision."

[RELATED: Celtics look to dominate Wizards, not come back]

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Wizards 2018 NBA Draft prospect profile: Jerome Robinson

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USA TODAY Sports

Wizards 2018 NBA Draft prospect profile: Jerome Robinson

The Washington Wizards hold the 15th and 44th overall picks in the 2018 NBA Draft. Here is the latest in our series on draft prospects projected to be picked around where the Wizards will select...

2018 NBA Draft Wizards Prospect Preview: Jerome Robinson

School: Boston College
Position: Shooting guard
Age: 21
Height: 6-5
Weight: 188
Wingspan: 6-7
Max vertical: N/A

2017/18 stats: 20.7 ppg, 3.6 rpg, 3.3 apg, 0.9 spg, 0.1 bpg, 48.5 FG%, 40.9 3PT% (2.3 3PT/5.7 3PA), 83.0 FT%
Player comparison: Danny Green
Projections: NBC Sports Washington 29th, NBADraft.net 16th, Bleacher Report 19th, Sports Illustrated 17th

5 things to know:

*A three-year player at BC, Robinson developed into a big-time scorer before making the leap to the NBA. He averaged 18.7 points as a sophomore and then 20.7 points as a junior while improving his shooting percentages across the board. He went from 42.3 percent from the field as a sophomore to 48.5 in 2017-18.

*Robinson turned himself into an excellent three-point shooter. After shooting just 33.3 percent as a sophomore, he got that up to 40.9 percent as a junior and on 5.7 attempts per game. That trajectory bodes well for Robinson's chances at the next level.

*He has a quick release on his jumper, giving him the ability to be effective on catch-and-shoot plays off screens. Robinson could develop into a reliable scorer who doesn't need the ball in his hands as a primary focus of the offense. He also showed the ability to throw down some powerful dunks and finish with creativity at the rim. He didn't record a vertical leap at the NBA Combine, but playing above and around the rim didn't appear to be a problem in college.

*Though it didn't show in his last season at Boston College, Robinson was adept at forcing turnovers in his first two years. He averaged 1.6 steals per game across his freshman and sophomore seasons and 16 times in his career had three steals or more in a game.

*Questions for Robinson would include his versatility and speed. Some draft evaluators wonder if he will be able to get separation off the dribble at the NBA level. Also, he put up decent rebounding and assists numbers in college but didn't exactly stand out in either category.

Fit with Wizards: Robinson would give the Wizards depth at the shooting guard position and they need that. He could help Bradley Beal pare down his minutes and offer a scoring punch off the Wizards' bench. The Wizards could use a reliable shooter to help space the floor for Kelly Oubre, Jr. and others in the second unit.

The problems with Robinson's fit would be his lack of positional versatility and what appears to be a relatively low ceiling. He's not the freak athlete that some of his counterparts are at shooting guard. If the Wizards are choosing between Robinson and guys like Zhaire Smith and Lonnie Walker IV, they could view the latter two as more enticing because of their potential. Robinson would represent a safer pick while others could pay off big-time and have a greater impact on the franchise in the long-term.

Best highlight video:

More draft prospect profiles:

Kevin Knox, PF, Kentucky

Miles Bridges, SF, Michigan State

Robert Williams, PF/C, Texas A&M

Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, PG, Kentucky

Zhaire Smith, SG, Texas Tech

Landry Shamet, PG/SG, Wichita State

Gary Trent, Jr., SG, Duke

Lonnie Walker IV, SG, Miami

Anfernee Simons, PG/SG, IMG Academy

Khyri Thomas, SG, Creighton

Chandler Hutchison, SG/SF, Boise State

Kevin Huerter, SG, Maryland

Mitchell Robinson, C, Western Kentucky

Troy Brown, SG/SF, Oregon

Donte DiVincenzo, SG, Villanova

Moritz Wagner, PF/C, Michigan

Aaron Holiday, PG, UCLA

Keita Bates-Diop, SF, Ohio State

For more on the NBA Draft, check out our latest episode of the Wizards Tipoff podcast:

NBC Sports Washington is on Apple News. Favorite us!

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Wizards Tipoff podcast: Draft prospect profiles on Moe Wagner, Michael Porter, Jr., Grayson Allen and more

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USA TODAY Sports

Wizards Tipoff podcast: Draft prospect profiles on Moe Wagner, Michael Porter, Jr., Grayson Allen and more

On the latest episode of the Wizards Tipoff podcast presented by Greenberg and Bederman, Chase Hughes was joined by Nick Ashooh and Stefon Marquis to talk NBA Draft. 

They broke down five prospects and their potential fit with the Wizards: Moe Wagner of Michigan, Michael Porter, Jr. of Missouri, Grayson Allen of Duke, Collin Sexton of Alabama and Omari Spellman of Villanova.

You can listen to the episode right here:

You can download the podcast on Apple Podcasts right here and on Google Play. If you like the show please tell your friends!

MORE WIZARDS COVERAGE: