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State of the Wizards: Brooks on how Beal can be like Klay Thompson

State of the Wizards: Brooks on how Beal can be like Klay Thompson

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Brooks reacts to Klay Thompson's 60-point night - Wizards head coach Scott Brooks was asked before Tuesday's game against the Orlando Magic what he thought about Klay Thompson going off for an insane 60 points in just 29 minutes the night before. Once he realized where the question was going, Brooks grinned and leaned back in his chair. He then quipped: "It took me about 20 games to 60."

After the room laughed at his joke, and after the reporter point out a SportVU stat that said Thompson only touched the basketball for a total of 90 seconds during the game, Brooks told a story that Thompson's performance reminded him of. It reminded him of a film session he had with Bradley Beal on the road just a week before Thompson's big night:

"It doesn't get any better than that. It's funny, Bradley and I were watching film together just him and I last week and I told him that, I said 'you're one of the few guys in this league that can score 30 and have the ball in your hands less than a minute.' He didn't believe me. So, we looked at a couple of his clips and I [using] slow-motion and slow frames, I said 'look, there's 19 seconds on the shot clock and you've got the ball in your hands.' So, I did the clip. 'You shot the ball, it's out of your hands. Now look at the shot clock.' There was still 19 seconds. So, you shot the ball in what, .5 seconds? He's one of the few guys that can do that. Klay is obviously the same type of player. These guys that come off pindowns, they don't need the ball in their hands. They don't need to dribble the ball around the court five or six times to get a look. They've got the speed, they've got great footwork to come off [screens] and they've got the stroke. When you have bigs that set great screens like they do and we do, guys like Beal get a lot of opportunities to get points without touching the ball a whole lot in his hands."

Thompson looks like a future Hall of Famer at this point, one of the best shooters of all time who is a complete player with above-average skills on the defensive end. Putting Beal in the same category is a lofty comparison at this point.

But Beal is one of the best young guards in the NBA and there's no reason to put a ceiling on him at this stage of his career. Beal, a five-year NBA veteran, is in the middle of his Age 23 season. He's averaging 21.4 points per game on 44.1 percent shooting. Thompson was a three-year pro at Age 23 and scoring 18.4 points on 44.4 percent shooting. Beal is shooting 41.5 percent from three on 6.9 attempts per game. Thompson at the same age was hitting 41.7 percent of his threes on 6.6 shots per game.

Thompson is on a different level than Beal at this point, but he's also three years older. Beal may never get to where Klay is now, but Brooks does make an interesting point in terms of their similarities.

Satoransky's getting less minutes - Brooks' bench continues to evolve and lately that has meant less run for rookie Tomas Satoransky. The 6-foot-7 guard has not played at all in two of the Wizards' last three games, and the outlier was a 3:33 stint against the Nets on Monday.

Trey Burke has been the beneficiary of Satoransky's diminished role, logging 10 minutes against the Spurs and 12 vs. the Nets. Brooks was asked about Satoransky getting less minutes and he had this to say:

"He's putting so much pressure on himself and that's kind of norma. We've all been there as players in this league. There are a lot of things that you have to internalize and execute and the coach wants something, the four guys want something on the court. It's tough. I'm going to be very patient with him. I really believe that he's still a big part of what we do right now. He's just going to have to fit in where he fits in with the minutes. They're not going to be real consistent right now, but you never know. He just has to be ready. I thought Trey the last couple of games gave us a good lift. He has experience and he can manage... at this point he's a better scorer in the pick-and-roll setting. But Tomas is going to continue to work hard, he's a great kid that works hard.

Eastern Conference standings

Game of the week: John Wall 12/7 vs. Magic - 52 points, 8 assists, 4 rebounds, 3 steals, 18-for-31 FG, 5-for-8 3PT, 11-for-14 FT

Quote of the Week

"Our job is to wake up and just play hard. Before you made it to the NBA or got a college scholarship, you played hard every day to get to where you wanted to. To still be talking about playing hard, that's something that you should be able to do after just waking up. Everybody has a job and they have to go work hard. Our job is to come here and play hard and compete. That's the easiest thing that you should do without any contracts or any money, just come in and play basketball … if I had the answer we wouldn't be in this situation."

- John Wall on the Wizards' defensive effort against Orlando on Tuesday night

Tweet (or Instagram) of the Week

Road ahead

Mon. - 118-113 win at Brooklyn Nets
Tue. - 124-116 loss vs. Orlando Magic
Wed. - OFF
Thu. - 7 p.m. vs. Denver Nuggets (CSN)
Fri. - OFF
Sat. - 7 p.m. vs. Milwaukee Bucks (CSN)
Sun. - OFF

[RELATED: Wall faces music alone, questions Wizards' effort]

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Justin Bieber's new No. 1 album features production from ex-Wizard JaVale McGee

Justin Bieber's new No. 1 album features production from ex-Wizard JaVale McGee

Former Wizard Javale McGee has a well-known reputation in the NBA for his emphatic dunks, and his name is cemented in NBA history with two championships. Now McGee can add a No. 1 album to his list of accomplishments.

McGee, who currently is helping the Los Angeles Lakers maintain the best record in the Western Conference, was listed as a contributor on the song "Available" on Justin Bieber's new hit album “Changes.” 

McGee took advantage of constantly being on the road during his career and began networking with major players in the music industry, before meeting Jason "Poo Bear" Boyd, one of Bieber's producers in 2013.

"I was in the studio with Poo Bear around November of last year," McGee told the New York Times in an article published Friday. "I didn’t know who I was making music for. I was playing some songs and samples and he stopped on this one sample that I had made. He looped it, put it in the computer and we just started writing to it. We ended up writing the whole song, but there were no drums or anything." 

McGee said a few months later when he was speaking with Boyd, he was notified that he was on the album. 

"It was amazing," McGee said. "Justin Bieber is one of the, if not the, top artists out there. So to be able to keep working and produce something for an artist like that is amazing."

Another slam-dunk.

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Report: Los Angeles deputies shared Kobe Bryant crash photos

Report: Los Angeles deputies shared Kobe Bryant crash photos

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Authorities are investigating whether deputies shared graphic photos of the helicopter crash scene where Kobe Bryant, his 13-year-old daughter and seven others were killed, according to a newspaper report.

The Los Angeles Times reported that a public safety source with knowledge of the events had seen one of the photos on the phone of another official in a setting that was not related to the investigation of the crash. He said the photos showed the scene and victims' remains.

The source spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the allegations.

Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Maria Lucero told The Associated Press on Friday that "the matter is being looked into."

The Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, the union that represents rank-and-file deputies, did not immediately return requests for comment.

The Times reported that it's unclear how widely the photos might have been disseminated and who was involved. It's additionally unclear whether the deputies had taken the photos themselves or received them from someone else.

Capt. Jorge Valdez, a spokesman for the sheriff's department, said the department had contacted the victims' families because of the newspaper's inquiries.

Bryant and the others were killed in the Jan. 26 helicopter crash northwest of Los Angeles were traveling to a youth basketball tournament at Bryant's sports facility in Thousand Oaks. The cause of the crash is undetermined.

Bryant and his daughter Gianna, whose team was coached by her father, were honored at a public memorial Monday at Staples Center, where Bryant starred for most of his 20-year career with the Los Angeles Lakers.

A report by the National Transportation Safety Board stated there weren't any signs of engine failure from the wreckage recovered from the crash site. The pilot, Ara Zobayan, had nearly navigated the helicopter out of blinding clouds when it turned and plunged into the mountainside.

Bryant's widow, Vanessa, filed a wrongful death lawsuit Monday, alleging that Zobayan was careless and negligent by flying in cloudy conditions and should have aborted the flight. The lawsuit names Island Express Helicopters Inc., operator of the service, and Island Express Holding Corp., owner of the craft. It also targets pilot Ara Zobayan's representative or successor, listed only as "Doe 1" until a name can be determined.

Also killed in the crash were Orange Coast College baseball coach John Altobelli, his wife, Keri, and their daughter Alyssa; Christina Mauser, who helped Bryant coach the girls' basketball team; and Sarah Chester and her daughter Payton. Keri and Payton were Gianna's teammates.