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Takeaways from Wizards' win over Pacers behind Morris' season-high

Takeaways from Wizards' win over Pacers behind Morris' season-high

A new home winning streak is underway, after the Wizards had to hold off repeated attempts by the Indiana Pacers to win 112-107 on Friday night at Verizon Center in front of 19,503 fans.

John Wall produced his 33rd double-double (26 points, 14 assists) and Bradley Beal (20 points, four assists) struggled to get free of Paul George to generate offense. But Markieff Morris (season-high 26 points, 10 rebounds, three assists)  exploited his advantage against Lavoy Allen to great success and Marcin Gortat (14 points, 16 rebounds) had his 31st double-double.

Paul George (31 points) led all scorers and was at times unstoppable for Indiana (29-24) which had won seven of eight games coming into Friday. Jeff Teague (13 points, nine assists) and Kevin Seraphin (16 points) contributed with three other players for Indiana in double figures at 10 points (Allen, Myles Turner, Rodney Stuckey).

The Wizards lost 140-135 in overtime on Monday to the Cleveland Cavaliers – they also had ended the Pacers’ seven-game win streak – to snap their 17 consecutive home wins at Verizon.

The Wizards (32-21) are now ahead 2-1 in the season series with Indiana with one more game remaining between them before the All-Star break on Feb. 16.

Indiana cut the deficit to 105-102 in the final minute but it was Wall driving past George, drawing the help, and finding Morris for a three-pointer for a six-point edge with 50.6 seconds left to seal it.

--Teague has hurt the Wizards by getting inside the defense and breaking them down in the paint. He had success doing that early with 11 points and five assists in the first half. He went to the free-throw line four times – more than Wall and Beal combined. He was held in check the rest of the way mostly because the Wizards opted to put size on him during key stretches with the length of Kelly Oubre and Tomas Satoransky. Teague scored just two points in the second half 

-- Pacers coach Nate McMillan went with a big lineup with his second unit, playing Seraphin, a former Wizard, and center while Al Jefferson (six points) was at power forward. That’s when they made their move and pounded the Wizards’ second unit by isolating and using their size to their advantage and getting to their preferred spots to make shots. The Wizards failed to play with pace and move the ball frequently enough to force the plodding bigs to rotate and recover. They erased a seven-point deficit in the first quarter to take a 39-38 lead on Stuckey’s jumper. The Wizards re-inserted four starters and Indiana still continued its run to push the lead to 47-38.

--George defending Beal was a foregone conclusion. In the Pacers’ victory in their first meeting, Beal started 4-for-6 and appeared headed for a big night. He didn’t score in the second and third quarters and shot 3-for-13 after the first 12 minutes. George’s 6-7 frame, reach and ability to recover from screens and trail to take away three-point looks is a valuable asset for Indiana. Beal was 1-for-4 in the first half for seven points but did have three assists. The Wizards had to make them pay for using their best defender, which meant Porter and Morris knocking down open looks or beating 1-on-1 coverage.

--The help was so heavy towards Beal, the Wizards sometimes ran down the shot clock too far trying to get him the ball. That’s how they lost the lead in the third on Lavoy Allen’s shot to put Indiana head 72-70 at 5:39. After a timeout, the Wizards used Beal as a decoy to get Morris an open three and layups for Gortat when he was being fronted in the post (and no weakside help). They went into the fourth up 86-81 as a result.

-- The coverage by Indiana created lanes for that Gortat to get on the boards for tip-ins and tap outs. He converted a miss on a drive by Morris for a 103-98 lead but had an important contest of Teague at the rim in the final minute that allowed the Wizards to get the ball and get out to a three-possession lead with 37 seconds left.

--Porter was in foul trouble, picking up his fifth with 7:42 left in the game. Satoransky, not Oubre, replaced him. Satoransky’s stat line was modest (four points in 13 minutes) but it was his ball pressure and length that was effective. He contested a pull-up jumper from Monta Ellis (eight points) that was off to the right and forced Stuckey into a traveling violation.

--Ian Mahinmi played for the second game in a row but wasn’t as effective in spot duty in the first half. He had a layup on a nifty interior pass from Wall but mishandled it for a turnover. He did body up Jefferson to force a miss at the rim. He’ll be more of an asset defensively before he can provide much lift in terms of bench points. Plus he has to get used to the quick-hit passes from Wall when he draws the defense. Mahinmi did have a rotation in the fourth quarter that produced a turnover. His impact will be modest and sometimes understated.

--Trey Burke (seven points, five assists) was a spark early but fell into overdribbling which is why the second unit had difficulty keeping leads or closing the gap. He was 3-for-6 until the fourth quarter when he missed all three attempts. 

--The Pacers shot 4-for-21 from three-point range, or 19%, a focus of the Wizards' defense since they allowed the Cavs to get loose on the perimeter. Morris ran out to contest a three by George late in the fourth and forced a miss. George was 2-for-6 from deep and C.J. Miles (three points) 1-for-5. They combined to shoot 15-for-17 from long range in a blowout of the Wizards here last season.

[RELATED: VIDEO: Markieff Morris' dunk goes off top of backboard and in]

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Watch Rui Hachimura’s shutdown block

Watch Rui Hachimura’s shutdown block

Rui Hachimura continued his dominance in international friendlies Saturday as he put up 31 points and five rebounds in a winning effort over Germany.

After a highlight-reel performance in Thursday's loss to Argentina, Hachimura was back at it two days later.

That block at the 37-second mark is just filthy. It would also be goaltending in the NBA, but FIBA rules allow players to touch the ball at pretty much any time once it's made contact with some part of the hoop. Nevertheless, the athleticism to make this play is what stands out.

But Hachimura wasn't finished.

He looks more like Steph Curry leading that breakaway, dribbling behind his back and finishing at the rim himself than a 6-foot-8 forward.

With the international friendly schedule at its end, Japan will tip off the 2020 FIBA World Cup on Sunday, Sept. 1 against Turkey. After a matchup with the Czech Republic, Hachimura and Japan will take on his future NBA opponents when they face the United States on Sept. 5.

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Maryland native Quinn Cook tells the behind-the-scenes story of his road to the Lakers

Maryland native Quinn Cook tells the behind-the-scenes story of his road to the Lakers

Before he joined the Los Angeles Lakers as part of a blockbuster summer that saw them land Anthony Davis, before he won the NBA Finals as a role player with the Golden State Warriors, and before he averaged double-digit scoring and won the NCAA tournament at Duke, Quinn Cook was a star point guard at DeMatha Catholic High School in Hyattsville, Md.

Cook was in town this week for his fourth annual youth basketball camp at First Baptist Church of Glenarden in Landover. NBC Sports Washington’s Chris Miller sat down with the former Stag, who he’s known since the now-Lakers guard was 14 years old, on the Wizards Talk podcast.

Miller talked with Cook about why he feels connected to kids in the local community and what it was like losing his father as a teenager. One of his closest friends is fellow DeMatha product Victor Oladipo, who helped him get through the loss of his father Ted when he died suddenly in 2008 after going into a coma following a colon procedure.

“My best friend Norman and Victor, their parents took them out of school, and they were with me for two weeks,” Cook said. “At the funeral, [head coach Mike] Jones had the entire DeMatha basketball program…come to the funeral and all sit together [with] their uniforms on.”

Cook also went on to talk about his time at Duke, the viral video in which he convinced some people at the mall he was J Cole and his obsession with winning before going into how he landed in Los Angeles this offseason.

“When Golden State withdrew their qualifying offer, I became unrestricted and had some teams call me and the Lakers thing, it just happened quick,” Cook said. “I had talks with them, AD called me, [LeBron James] called Rob Palinka for me, and Coach K called them, talked to Bron and stuff and we got it done.”

Check out the full podcast below and listen to Miller talk hoops every week on the Wizards Talk podcast.

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