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Wait, is that really Counting Crows frontman Adam Duritz at the Wizards-Warriors game?

Wait, is that really Counting Crows frontman Adam Duritz at the Wizards-Warriors game?

On Tuesday night, the Warriors and Wizards were set to tip-off at the Verizon Center.

As fans began to pack the house for the highly anticipated contest, our very own Redskins Insider JP Finlay noticed someone in the lower bowl who looked familiar.

It looked like Adam Duritz, the frontman for popular alternative band Counting Crows.

But that couldn't actually be him, right?

As it turns out, yes, it very much is Adam Duritz.

Duritz is a huge Warriors fan having grown up in the Oakland area. He now lives in New York City, but tries to see the team live as much as possible. He's even become close friends with head coach Steve Kerr, recently attending a Cal vs. Oregon basketball game. 

So to answer the question in the headline: Duritz is at the Wizards vs. Warriors game because he's a huge Warriors fan and probably wants to watch two of the hottest teams in the NBA go at it.

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NBA Power Rankings: The playoff push begins

NBA Power Rankings: The playoff push begins

The All-Star break has come and gone, teams have their rosters pretty much figured out by now and it's time to start jostling for playoff seeding. 

Who has the edge? Who needs to make a push right now? Who's in danger of a late-season slide?

We'll answer those questions now with about a quarter of the 2019-20 season still to be played. 

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Last week: 30

Steph Curry is on the brink of a return from a broken hand he suffered in October. But until he comes back, the Warriors remain the worst team in basketball. 

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Kevin Durant, Al Harrington: It's time for the NBA to treat cannibas more like alcohol

Kevin Durant, Al Harrington: It's time for the NBA to treat cannibas more like alcohol

The recreational use of cannibas is banned on the federal level, but is legal in Washington D.C. (along with 11 other states). Major League Baseball doesn't treat it as a banned substance. The National Hockey League has no automatic punishment for a player who tests positive for it. So why is it still on the banned list in the NBA?

When speaking to NBC Sports' Tom Haberstroh and Monte Poole for a wide-ranging article on cannibas and the NBA that was published on Thursday, many former and current NBA players questioned the policy.

One-time Wizard player Al Harrington, when speaking to Haberstroh and Poole pointed to the superstars like LeBron James posting themselves with a postgame glass of wine and were celebrated for their good taste.

“This is what bothers me about this conversation,” Harrington said. “People think that players come to the game high. If that were the case, and they were that irresponsible, why don’t players play drunk? We all know there’s a time and place for everything. We go out and compete at the highest level in the world.

“If I’m going to play against Kevin Durant tonight, why would I get as high as I can and come to the game and play Kevin Durant high? It’s so stupid to me. It’s like, you’re policing us like we’re kids. We have access to liquor, it’s the same effect. That’s one of the things that really bothers me about the whole perception that players have access to it, they’re going to come to the games high. We have access to liquor but players don’t show up drunk to games.”

When appearing on a recent podcast, All The Smoke, Durant said that it should be treated more like alcohol or coffee than a banned substance. 

“Everybody on my team drinks coffee every day," the Maryland native said. "Taking caffeine every day. Or guys go out to have wine after games or have a little drink here and there. Marijuana should be in that tone,

“Why are we even talking about it? It shouldn’t even be a conversation now. So hopefully we can get past that and the stigma around it and know that it does nothing but make people have a good time, make people hungry, bring people together — that plant brings us all together.”

You can read Haberstroh and Poole's article here.