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Wizards coach Scott Brooks has little sympathy for NBA players who rest just to rest

Wizards coach Scott Brooks has little sympathy for NBA players who rest just to rest

With the playoffs right around the corner and the regular season winding down, the NBA has lately been dominated by the debate around resting superstar players. The Warriors did it recently in a nationally televised game against the Spurs. Then, the Cavs rested Lebron James and then Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love on other occasions.

Former players like Karl Malone and Charles Barkley have weighed in. John Wall even said the league has gotten softer. And since league commissioner Adam Silver has vowed to fix what he sees as a major problem for the sport.

Wizards head coach Scott Brooks comes from Malone and Barkley's era, as a 10-year NBA player who entered the league in 1988. Now he is a coach, so he can relate to both generations.

On Wednesday he shared his thoughts in depth on the issue and, though he understands the practice, has little sympathy for players who want to rest just to rest.

"There's certain cases and certain examples and certain players that probably need it. But that's very rare in my opinion," he said. "You're talking basketball. It's 32 minutes a night. This is not hard work. This is fun. Rest, to me rest is a good night sleep. I've seen coaches and players do it in the beginning of the season or after the All-Star break. To me, rest is a good night's rest and taking care of your body and being prepared to play. Hard work is a lot of things that a lot of other people do that are not athletes and coaches. It's hard to do and we're all blessed and privileged. But the rest thing is blown out of proportion, in my opinion. You're talking about a game that we love."

For Brooks, it is simple. He wants players to do their job.

"I think we're all obligated to earn our keep. We all sign contracts to play games and play as many minutes as the coach wants you to play. I think it's important. I don't know what has changed. Obviously, when I played you didn't sit out games. You didn't even sit out practices. There was a lot of trash talking if you sat out a practice. You didn't want to be called those names. So, you took pride. You can imagine some of the names: soft and Charmin, there's all kinds of [names]. I'm going to keep it PG. I've read comments on how much [technology and training methods] have these days and you want rest on top of that? Some players need it. There's no question."

All of this even inspired Brooks to bring up a 'back in my day' story from his playing career. And it's a good one.

"I wouldn't say that players were tougher. They weren't given options. We weren't given options. We weren't given the option to take practice off. Our practices were long," he said. "I'm pretty good [these days]. My knees are hurting, my back is aching and my elbows hurt, my ankles hurt. But I wouldn't change anything. I loved what I did. I loved to compete. I had toothaches twice and I wanted to play the game, so I told the dentist to take them out. He said 'you're going to have trouble when you're 75 and trying to chew.' I said 'I'll worry about that then. I did do that. But that was nothing."

[RELATED: BTR: To rest or not to rest? NBA's issue is bigger than that]

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John Wall embracing role as assistant coach during injury rehab

John Wall embracing role as assistant coach during injury rehab

WASHINGTON -- John Wall has already made enough money during his basketball career to last a lifetime and his new supermax contract worth $170 million is just kicking in. When he is done playing in the NBA, he doesn't have to do anything at all if he doesn't want to.

But there is at least a small part of Wall that believes coaching could be in his future. He loves the game enough to not rule out the possibility.

This year will give him a taste of what being a coach is all about. While he rehabs his ruptured left Achilles, he will serve as an unofficial assistant to head coach Scott Brooks. Wall will be asked to break down film with players, advise on plays to run and help the team's young point guards in practice.

Wall isn't sure as of today whether he wants to coach when his playing days are over. But he may have an answer in just a few months.

"I think this year will tell me whether I can be a coach or not," Wall told NBC Sports Washington on the Wizards Talk podcast. 

"I think you have to have a lot of patience and you've gotta know how to interact with every player. Every player's attitudes and character and mood swings are totally different. I learned from when a coach tried to coach me when I was young and I wasn't the guy to coach."

Wizards general manager Tommy Sheppard envisions Wall as an important part of the locker room, even when he isn't playing. Part of his role may include some tough conversations with players. As Sheppard says, Wall may be able to deliver some messages that resonate more from a peer than if they came from a coach. 

Wall knows he can help in that regard. He has long been a vocal presence for the Wizards and had to assume the role as a team leader at an early age. After coming in as the No. 1 overall pick, he was a franchise player from the time he was 19 years old.

Wall's personality may also lend itself to those duties. He is very honest, whether it be with teammates or the media. 

"I like to speak my mind," he said. "It's like my momma always told me, 'I'd rather you speak your mind and say what you want to say, but say it in a respectful manner and a respectful way.'"

Wall, in fact, has a detailed philosophy on being honest. He doesn't like to lie whether it's in a media setting, to teammates or in everyday life.

It's not quite a Jim Carrey in 'Liar, Liar' deal, but Wall sees no point in beating around the bush. If he has something to say to a teammate or the media, he will say it.

"I don't know how to not give you the truth," he said. "What I've learned is that when you lie, you've gotta remember that lie exactly the way you said it for the next 12 people you tell it to. So, why make it that tough?"

Wall is set to miss at least the first few months of the Wizards' 2019-20 season and he could be sidelined the entire year. He said he hopes to have a similar impact that Kristi Tolliver did with the Mystics this past season where she remained active as a veteran leader in the locker room despite not being able to help the team on the floor for weeks due to a knee injury.

Missing so much time due to injury is not the ideal situation for Wall, but he plans to make the most of it.

"It will make my game a lot smarter and better for when I come back," he said.

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After setbacks in rehab, John Wall is appreciating the little things in life

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After setbacks in rehab, John Wall is appreciating the little things in life

WASHINGTON -- John Wall has been all smiles in public when discussing his rehab from Achilles surgery. He has even remarked how smoothly this recovery has gone compared to others he's underwent in the past.

But his road back from a ruptured left Achilles has not been entirely free of obstacles. He revealed to NBC Sports Washington on the Wizards Talk podcast recently that he dealt with an infection that delayed him getting out of his walking boot.

That was already weeks after he first had surgery to remove bone spurs from his heel in January. He had a series of infections following that procedure, one of which helped doctors discover his Achilles had torn during a fall in his home.

Wall can admit now after the fact it was a difficult time for him.

"I've just put in a lot of hard work," he said. "For me to be where I'm at right now, with all the setbacks and infections and then finding out my Achilles was ruptured and then going through another infection, it was like 'man, when can I ever get past that point of just getting out of the boot and walking?'"

What made that last part particularly frustrating was where Wall makes his offseason home. He summers in Miami, a place notorious for its humidity.

"I was in Miami during the summertime in a boot. Like, man, I don't want to be in hot Miami in a boot, sweating," he said.

Nowadays, things are much better for Wall. He is doing on-court work at the Wizards' practice facility. He can shoot jumpers and do individual ball-handling and passing drills. He can jog and lift weights.

After months of waiting to just have his walking boot come off, Wall is very appreciative to simply be able to do anything on the basketball court.

"Just to do the ball-handling and be able to shoot and do the weight-lifting, that's a great aspect [of my progress]. It makes it easier for me because I'm in a great space where it's fun," he said. 

"I'm able to do what I'm able to do, even if I'm not playing at a high speed and running up and down, I'm able to shoot and do ball-handling. That's what I love to do."

Wall continues to make progress, now nine months removed from the Achilles surgery he had on Feb. 12. He is likely to be out at least three more months, and he could miss all of the 2019-20 season.

At some point, Wall may get restless, but he continues to preach patience towards his return. When asked by Chris Miller if he will start bothering the coaches soon to play, he said he's just happy to be back on the court in practice.

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