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Wizards' history at trade deadline has produced mixed results

Wizards' history at trade deadline has produced mixed results

What a team does at the NBA trade deadline generally relates directly to whether they think they can compete in that year's postseason. Good teams headed to the playoffs may find value in adding another piece for the stretch run, while teams heading towards the NBA draft lottery often have nothing to offer in trades at all.

Because of that, the Wizards have found themselves in very different states at this time of the year throughout their history. From 2002 through 2009, for instance, they didn't make any deals at the deadline. Yet since 2010, they have made nine trades and at least one per season.

With the 2017 trade deadline coming up (Thursday at 3 p.m.), here is a look back at each trade the Wizards made at the deadline since the year 2000 with analysis. The first deal was made by Michael Jordan with the rest have come under Ernie Grunfeld's tenure as president of the Wizards. The trade information is from Basketball-Reference.com:

February 22, 2001: Traded Calvin Booth, Obinna Ekezie and Juwan Howard to the Dallas Mavericks for Courtney Alexander, Hubert Davis, Christian Laettner, Etan Thomas, Loy Vaught and cash.

Analysis: Howard was still getting it done at the age of 27 with 18 points and seven rebounds a game for the Wizards, but it wasn't translating into wins, so they traded him to Dallas in an eight-player deal. In return they got some veterans and some intriguing young players like Alexander and Thomas, but the trade didn't ultimately amount to much. The Mavericks later shipped Howard to Denver in a deal for Nick Van Exel and others that helped them reach the conference finals in 2003.

[RELATED: Porter isn't, and never has been, available for a trade]

February 13, 2010: Traded Caron Butler, Brendan Haywood and DeShawn Stevenson to the Dallas Mavericks for Drew Gooden, Josh Howard, Quinton Ross and James Singleton.

Analysis: The first trade of the Wizards' pre-John Wall rebuild sent three starters from their 2007-08 playoff team to Dallas for four players, including Gooden who would be dealt elsewhere just four days later. Howard was the best of the players they received, but he only appeared in 22 games across two seasons for the Wizards due to injuries. Following this trade, he played in just 76 more NBA games before his career was over.

February 17, 2010: As part of a 3-team trade, the Washington Wizards traded Drew Gooden to the Los Angeles Clippers; the Washington Wizards traded Antawn Jamison to the Cleveland Cavaliers; the Cleveland Cavaliers traded Zydrunas Ilgauskas, Emir Preldzic and a 2010 1st round draft pick (Lazar Hayward was later selected 30th) to the Washington Wizards; the Los Angeles Clippers traded Sebastian Telfair to the Cleveland Cavaliers; and the Los Angeles Clippers traded Al Thornton to the Washington Wizards.

Analysis: In another trade to dismantle the mid-2000s Wizards, they sent Jamison to play with LeBron James in Cleveland. Ilgauskas never played for the Wizards, the first round pick didn't work out and Thornton was out of the league soon after.

February 18, 2010: Traded Dominic McGuire and cash to the Sacramento Kings for a 2010 2nd round draft pick. Sacramento did not receive the 2nd round draft pick because it was top 41 protected.

Analysis: This was a minor trade that saw McGuire leave after a disappointing tenure in Washington. He was a very good defensive player in college, but couldn't make it work in the pros.

February 23, 2011: Traded Hilton Armstrong and Kirk Hinrich to the Atlanta Hawks for Mike Bibby, Jordan Crawford, Maurice Evans and a 2011 1st round draft pick (Chris Singleton was later selected 18th overall).

Analysis: The trade looked much better when it happened than it does in hindsight. To acquire a first round pick for what the Wizards gave up was no small feat, it just didn't amount to much in Singleton, who never realized his potential.

[RELATED: Lou Williams no longer a trade option for Wizards]

March 15, 2012: As part of a 3-team trade, the Washington Wizards traded Nick Young to the Los Angeles Clippers; the Washington Wizards traded JaVale McGee and Ronny Turiaf to the Denver Nuggets; the Denver Nuggets traded Nene to the Washington Wizards; and the Los Angeles Clippers traded Brian Cook and a 2015 2nd round draft pick (Arturas Gudaitis was later selected) to the Washington Wizards.

Analysis: This was an important trade for the Wizards. They got rid of Young and McGee and brought in Nene, who brought a veteran presence to the locker room and helped lead the Wizards to two playoff appearances.

February 21, 2013: Traded Jordan Crawford to the Boston Celtics for Leandro Barbosa and Jason Collins.

Analysis: The Wizards felt compelled to trade Crawford and didn't get much in return. Barbosa had recently torn his ACL and ultimately restored his career, but that comeback didn't come in Washington. Barbosa never played a game for the Wizards, but later became a valuable piece for the Warriors and won a title in 2015.

February 20, 2014: As part of a 3-team trade, the Washington Wizards traded Eric Maynor and a 2015 2nd round draft pick (Arturas Gudaitis was later selected) to the Philadelphia 76ers; the Washington Wizards traded Jan Vesely to the Denver Nuggets; the Denver Nuggets traded a 2016 2nd round draft pick to the Philadelphia 76ers; the Denver Nuggets traded Andre Miller to the Washington Wizards; and the Philadelphia 76ers traded a 2014 2nd round draft pick to the Washington Wizards. (2014 2nd-rd pick was protected and not conveyed)

Analysis: This one had a lot going on. Not only did the Wizards part with Jan Vesely, a major bust after being selected sixth overall, they brought in Miller who at 37 still provided an upgrade as a backup point guard. He didn't score much (3.8 ppg), but he ran the offense competently and was a decent distributor (3.5 apg).

February 19, 2015: Traded Andre Miller to the Sacramento Kings for Ramon Sessions.

Analysis: Miller was good in the short-term, but the Wizards decided to get younger almost exactly a year later. Sessions was a better scorer and ended up spending a full season with them the following year.

February 18, 2016: Traded DeJuan Blair, Kris Humphries and a 2016 1st round draft pick to the Phoenix Suns for Markieff Morris. (2016 1st-Rd pick is top-9 protected)

Analysis: Some (myself included) criticized this deal when it went down because the Suns seemed desperate to part with Morris after some off-the-court troubles, and it's never easy to give up a first round pick. But lately the traded has looked better and better by the game, as Morris has emerged as a perfect complement to the rest of the Wizards' starting lineup. In his last 29 games since Dec. 18, Morris is averaging 16.6 points and 7.9 rebounds per game. Add it all up and this is probably the best trade the Wizards have ever made at the deadline.

Honorable mention: Speaking of Grunfeld, when he ran the Milwaukee Bucks he once traded future Hall of Famer Ray Allen, a first round pick and two players to the Seattle Supersonics for future Hall of Famer Gary Payton and another veteran. Now that is a blockbuster.

[RELATED: Report: Wizards interested in T'Wolves' forward]

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Rui Hachimura's learning curve can be seen on offense late in games

Rui Hachimura's learning curve can be seen on offense late in games

WASHINGTON -- Wizards forward Rui Hachimura has translated so smoothly to the NBA level that it is easy to forget he is still just a rookie with only 31 games under his belt. For a reminder of his inexperience, just look at the fourth quarter.

Hachimura tends to start games hot on the offensive end, like he did on Friday in the Wizards' loss to the Cavaliers when he had eight points by the end of the first quarter. But he scored only nine points after that and went scoreless through seven minutes in the fourth.

That has been a consistent theme for him this season. He averages 4.8 points in the first quarter shooting 48.4 percent from the field, 4.0 points in the second shooting 57 percent and then 4.3 points on 47.9 percent in the third. In the fourth quarter those numbers plummet to 1.9 points on average and 33.3 percent shooting.

Basically, Hachimura often comes out on fire but then slows down considerably once opponents make midgame changes. Against the Cavs, Hachimura said it was because they disrupted passing lanes.

"They are an NBA team. They just adjusted. They didn't want me to catch the ball. They didn't let me just catch the ball. I think that's why," he said.

The Wizards have seen teams switch defensive match-ups midgame to counter Hachimura. Sometimes taking away his midrange jumper will be prioritized. The Cavs seemed to find success playing Hachimura more physically in the second half, bumping him away from his comfort zones.

Over time, Hachimura can improve his ability to sustain scoring throughout games simply by becoming more versatile. The more consistent he becomes at making three-point shots and creating off the dribble, the more difficult it will be for teams to stop him. As long as he keeps improving, he will reach a point where he can stay ahead of the defense with a multitude of counters.

Developing a more reliable outside game and more dribble combinations will take some time. For now, Hachimura believes the key to him keeping up his scoring pace involves working with his teammates, particularly star shooting guard Bradley Beal.

"I just gotta connect more with Brad. Brad is the one everybody is trying to guard. Screens and pick-and-rolls with him, that kind of stuff will help me," Hachimura said.

Hachimura's game against the Cavaliers reflected how the team played overall. After scoring 41 points in the first quarter, they managed only 42 in the second half. They blew a 16-point lead and lost, 113-108.

So, he wasn't alone. And those rooting for Hachimura to round out his game should feel good about his odds. He has a relentless work ethic and is often staying after practice to go over film with player development coach Dave Adkins.

Hachimura is perceptive and driven to improve. In order to take the next step as a scorer, he will have to get better at closing games.

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Tristan Thompson calls Bradley Beal one of the best shooting guards in the league

Tristan Thompson calls Bradley Beal one of the best shooting guards in the league

Cavaliers center Tristan Thompson spoke with reporters after the team's victory over the Wizards Friday night, praising Bradley Beal, who was snubbed from All-Star consideration this season despite averaging nearly 30 points-per-game.

The Cavaliers held the Wizards to just 21 points in the fourth quarter, and Thompson said their main focus was neutralizing Beal.

"The Wizards are really good offensively when they are making their runs," Thompson said postgame. "Bradley Beal is an All-Star in our league. One of the top-three two-guards in our league right now, so we were just trying to make it tough for him."

Beal finished the night with 26 points, but struggled from the floor. Beal shot 9-for-28 from the floor and the Cavaliers' stingy defense was clearly a factor.

Beal and the Wizards will have a chance to get back on track on Sunday night at Capital One Arena when they host the Chicago Bulls for the final time this season.

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