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Wizards' John Wall, Bradley Beal must put aside 'tendency to dislike each other on the court'

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Wizards' John Wall, Bradley Beal must put aside 'tendency to dislike each other on the court'

The high temperatures outside the arena at Las Vegas summer league, where John Wall sat courtside to watch the Wizards play, were punishing.

Bradley Beal walked in with his girlfriend, fresh off agreeing to $128 million max contract, and when he sat down there was a gulf of unfilled chairs between the two.

The two self-described "cornerstones" of the Wizards couldn't have been farther away from each other.

It's no secret that the Wizards' future -- and two best and highest-paid players -- have work to do with building their relationship.

It's Wall's seventh season and Beal's fifth.

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"I think a lot of times we have a tendency to dislike each other on the court. … We got to be able to put that to the side. If you miss somebody on one play or don’t have something go right ... as long as you come to each other and talk. If I starting arguing with somebody I’m cool. I’m just playing basketball," Wall said in a sitdown interview with CSN's Chris Miller that airs tonight, Wizards Central: Offseason Grind, at 7:30 p.m. ET.

"Now that you have your money you got to go out there and improve your game. I want you to be an All-Star just as much as I’m an All-Star.  If we were playing well as a tandem like the other two superstars that play together as a backcourt, play as a tandem, one night it’s going to be his night, one night it’s going to be mine, some nights it might be both of us. Those are nights it’s going to be tough to beat us."

Since the backcourt has played together for four years, there's a tendency to asume that they're best friends. But they don't spend much time together outside of Verizon Center and they have had to be separated on more than one occassion after blowups.

Last season, Alan Anderson made peace after preseason game when Beal was upset. Two seasons ago it was Garrett Temple, Beal's best friend on the team who now is with the Sacramento Kings, to restrain him. Both veterans are gone after free agency this summer.

In piecemeal, Wall and Beal have spoken publicly about how they can disagree with passion.

In a 41-41 season that had the Wizards out of the playoffs, Wall concluded the overall bickering amongst teammates was as much of a problem as the injuries.

One of the early signs of the season going south came after an embarrassing 123-106 loss to the Indiana Pacers in which Wall remarked postgame he'd only gotten nine shots up in 31 minutes.

He didn't mention anyone by name, but it appeared to mean he likely was unhappy that Beal took 22 in comparison. The next night, in a road game vs. the Charlotte Hornets, Wall predictably had nine shots by the end of the first quarter in a 101-87 loss.

Beal's first injury last season was a shoulder contusion that came a few games prior to that episode, when he went down to the floor for a loose ball and took a knee against the Atlanta Hawks.

While teammates ran to his aid, Wall bypassed Beal and walked to the other end of the court during the dead ball. This sort of body language speaks more than any words.

A good sign for both was towards the end of last season they did hang out during a road trip in New York, but it will take more than that if they are going to be the backcourt they were in the 2015 playoffs when the Wizards were Wall's broken hand/wrist from advancing to the conference finals. 

The 2016-17 version of the Wizards won't have Nene, Jared Dudley, Temple, Anderson, Drew Gooden, Paul Pierce or Trevor Ariza to calm tense situations.

If Wall and Beal are truly going to be leaders, they have to be the voices of reason and not fan any flames with the likes of Trey Burke, Tomas Satoransky, Andrew Nicholson, Kelly Oubre and likely Jarell Eddie.

"It’s tough because we’re both alphas. It’s always tough when you have two guys who firmly believe in themselves, who will bet on themselves against anybody else, who want to be that guy. We both can be that guy," Beal said.

"Sometimes I think we both lose sight of the fact that we need each other. I wouldn’t be in the situation I’m in without John. John wouldn’t be in the situation he’s in without me, without the rest of the team. It goes hand-in-hand so it’s kind of a pride thing. We got to (hash) out our pride, fiigure out what our goals are individually, help each other achieve those goals, figure out what our team goal is, where do we see ourselves five years from now, 10 years from now and go from there."

It's a rough patch that coach Randy Wittman never was able to smooth out.

This is where new coach Scott Brooks is expected to help in their development as the leaders witth the core veterans gutted from the roster, some of whom insisted that during games it can be difficult to get through to the backcourt when they're frustrated.

"Guys got to know their role. I think that’s the key. I think with coach Brooks coming in he’s going to hold everybody accountable starting with me," Wall said. "Just make sure everybody know what their role is. If everybody buys into their role, we’ll be fine."

Wall signed an $80 million deal for five years in 2013 for what was then a max deal under a $58.7 million salary cap. Beal signed his max for five years under a $94.1 million cap.

This was viewed as Wall's team since he was drafted No. 1 overall in 2010, became a three-time All-Star and second-team All-Defense. Beal, who played a career-low 55 games last season, has yet to achieve those sorts of honors. Wall has to be willing to share. 

“I want it all to be on me. At the same time I want him to be right there with me. He’s my sidekick. I’m A. He’s A-1. He’s right there," Wall said. "That’s something we got to do on the first day of training camp. We have to go in there and understand and get on the same page.

"If we’re not on the same page and we have our ups and downs we’ll keep dealing with the same problems. We have to get control of it. I think it’s hanging out off the court, doing those little things (helps)."

Wall called on his brief college experience when he spent one year at Kentucky. He had All-America teammates in DeMarcus Cousins and Eric Bledsoe. Wall, of course, was everyone's favorite. Cousins is an All-Star and now has won a gold medal as an Olympian for USA Basketball. Bledsoe is a starting point guard for the Phoenix Suns.

"It kind of goes back to when I was in college," Wall said. "Me and DeMarcus, E-Bled, they all knew I was getting all the media attention but every time I win I brought those guys along with me. I didn’t leave them behind. That’s because we hung out so much. We built a bond together. When you build that bond it’s kind of hard to break."

Ideally, Wall and Beal will reach that comfort level but they can't force a friendship.

They can be, however, better professionals as both admitted in exit interviews. To grow into the leaders they claim to be for 2016-17 means they can't contribute to the chaos that produced players-only meetings (called by role players) in two of the last three seasons.

The way they vibed during the 3-1 start last season, with both taking turns leading the way to close fourth quarters, is what they have to be for most of 82 games. Not what they were for the other 78.

MORE WIZARDS: WALL'S PRIMARY KEY FOR WIZARDS SUCCESS IN 2016-17

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Scott Brooks on how journeyman veterans like Ish Smith can be leaders by example

Scott Brooks on how journeyman veterans like Ish Smith can be leaders by example

WASHINGTON -- When identifying leaders from an outside perspective, it is only natural to look at the Washington Wizards and see Bradley Beal and John Wall, their two All-Star guards. Logic would suggest they set the tone for younger, less experienced players, that they are the ones the rookies should look up to.

But Wizards head coach Scott Brooks sees similar value in less-heralded members of his team, the journeyman veterans to whom nothing has been given. Guys like Ish Smith and Gary Payton II have bounced around the league to varying degrees. In Payton's case, that has included extended time in the G-League.

Brooks has been tasked with creating an environment for the Wizards that is conducive to the development of young players and he believes those types of veterans set an important example.

"If you're really good, you have two or three All-Stars on your team," Brooks said. "But the league is made up of guys like Ish. His story can help the younger guys make it and stay in the league. It's what the league is about. He has the grit, the fiber, the substance and the experience to share with all the players who are trying to make it."

Brooks has used similar language to describe Payton II, who was first signed by the team to a 10-day contract last season. He was let go, then returned this past December and then had his contract guaranteed for the rest of the season earlier this month.

"He's fought and he's been cut many times and sometimes those are the guys you want in your program because they have that fiber, that toughness and that anger because they know that it can go away," Brooks said.

Wizards general manager Tommy Sheppard has said on several occasions they want Brooks to install a culture and mindset with their young roster similar to the one he helped build in Oklahoma City. Smith happens to remind Brooks of one of his former players with the Thunder.

"I love guys on a team like Ish. We kind of had that guy with Nick Collison [in OKC], just a winning player on and off the court. Ish is the same way. I look at Ish the same exact way," Brooks said.

Collison averaged a modest 5.9 points in 14 NBA seasons, but was so respected for his leadership role that his jersey number was retired by the Thunder last year. 

There is another person guys like Smith and Payton II remind Brooks of and that is himself. Before he became a coach, he was a 10-year NBA player. And he carved out that career as an undrafted, undersized point guard.

He was constantly fighting for his NBA future on the fringe of rosters and was able to stick around only because of his hard work and toughness.

Though he played with some great teammates like Hakeem Olajuwon, Charles Barkley and Patrick Ewing, Brooks likes to think he left his own mark.

"I always took pride in having a relationship with the best player to the, well, myself; the worst player," he said.

"This game, it's a family and it's fun and it's about relationships; empowering and inspiring one another. You don't have to be a star player to do that. I've had great conversations with Olajuwon. I've had great conversations with players that only play on a 10-day or a year in the league. I took pride in it and I think Ish does the same thing. I think it's pretty important that we all are blessed and honored to be in the league, that now it's your job to leave your situation better than when you started it. We have a couple of guys on our team that can really carry on what we want our team to be about."

Ultimately, though, the Wizards' young players have to put in the necessary work to reach their potential. Brooks can teach them lessons directly and guys like Smith can do so indirectly.

But the players themselves have to understand the message.

"Now it's up to the younger players to listen to it. It's one thing to listen to John and Brad, but there's a great chance you're not going to be as good as John or Brad. There's a chance you're going to be a player like Ish," Brooks said.

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Mystics unveil 2020 schedule, featuring the first-ever Commissioner's Cup

Mystics unveil 2020 schedule, featuring the first-ever Commissioner's Cup

The Washington Mystics and the WNBA have announced their schedules for the 2020 season.

Expanded to 36 games for the first time in the league's history, each team will have an additional home and away contest on the year. As defending WNBA Champions, the Mystics will play the WNBA's first nationally televised game of the season at home on May 16 against the Los Angeles Sparks on ESPN. Other teams will open their season on May. 15 and May 17. 

It will be the first of four Mystics games that will be broadcast across the country. They also host the Storm on June 2 (ESPN2), the Sun on June 28 (ESPN2) and Sept. 20 (ABC) - all of which are at home. 

The schedule also includes a full month off for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics from July 13 - Aug. 13. After the athletes return stateside, the WNBA will host the inaugural Commissioner's Cup which will feature the top two teams from each conference based on conference record. The Commissioner's Cup is a new addition to the league in the 2020 collective bargaining agreement. 

WASHINGTON MYSTICS 2020 SCHEDULE

May 16: Los Angeles Sparks at Mystics - 4:00 p.m. ET (ESPN)
May 20: Mystics at Indiana Fever - 7:00 p.m. ET
May 22: Mystics at Atlanta Dream - 7:00 p.m. ET
May 29: Mystics at Seattle Storm - 10:00 p.m. ET
May 31: Mystics at Phoenix Mercury - 6:00 p.m. ET

June 2: Seattle Storm at Mystics - 8:00 p.m. ET (ESPN2)
June 5: Indiana Fever at Mystics - 7:00 p.m. ET

June 7: Mystics at Chicago Sky - 6:00 p.m. ET
June 9: New York Liberty at Mystics - 7:00 p.m. ET
June 11: Atlanta Dream at Mystics - 7:00 p.m. ET
June 14: Chicago Sky at Mystics - 3:00 p.m ET

June 17: Mystics at Chicago Sky - 8:00 p.m. ET
June 23: Mystics at Minnesota Lynx - 8:00 p.m ET
June 25: Mystics at Indiana Fever - 7:00 p.m. ET
June 28: Connecticut Sun at Mystics - 3:00 p.m. ET (ESPN2)

July 3: Mystics at Atlanta Dream - 7:00 p.m. ET
July 5: Mystics at Connecticut Sun - 3:00 p.m. ET
July 6: Mystics at New York Liberty - 7:00 p.m. ET
July 8: New York Liberty at Mystics - 11:30 a.m. ET (Capital One Arena)
July 10: Minnesota Lynx at Mystics - 7:00 p.m. ET

July 13 - Aug. 13: Olympic Break

Aug. 14: Commissioner's Cup

Aug. 16: Atlanta Dream at Mystics - 3:00 p.m. ET
Aug. 18: Mystics at Dallas Wings - 8:00 p.m. ET
Aug. 21: Las Vegas Aces at Mystics - 7:00 p.m. ET
Aug. 23: Los Angeles Sparks at Mystics - 3:00 p.m. ET
Aug. 25: Phoenix Mercury at Mystics - 7:00 p.m. ET
Aug. 28: Dallas Wings at Mystics - 7:00 p.m. ET

Aug. 30: Mystics at Dallas Wings - 4:00 p.m. ET

Sept. 1: Mystics at Las Vegas Aces - 10:00 p.m ET
Sept. 3: Mystics at Los Angeles Sparks - 10:30 p.m. ET
Sept. 6: Mystics at Phoenix Mercury - 3:00 p.m. ET
Sept. 8: Mystics at Seattle Storm - 10:00 p.m. ET
Sept. 11: Minnesota Lynx at Mystics - 7:00 p.m. ET
Sept. 13: Indiana Fever at Mystics - 3:00 p.m. ET

Sept. 16: Mystics at New York Liberty - 7:00 p.m. ET
Sept. 18: Los Vegas Aces at Mystics - 7:00 p.m. ET
Sept. 20: Connecticut Sun at Mystics - 3:00 p.m. ET (ABC)

In addition to the rematch of the 2019 WNBA Finals on June 28 and Sept. 20, the Sun and the Mystics will square off in Connecticut on July 5.

After a contentious WNBA Semifinals matchup with the Las Vegas Aces, the two will play on Aug. 21, Sept. 1 and 18. Liz Cambage's "get in the weight room" comment electrified an already competitive series and became a memorable one on and off the court. 

There is one back-to-back on the docket on July 5 and 6. It will also be a part of three road games in four days at the beginning of July. 

All home games will be at the Entertainment and Sports Arena in Southeast D.C. except for July 8's game against the New York Liberty. That contest will be in their old home confines of Capital One Arena.

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