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Wizards lock in center Jaleel Roberts for Las Vegas summer league

Wizards lock in center Jaleel Roberts for Las Vegas summer league

When Jaleel Roberts competed for the Wizards at Las Vegas summer league and in training camp a year ago, it was with an eye towards the future.

The 7-1 center, who the Wizards paid to attend a skills camp in 2015, played in Australia this past season and will be in Las Vegas for summer league again next month, several persons with knowledge of the situation told CSNmidatlantic.com. Roberts confirmed to CSN late Tuesday night that he'll return.  

This time, however, he has a more realistic chance with about eight roster spots available. The only center currently under contract is Marcin Gortat when free agency opens July 1 and younger, more athletic bigs are preferred.

The Wizards will hold mini-camp leading up to the July 8-18 event in Las Vegas and will take a 12-man roster that so far includes Roberts, Kelly Oubre, Aaron White and Jarell Eddie.

All have played for the Wizards in Las Vegas previously. Eddie, who CSN confirmed would participate Tuesday, was with them two years ago. White is back in the area after spending a year in Germany and has worked out with him. White stopped by CSN studios to discuss summer league and his future.

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Bradley Beal becomes youngest player in NBA history to reach 900 career 3-pointers

Bradley Beal becomes youngest player in NBA history to reach 900 career 3-pointers

Before Wednesday's Wizards-Cavs game, J.R. Smith held the record for youngest NBA player to reach 900 career 3-pointers. 

With 4:31 left in the opening quarter. Bradley Beal caught a pass from Otto Porter and knocked down his 900th career triple

The 25-year-old is a career 39 percent 3-point shooter. Through 13 games this season, Beal is stroking it at 34 percent, but scoring in a variety of ways this season with an average of over 22 points per game. 

Washington is looking for its third consecutive win. 

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Former Hoya great Jeff Green says slow your roll on Mac McClung

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USA Today Sports Images

Former Hoya great Jeff Green says slow your roll on Mac McClung

Through three games as a freshman for the Georgetown Hoyas, Mac McClung has lived up to his hype as a social media sensation, at least when it comes to his ability to wow crowds with high-flying dunks. 

McClung has a long way to go to become a true star in college basketball, but the kid can fly. Already, he has provided several viral highlights.

Wizards forward Jeff Green is one of the best players in Georgetown's decorated basketball history, and on Wednesday after shootaround, he weighed in on McClung's flashy start.

Green, now an 11-year NBA veteran, spoke from the perspective of a guy who's been around the block. He says people should calm down a bit and wait to see what McClung becomes.

"Yeah. I've seen a lot of him. The guy has been great, but it's not just him. I think because of the internet people have just focused on him," Green said. 

Green went on to reference McClung's famous YouTube mixtapes some more.

"It's just the way the world is. People are focused on the internet and he's all over the internet and that's all you think about. They have a good collection of guys," he said. "Georgetown is a team. It's not just one person." 

Now, just because Green was downplaying the hype for McClung, who last year set the Virginia state high school scoring record, and did so by passing former Hoya great Allen Iverson, doesn't mean he isn't a fan. Green thinks McClung has a chance to be really good and probably far surpass his three-star recruiting grade.

"It's not hype. The kid is good," Green said. "You can't put these expectations. What have people been calling him? White Iverson. There's no other player that's gonna be Allen Iverson. He's gonna be who he's gonna be."

Green gave a further explanation that seemed to suggest the word 'expectations' had struck a cord. Green himself was a three-star recruit and went on to exceed that grade by becoming the fifth overall pick in the 2007 NBA Draft.

"People put expectations on other people and then when they don't grow into those expectations, in their eyes he's a bad player. You can't do that. Let him grow into what he's going to be and then you define him," Green said.