Wizards

Wizards

Wizards' coach Scott Brooks confirmed on Tuesday that he did receive an apology from his Warriors counterpart Steve Kerr following the incident between the teams on Sunday that saw Washington guard Brandon Jennings shove Golden State center JaVale McGee to the floor for shooting a three late in a blowout win.

Brooks understands why Kerr wanted to apologize, but said he will not hold what happened against the Warriors organization.

"We've exchanged text messages. I have great respect for their organization. They are a championship team," Brooks said. "The last minute did not take anything away from how they play. You don't want their five-man shooting a three when they're up 20, but that's not of my business. But they won the game fair and square. We had a chance to play better for the 48 minutes before that and we did not do that."

Brooks went on to say acknowledge that there are some unwritten rule sin the game of basketball. In-game policing between players may be more prevalent in other sports like baseball, but there's no question in Brooks' mind that goes on in the NBA.

[RELATED: McGee said he was glad he got pushed late in Wizards' loss]

Brooks, for one, subscribes to those ideas and standards for his own team.

"I have some rules. The guys know," Brooks said. "When you're up [big], you don't want to shoot threes and run alley-oop plays or run the score up. Golden State doesn't do that. They took one bad shot, but that's not who they are. I'm not going to look at them and wish bad luck for them."

 

In Sunday's loss, the Wizards had essentially conceded the game by emptying their bench late in the fourth quarter and down over 20 points. The Warriors decided to leave Stephen Curry and Draymond Green on the floor as both were chasing personal statistics. Green was going for a triple-double and Curry eclipsed the 40-point mark. Then, there was McGee's shot.

All of that happened after the game was well in hand, hence the problem. Brooks understands that, but takes issue with people calling that time in a game "garbage time."

Here's why:

"There's no garbage time. I don't call it garbage time because I was in there a lot [as a player]. So, I take offense to garbage time. I always told people that 'it's my garbage time and you wish you could be in there playing during those minutes.' Players that were calling it that were not quite good enough to make a team. So, that was my jab back at them."

There you go. Follow the game's unwritten rules, just don't call it 'garbage time.'

[RELATED: Kerr wishes McGee handled his shot differently]