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Wizards at Sixers: TV, live stream and radio info, things to watch

Wizards at Sixers: TV, live stream and radio info, things to watch

John Wall, Bradley Beal and the Washington Wizards battle Jahlil Okafor and the Philadelphia 76ers on Friday night as they aim to continue rising the ranks of the NBA's Eastern Conference.

Here is all you need to know: TV, live stream and radio info, tip-off time, plus three things to watch…

WASHINGTON WIZARDS at PHILADELPHIA 76ERS

Where: Wells Fargo Center
Tip-off: 7 p.m.
TV: CSN+ (coverage begins at 6:30 p.m.)
Live stream: CSNmidatlantic.com
Radio: 1500 AM

Three things to watch...

Can the Wizards carry it over?

The All-Star break came at an unfortunate time for the Wizards, who were absolutely rolling. They had won 18 of their last 21 games and 11 of their last 12. They were one of the hottest teams in the league and then had to break for a full week.

Now the Wizards return hoping to pick up where they left off. Their schedule gets much tougher after Friday, so they might want to take care of business against the lowly Sixers. After Philly, they host the Jazz and Warriors, then play Toronto twice. Losing to Philly would not be ideal.

[RELATED: NBA Power Rankings: Post trade deadline outlook]

The debut of Bojan

The Wizards will have some new faces on the bench Friday night after their Wednesday trade with the Brooklyn Nets that brought in small forward Bojan Bogdanovic and big man Chris McCullough. Bogdanovic is going to have a more prominent role, so it will be interesting to see what impact he can make on Friday night. They need to get him up to speed quickly with just 27 games left in the season.

What will be important to watch is what lineups head coach Scott Brooks uses to deploy Bogdanovic. Can he play the two alongside John Wall and give Bradley Beal a rest? Can he co-exist with other forwards like Otto Porter and Kelly Oubre, Jr.? Speeking of Oubre, how many minutes will he now get with more competition at his position? 

[RELATED: Film study: Bojan Bogdanovic breakdown]

Still no Embiid

The Wizards and Sixers will face off for the third time on Friday night and the final time in Philadelphia this season. And for the third time of out three chances, Sixers star Joel Embiid will not play. The first two games he missed due to a minutes restriction, as Philly was cautious in his recovery. This time around he will sit due to a torn meniscus in his left knee.

Just because the Sixers have missed Embiid against the Wizards, though, doesn't mean they have not been competitive. The Wizards lost in Philly on Nov. 16 when Beal sat out with a hamstring injury. They then led by 13 points in the second quarter of an eventual Wizards win on Jan. 14.

[RELATED: Barkley and Shaq say John Wall is East's best point guard]

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A missed timeout baffles Aces coach Bill Laimbeer, helps Mystics hold on for Game 1 win

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A missed timeout baffles Aces coach Bill Laimbeer, helps Mystics hold on for Game 1 win

Las Vegas Aces coach Bill Laimbeer is hard to miss at 6-foot-11 with a booming voice that with its deep timber can level anyone standing within 100 feet. 

But as his underdog team pushed the ball up court in the frantic closing seconds of Tuesday’s WNBA semifinal game against the Mystics, Laimbeer might as well have been an invisible ghost. 

With Washington ahead 97-95, an Elena Delle Donne miss with 4.5 seconds to play gave the Aces a chance. Laimbeer wanted a timeout to set a play. He didn’t get it. He screamed again. No whistle. Maybe the roaring crowd at the Entertainment and Sports Arena drowned out Laimbeer's furious pleading. Whatever the case, referee Tiara Cruse didn’t grant it and Kelsey Plum’s rushed floater at the buzzer missed.

The favored Mystics, the top seed in the WNBA playoffs after a 26-8 regular season, held on for a win on a night when they were admittedly far from their best. The Aces were left pondering what might have been if they could have just set up a final a play. Washington took a 1-0 lead in the best-of-five series with Game 2 set for Thursday in the District. 

“I was right standing next to the referee by design. As soon as they missed a shot I was going to be yelling “Timeout! Timeout! Timeout!”,” Laimbeer said. “They missed the shot, we got the rebound. I yelled it five times and she even looked at me when I was yelling and made a conscious decision not to call a timeout.”

Laimbeer said he expected an investigation of some sort by the WNBA. He wasn’t as concerned with the non-call on Plum at the end. That’s a bang-bang play that could go either way and referees are reluctant to whistle anyway. But he also said the ESPN television broadcast will show without a doubt that he requested a timeout. It was a tough way to lose. 

“It’s unfortunate,” Laimbeer said. “It didn’t cost us the game. But it cost us a good shot.”

Even Mystics players like guard Kristi Toliver admitted they heard the timeout call and were surprised play wasn’t stopped. Las Vegas' players were thinking more about the possessions before the final one when they had chances to tie a game they played well enough to win.  

“I think it really just started not even with the non-foul call, but with us not calling a timeout and being aware in that situation,” Aces forward A’ja Wilson said. “It really just comes to that it wasn’t just that. It was the plays and the turnovers that we had and the rebounds that we missed all added up to that. We can’t really fault the refs. It really comes from us.”

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Mystics squeak by Aces in last-second thriller to earn Game 1 victory

Mystics squeak by Aces in last-second thriller to earn Game 1 victory

WASHINGTON -- The Washington Mystics beat the Las Vegas Aces 97-95 in Game 1 of the WNBA Semifinals on Tuesday night. Here are five observations from the game...

1. The Mystics took Step 1 towards what they hope is the first championship in franchise history on Tuesday night, as they held off an Aces team with the size and athleticism to put up a real fight. But Washington's outside shooting and ability to limit mistakes proved too much in the first of a five-game series. 

The Mystics made 11 threes compared to the Aces' seven and committed only four turnovers while Las Vegas coughed up 13 of them. Emma Meesseman led the way with 27 points and 10 rebounds, shooting a crisp 12-for-18 from the field. Elena Delle Donne was next with 24 points, six boards and six assists. Natasha Cloud (12 points) was the only other Mystic in double-figures. 

Delle Donne made the game-sealing shot, a turnaround fadeaway with 32 seconds to go. That put the Mystics up by four and the Aces couldn't close the gap.

2. Despite having a nine-day layoff between games, it was the Mystics who came out sharp. They made six of their first 10 shots and led 21-10 with just over three minutes to go in the first quarter.

The Aces had played just two days before, yet they took several minutes to get adjusted. The Mystics' quickness gave them trouble, especially on defense where they caught Aces center Liz Cambage (19 points, 12 rebounds) sleeping on a pair of turnovers in the post.

It didn't last long, however. The Aces sped up and got going on the fastbreak. By the end of the first quarter, they were within three points. Though they attempted 13 fewer shots in the first than the Mystics did, they made 73.3 percent of their looks.

3. Speed was the key in Las Vegas' best stretches. In the second quarter, they pushed the pace to outscore Washington 30-20. Kelsey Plum (16 points, nine assists, seven rebounds), the 2018 first overall pick, lit the spark. She made the Mystics pay for not getting back on defense by creating quick opportunities off made baskets. 

The Aces were able to turn up the speed when they went small in the second quarter, with the 6-foot-8 Cambage on the bench. A'ja Wilson went to work, scoring eight of her 23 points in the second quarter.

4. Hurting the Mystics in the speed department was the knee injury to All-Star guard Kristi Tolliver. She played for the first time since Aug. 8 and had some rust to shake off. 

She wasn't limping, but didn't have her usual quickness. And it seemed like her insertion into the lineup affected the Mystics' rhythm early on, as they hadn't played with her in six weeks. They went 10-1 while she was out, making it a delicate task to bring her back and not disrupt a smooth operation.

From the looks of Tolliver on Tuesday night, it seems like she could be dealing with the injury throughout the playoffs. To remain effective, she will have to lean on her accurate outside shooting and abilities as a distributor. 

By the fourth quarter, she did just that. Tolliver got a pair of threes to fall and finished with eight points and four assists in 23 minutes.

5. The Mystics had a lot of support in Game 1. It was a big, energetic crowd that featured a host of their Wizards counterparts. John Wall, Rui Hachimura, Isaiah Thomas, Ish Smith, Thomas Bryant and Justin Robinson were among the players in attendance. General manager Tommy Sheppard was there along with executives Sashi Brown and John Thompson III. 

Ted Leonsis wants to see more synergy between his teams under the Monumental Basketball umbrella. Tuesday night was a good example.

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