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Should the Redskins make a run at trading for Browns tight end David Njoku?

Should the Redskins make a run at trading for Browns tight end David Njoku?

David Njoku wants out of Cleveland, and the Redskins have a big hole at tight end. It's that simple, right? Wrong. 

The 2017 first-round pick made just five catches last season amid reports he did not get along with former Browns coach Freddie Kitchens, but in his first two NFL seasons Njoku produced at a much higher level, averaging 44 catches for more than 500 yards with four touchdowns each season. 

He's got talent, for sure, but still this offseason Cleveland made Austin Hooper the richest tight end in the NFL, signing him to a four-year, $42 million contract. And the Browns drafted another tight end, Harrison Bryant of Florida Atlantic, in the fourth round. 

The word is new Browns coach Kevin Stefanski likes to deploy a lot of 12 personnel, meaning two tight ends on the field at once, but still that's a lot of money and draft capital invested at the position other than Njoku. It makes sense he wants out and a chance to be the top dog. 

So, with a talent void at the position, should the Redskins make a trade for Njoku?

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Like most things in life, it depends on the price.

With two years remaining on his rookie deal - Cleveland exercised the fifth-year option on Njoku's rookie contract for the 2021 season in April - he has value and could bring immediate stability to the Redskins tight end room. Right now that group looks to be led by Logan Thomas, who made 16 catches all last season and is a converted college quarterback. Rookie Thaddeus Moss appears to have the most upside of the group, but he's also working back from a foot injury that caused him to go undrafted.

Beyond Thomas and Moss, the Redskins have Jeremy Sprinkle, Richard Rodgers, Hale Hentges and Caleb Wilson. None of those names elicit much excitement. 

RELATED: FANTASY GURU LABELS GIBSON A SLEEPER FOR 2020

The reports out of Cleveland say the Browns don't want to trade Njoku, but would for a first-round pick. If that's true, the rebuilding Redskins shouldn't even pick up the phone. 

But, as training camp gets closer and this story lingers, that asking price could drop significantly.  If it gets to a Day Three pick, it's worth a conversation. 

Ron Rivera is focused on the long haul in Washington, building a sustainable playoff team for many years, not quick success in 2020. Njoku could help, but the team is also well-positioned to spend on a tight end in 2021 without giving up draft picks. Or they could see what they have in Moss in Thomas this season and draft somebody next year as needed. 

If the price is right, sure, but until that asking price drops, don't expect much to happen. 

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Andrew Brandt says near impossible to get new Redskins name before Week 1

Andrew Brandt says near impossible to get new Redskins name before Week 1

Regardless if fans like the current name or want it changed, just on time alone the Redskins face a near impossible task to change their moniker in time for Week 1 of the 2020 NFL season. 

Andrew Brandt is an expert on NFL business and worked for the Packers for a decade. His work can be read in MMQB among others, and on Monday, he explained to the Redskins Talk Podcast that a new name and logo for the Redskins before the 2020 NFL season kicks off will require a "Herculean effort."

Normally changing the name of a football franchise valued at more than $3 billion would take years, with focus groups and market research to back up the decision. In this case, Washington is slated for a preseason game in Nashville on August 15th and to host their regular season opener on September 13th at FedEx Field. 

RELATED: SANTANA MOSS SAYS IT'S A PERFECT TIME TO CHANGE NAMES

The preseason opener is a little more than a month away, and the team hasn't even provided a timeline on a name change. In fact, though it's widely expected to come, the team hasn't even publicly said they're going to change the name at all.

It's hard to fathom the team could roll out even just new uniforms by August 15th, let alone erase every Redskins logo on their official stationery, moving supplies, marketing materials, and so on by September 13th. 

Brandt believes it could make sense for the team to just go by Washington this season and allow appropriate time to pick a new name for the 2021 season. 

"Maybe we have this provisional name without a lot of marks out there," he said. 

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A provisional name could end up being the Washington Football Club or something similar. 

For every fan making their case for Red Wolves or RedTails or Warriors or Hogs on social media and new uniform images on Instagram, realize that the effort to change the name goes miles beyond just new uniforms.

And to the experts, whatever that new name is won't be in play for 2020. 

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D.C. Congresswoman has proposed bill for RFK Stadium site as soon as Redskins change name

D.C. Congresswoman has proposed bill for RFK Stadium site as soon as Redskins change name

D.C. Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton is prepared to bring a bill to Congress to buy the federal land that houses RFK Stadium in an effort to get a new facility built for the Washington football team. 

As soon as the Redskins change their name. 

"I certainly will. This is unused land. Unused Federal land. And the District can’t afford, because we have a height limit, to have any land go that goes unused. I couldn’t get this bill through even when Republicans controlled the House," Norton said Monday. "So I now believe I can get it through only after the name is changed for the good of the District of Columbia."

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Speaking exclusively with the Redskins Talk Podcast, Norton explained that a new stadium on the RFK site will make a tremendous economic impact for both the citizens of D.C. and for Redskins owner Dan Snyder.  

"Everybody wants to come to the nation’s capital. Events benefit tremendously by coming to the nation’s capital," the congresswoman said. "But you’ve got to have a place to hold those events. There was only one place to hold those events. And [not having] that place has - for no good reason - cost all those involved, including the District of Columbia, but above all Dan Snyder, a boatload, indeed a fortune, in revenue.”

The Redskins haven't played in D.C. since the late 1990s and, coincidental or not, the team has experienced barely any postseason success in that same time period. Norton might not be the biggest football fan, but she knows what's good for Washington football fans. 

"The time has come, it’s way overdue."

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