Wizards

Wizards

With everyone getting nostalgic for throwback hoops these days, here's a look at five 1990s players who would be better fits for today's NBA than the were in the era they played in...

Glen Rice, SF

Rice wasn't so underrated that he didn't make All-Star teams or even All-NBA. He made a few of those and was even a household name for many fans given his college career and the NBA markets he played in. But looking back at his numbers, it seems like he should have received a lot more credit for being a star.

Rice had some years he didn't make the All-Star team that make you scratch your head, like in 1994-95 when he averaged 22.3 points and shot 41 percent from three. At his peak, he was averaging nearly 27 points and shooting a ridiculous 47 percent from long range. Despite being such a great shooter, he only averaged 3.9 three-point attempts per game for his career. If he played today, he would have had the green light to attempt many more.

Dale Ellis, SG/SF

Ellis made All-NBA and the All-Star team once, but that doesn't seem like enough. From the 1986-87 season through 1998-99, so 13 years, he averaged 17.9 points per game while shooting 40.6 percent from three (4.0 attempts) with a 54.2 effective field goal percentage.

Ellis didn't fill up the box score in many other categories, but the efficiency suggests he would have been relied on a lot more in today's game. He was regularly among the NBA leaders in eFG%, he just didn't get the credit for it he would if he played now.

 

Walt Williams, SF

'The Wizard' was a three-point specialist for a long time in the NBA, but back then it was easy to be boxed in by that role. If Williams played now, some team would likely unlock his range to turn him potentially into an All-Star. Williams was 6-foot-8 and in 1996-97 hit 40 percent from three on 6.0 attempts per game.

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While Williams sometimes fell into the category of 'tweener,' nowadays he would be an ideal fit as sort of a positionless sharpshooter. And given he shot 39.9 percent from three in his last three seasons, maybe he would have played past the age of 32.

Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf, PG

Those who didn't watch Abdul-Rauf, who was formerly known as Chris Jackson, play perhaps know him from when Phil Jackson drew a comparison between him and Stephen Curry. Abdul-Rauf had plenty of acclaim in college and early in his NBA career, but it seems like he would have had more success in the pro ranks now because players like him are more commonplace.

Abdul-Rauf was undersized, but made up for it with his range and at his peak shot just south of 40 percent from three. Though Curry is much better, he along with Trae Young and others are disciples of Abdul-Rauf. Abdul-Rauf also likely would have been given more leeway nowadays for the political stances he took as a player.

Toni Kukoc, SF/PF

On one hand, more people probably know who Kukoc is than the average player of his caliber from the 1990s era simply because he played on three title teams with the Bulls. But Kukoc is viewed as a good role player and not a star. If he played now in the right situation, he could have made a much larger impact and probably made a few All-Star teams.

In his prime, he regularly held an eFG% over 50 and filled up the stat sheet in a variety of ways. The 1998-99 season, the first after Michael Jordan's second retirement, is a good example. Kukoc averaged 18.8 points, 7.0 rebounds, 5.3 assists and 1.1 steals. At 6-foot-10, he had some unicorn tendencies before they were popular.

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