Wizards

Wizards

CAPITAL ONE ARENA -- There has been no mystery for the Wizards and their intentions to offer All-Star shooting guard Bradley Beal a contract extension this Friday, July 26, the first day that they can. General manager Tommy Sheppard told ESPN their plan to offer Beal the full max, projected at $111 million over three years, a contract that would begin with the 2021-22 season.

Wizards managing partner Ted Leonsis then reiterated as much following the team's press conference on Monday to introduce their new front office leadership.

"Brad is such a high integrity person and he wants the best for our fans and the best for our organization. So, of course, we will go pay respect to him and his management team and his family," Leonsis told NBC Sports Washington.

What Leonsis is not certain of, however, is whether Beal will actually sign the contract. There are reasons why he won't – like the fact he could make over double the money in a five-year deal if he bets on himself, makes All-NBA next season and qualifies for a supermax.

Beal was apprehensive about signing a supermax this summer when asked about it in April. He said he needed to see the direction the organization was going because he wants to win more than he wants to squeeze every dollar out of his next contract.

Beal shared those thoughts about a contract that was expected to be worth $194 million over four years. Now it's less money the Wizards can offer.

Leonsis doesn't know what Beal will ultimately decide, but he does believe it will take time before the team hears his verdict.

 

"I don't expect Bradley Beal to say 'thank you' and sign the contract when Tommy goes to see him on the 26th," Leonsis said.

The challenge for the Wizards when it comes to selling Beal on their future is that they just reset the organization for the long-term. They restructured their front office to add Sashi Brown as chief operations and planning officer, beefed up their medical staff with Dr. Daniel Medina and created a new athlete development and engagement department led by John Thompson III. 

But these changes won't bear fruit immediately. They need Beal to see what they see down the road, how the foundation they have laid could lead to a winning basketball team.

Leonsis said he kept Beal updated on the process of finding new executives every step of the way. Leonsis, Sheppard, Brown, and others now need to get Beal on board with the long-term vision.

"All those things are put in place to show him that we're tooling this together for the long-term," Sheppard told NBC Sports Washington.

"Everything we're putting in today will be exponential. It is a commitment to grow and for a long time, not just for today or this summer for free agency. This is for the rest of your career."

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