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Wizards 2018-19 roster outlook: Versatile Troy Brown, Jr. will have to fight for minutes as a rookie

Wizards 2018-19 roster outlook: Versatile Troy Brown, Jr. will have to fight for minutes as a rookie

With training camp starting later this month, we at NBC Sports are previewing the season for each player on the Wizards' roster. 

Today, we look at Troy Brown, Jr., a rookie from Oregon who will back up Otto Porter, Jr. and Kelly Oubre, Jr.

With added depth at multiple positions on the Wizards' roster, it may be difficult for the No. 15 overall pick to crack the rotation. 

That said, don't bet against him.

WIZARDS 2018-2019 ROSTER OUTLOOK: Troy Brown Jr.

Player: Troy Brown, Jr.

Position: Small forward

Age: 19

2018-19 salary: $2.8 million

2017-18 stats: 35 G, 31.2 mpg, 11.3 ppg, 6.2 rpg, 3.2 apg, 1.6 spg, 0.2 bpg, 44.4 FG%, 29.1 3P%, 74.3 FT%, 49.4 eFG%, 105.7 ORtg, 102.4 DRtg (in college)

2018-19 storyline: The Wizards surprised a lot of people with their first-round pick this past June, the first draft selection they had made since 2015. Instead of going with Robert Williams, who was a fit at the time based on his position, or another player they had been tied to in mock drafts, they opted for Troy Brown, Jr. out of Oregon. 

Brown joined the Wizards at just 18 years old and with one year of college ball under his belt. Despite his age and lack of experience, there is a lot to like about Brown, who is mature beyond his years both on and off the court.

Versatility is a key part of his appeal. Though he's still learning who he is as a basketball player, Brown can do a little bit of everything. He can handle the ball, pass, rebound and play defense. There are gaps in his game, but ones the Wizards believe they can teach. 

The team feels Brown is well ahead of the curve from a basketball IQ perspective and that was on display in the Summer League in July. Brown was a clear standout on the Wizards' team in Las Vegas and thrived at multiple positions. He projects to play mostly at small forward and shooting guard but has experience at point guard and the Wizards feel he can hold his own running the offense. 

The question for Brown entering this season will be whether he can crack the rotation as a rookie. When they drafted him, his role appeared to be clear. But then they added Austin Rivers in a trade, shoring up their backup shooting guard spot, and they signed Jeff Green, who gives them depth at forward.

Unless Brown takes to point guard earlier than expected, he may have trouble finding minutes as a rookie, barring some sort of injury.

The Wizards happen to be set in the short-term at small forward with Otto Porter, Jr. as their starter and Kelly Oubre, Jr. as his backup.

Beyond this season, Brown has a defined role as a top-two small forward on the roster, as they will likely not be able to keep both Porter and Oubre beyond this season.

For now, he may have to wait his turn.

The Wizards are in a good spot as it pertains to Brown. At the very least, he gives them a long-term prospect to develop, one that can spend time both at the NBA level and with their G-League team this season. If he develops quicker than expected and earns minutes from head coach Scott Brooks, that will be a bonus.

They don't need him to be good right away, but will certainly welcome it if it happens.

What may hold Brown back early in his career is his inability to shoot from long range. He shot just 44.4 percent from the field in college and 29.1 percent from three. Developing at least a respectable three-point shot will be paramount to his success in the NBA. 

There are ways Brown could help the Wizards in the short-term, if he's given the opportunity. He is an active and intelligent defensive player. He is also unusually gifted at both passing and rebounding for a player at his size and position. The rebounding may take time as he adjusts to playing against bigger and strong players, but his passing ability could stand out very quickly.

It's unclear how much we will see of Brown this season, but it will be intriguing to watch the start of what could be a long career in Washington.

Potential to improve: Outside shooting, strength, finishing at rim.

2018-19 WIZARDS ROSTER OUTLOOK:

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On this date in tournament history: Chris Webber calls timeout

On this date in tournament history: Chris Webber calls timeout

The Michigan Wolverines were down two points to the North Carolina Tar Heels with 19 seconds to play in regulation in the second half of the 1993 NCAA National Championship game.

After grabbing the rebound off the missed free throw attempt, Michigan star Chris Webber (23 points, 11 rebounds) established his pivot foot, re-angling his body towards the basket, locked in a one-possession game with the championship on the line. 

Webber attempted to dish the ball off to a teammate, but after seeing a lurking Tar Heel, the future No. 1 pick continued his dribble towards halfcourt. 

The travel call was missed by the officiating staff, but not by the broadcast crew.

"Oh, he walked," Bill Packer exclaimed on the broadcast. "He walked and the referee missed it!"

CBS announcer Jim Nance continued on with the gameplay, as only 12 seconds remained on the clock in regulation.

"Webber brings it into the frontcourt," Nantz said. "They have no timeouts remaining."

If only someone had told him.

Webber, trapped in the left corner by a UNC double-team, signaled for time, resulting in a technical foul shot for the Tar Heels as well as possession.

"He called a timeout," Nantz said. "Michigan doesn't have any!"

At the opposing foul line, UNC's Donald Williams (25 points) knocked down both free throws, increasing their lead to four points with 11 seconds remaining. 

From there it was all over.

North Carolina 77, Michigan 71.

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On this date in tournament history: Emeka Okafor leads UConn over Georgia Tech to win national championship

On this date in tournament history: Emeka Okafor leads UConn over Georgia Tech to win national championship

Before he departed on a very successful NBA career, former Wizards center Emeka Okafor was a standout member of the UConn Huskies.

In 2004 the Huskies went on to win their final nine games of the season before they captured the Big East championship.

After making their way through the NCAA Tournament bracket, the only team standing in coach Jim Calhoun's way were the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, lead by future Wizards guard Will Bynum (17 points, five assists).

Georgia Tech didn't back down early, taking a 12-11 lead over the Huskies with 13:41 to go in the first half. 

Okafor (24 points, 15 rebounds) scored to give UConn the lead right back, and they never trailed again.

At halftime, the Huskies lead the Yellow Jackets by a staggering 15 points and they kept their foot on the gas to start the second half.

The Huskies were able to extend their lead to 25 during the second half before Bynum at Georgia Tech came roaring back, but by then, the game was out of reach.

UConn emerged with an 82-73 victory over the Yellow Jackets, led by Okafor and future NBA journeyman Ben Gordon (21 points).

Okafor was named the Final Four's Most Outstanding Player.

UConn's women's basketball team would go on to win its national championship a day later against the Tennessee Volunteers.

Connecticut became the first school ever in Division I to win NCAA titles in men's and women's basketball in the same season. 

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