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Woods back in Asia, preparing for next stage

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Woods back in Asia, preparing for next stage

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) Tiger Woods has already rated 2012 as a good year.

He won't consider it a great year, because it's missing one essential ingredient - a major victory - but he's becoming more confident that 2013 can be.

``I've always said winning one major championship turns a good year into a great year,'' he said on Wednesday ahead of the CIMB Classic, his first event in Malaysia in 13 years. ``We place so much emphasis on them. It's very similar to what tennis has with the Grand Slam events. Guys can have seven, eight, nine-win seasons, but if they don't win a Slam, it's not a great year.

``I remember playing back in `99; I had a really good run there, won a bunch of tournaments, but didn't win a major championship until the last one, the PGA. That all of a sudden changed the whole year.''

Asked about the doping scandal involving Lance Armstrong, Woods said golf couldn't be compared with cycling, not only because it was more individual, but also because of its ingrained code of honor.

``This is a sport where we turn ourselves in on mistakes,'' he said. ``A ball moves in the trees, the guys call penalties on themselves. I think that's one of the neat things about our game, and I think with the (anti-doping) testing, it's only enhanced that respectability throughout all of sport.''

Woods is back at The Mines Resort and Golf Club for the first time since he won the individual and team titles at the 1999 World Cup.

That, by his standards, was one of many great years until his life and career spiraled out of control in 2009 because of a string of infidelities that led to the breakdown of his marriage.

His three wins on the PGA Tour this season have restored the confidence that was missing during his long title drought - 27 starts in official tournaments - and he says he's ``absolutely'' targeting more major titles to challenge Jack Nicklaus' record of 18. He's also got Sam Snead's record for most wins on the tour still in his sights. He moved into second place this year with his 74th win, eight shy of Snead.

``There are things that are certainly more important, and fatherhood is No. 1,'' he said. ``Golf has always been a high priority in my life, but family has always been No. 1. So that hasn't changed. So, for me, I certainly want to break Jack's record and catch Snead's record. Those are all things that I would love to do ... but being the best father I can possibly be to my two great kids, that certainly is No. 1 in my life.''

There's not a lot riding on the CIMB Classic for Woods, apart from the $1.3 million first prize and the chance to keep refining his game. It's a 48-man, no-cut tournament on the par 71, 6,917-yard course at The Mines that is co-sanctioned by the Asian Tour, though it is not an official event on the PGA Tour. Woods can still earn world ranking points.

After Malaysia, Woods will duel with Rory McIlroy in China on Monday before finishing his season in the exhibition World Challenge next month.

He said he had been improving with his driver, but still needed to work on that and other parts of his game.

``I'm excited about turning some of my weaknesses into strengths,'' he said. ``I haven't driven very well in a very long time, and this year is probably the best I've driven in my entire career,'' he said. ``But my iron game wasn't as sharp, and neither was my short game.

``Certainly I need to get my iron game back to where it used to be.''

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The NHL salary cap numbers are in, what does it mean for the Caps?

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USA TODAY Sports

The NHL salary cap numbers are in, what does it mean for the Caps?

The NHL released the salary cap range for the 2018-19 season on Thursday. That sound you hear is the general managers frantically typing numbers into adding machines to figure out which of their players they can afford and which they are going to have to let walk.

The cap ceiling will rise from last year's $75 million all the way up to $79.5 million with the cap floor set at $58.8 million.

So what does this mean for the Capitals?

Here's a look at the team's pending free agents:

Unrestricted free agents: Jay Beagle, John Carlson, Alex Chiasson, Tyler Graovac, Jakub Jerabek, Michal Kempny, Anthony Peluso, Zach Sill, Wayne Simpson

Restricted free agents: Riley Barber, Madison Bowey, Travis Boyd, Adam Carlson, Philipp Grubauer, Tim McGauley, Liam O'Brien, Devante Smith-Pelly, Tom Wilson

We will not know exactly who will make the roster, so to project how much money the Caps will have to work with, let's assume Nathan Walker makes the team and Shane Gersich goes to the AHL. That will give the Caps a little less than $14.8 million with which to work.

Considering the team will need to use about half of that number if not more to re-sign Carlson, that's not a whole lot to work with.

Is $7 million enough to re-sign Beagle, Kempny, Bowey, Smith-Pelly and Wilson? Probably not and that does not even account for prospects who will try to compete for the NHL roster such as Barber and Boyd.

Here's what the cap ceiling tells us:

  • The team's entire offseason will depend on if the team can re-sign Carlson and for how much.
  • Carlson's cap hit last season was just under $4 million. A $4.5 million increase in the salary cap ceiling doesn't mean much when Carlson is going to get a raise of $3 million or more.
  • Grubauer will almost certainly be traded because he is an asset and because there won't be enough money for the team to commit $1.5 million or more to the backup goalie like they did last season.
  • If Carlson returns, fan favorite Beagle has almost certainly played his last game as a Cap. Everyone wants him back, but he would have to take a severe discount for the Caps to fit him and even then, he would be taking away a roster spot from a young prospect ready to make the jump to the NHL.

Free agency opens July 1.

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Derrius Guice continues to ingratiate himself with Redskins fans with new fundraising effort

Derrius Guice continues to ingratiate himself with Redskins fans with new fundraising effort

For most college players, being a part of the NFL Draft experience is a dream come true, but for Derrius Guice, it was becoming a nightmare. Originally projected as a first round pick, Guice saw his name falling fast on draft boards due to questions raised about his maturity and high-maintenance personality.

Two months removed from the Redskins selecting him 59th overall, Guice has erased any doubt regarding his character. Whether it be taking fans out to the movies, shooting the breeze while signing autographs, or even the occasional leap frog over two practice barrels and a trainer, Guice has ingrained himself as a Redskins fan favorite. He's done a great job at making himself popular, now he's focused on making change for others. 

On June 20th, a day before his birthday, Guice announced he would be running a fundraiser for the Mary Bird Perkins center, a cancer foundation in his hometown of Baton Rouge. Inspired by his best friend's mother who "rang that bell,"—an indication that a patient has beaten cancer—Guice wants to help others do the same. 

Guice has utilized his newfound popularity to entice other peope to donate. If you donate $5, you can play him in Fortnite. For $50, you guys can go bowling together. Anyone willing to donate $100 or more will be entered in a raffle for tickets to the Redskins Monday Night Football game against the Saints. 

If Guice can match his off the field popularity with on the field production, he'll be in contention for Rookie of the Year. Anyone interested in donating can click here