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Why police won't keep investigating Suh car crash

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Why police won't keep investigating Suh car crash

From Comcast SportsNet
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- Portland police have no plans to further investigate a car accident involving Detroit Lions defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh after two women claimed they suffered injuries in the wreck. The two women, who were not identified in a police report, came forward a day after the early Saturday morning accident to say they had been injured. The police report was amended to include the claims. Suh, who went to Grant High School in Portland and later played for Nebraska, is currently serving a two-game NFL-imposed suspension for stomping on Green Bay Packers guard Evan Dietrich-Smith during a Thanksgiving Day game. He is not allowed to take part in team activities while on suspension. Suh had returned to Portland from the Pac-12 championship game in Eugene when the accident occurred at 1:14 a.m. on Saturday. In the police report, Suh said he lost control of his 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle when he tried to go around a parked taxi and crashed into a light pole, a water fountain and a tree. Suh called 911 to report the accident and police at the scene said he was cooperative and did not appear to be intoxicated or show any other sign of impairment. No one at the scene reported any injuries in the crash, which drew a large number of spectators from a nearby nightclub. No citation was issued in the accident. One of the women was quoted in the amended police report as stating that speed caused the accident. "He was driving too fast and reckless all the time," the report quoted the woman as saying. "There was never a taxi. He was just going too fast and he could have killed someone at Dante's (nightclub)." The women, who say they were among four people in the car, said they left the scene because of the crowd the accident was attracting. The husband of one of the women picked the two up, the report states. The man took his wife to the hospital to be treated for a laceration on her forehead, a black eye, a "busted lip" and a sore shoulder, according to the police report. The other passenger did not seek treatment for a sore shoulder until the next morning, it said. The more seriously injured of the two said she had told Suh at the scene that she was hurt and needed a doctor, the police report said. In the 911 call, Suh said there were no injuries. The report states that the officer who arrived on the scene two minutes after the 911 call did not observe any victims in the area. Two other officers who arrived shortly thereafter also did not see anyone who required medical attention, and no witnesses reported any victims or said that Suh was driving recklessly. The women spoke to KGW-TV in Portland and recounted their version of the events, although they asked that their identities be withheld for privacy reasons. The more seriously injured woman showed KGW the stitches above her eyebrow and her swollen lips. Attempts by The Associated Press to reach the two women for comment on Tuesday were unsuccessful. Suh has not responded to repeated requests for interviews about his suspension and the accident. Portland police Sgt. Pete Simpson said that because the crash did not involve an intoxicated driver, traumatic injuries or vulnerable road users, it does not meet the department's investigation criteria. The 2010 Defensive Rookie of the Year, Suh has three sacks this season among five tackles for losses. He has been credited with 31 tackles and eight quarterback hits. When Suh played at Nebraska he pleaded guilty to negligent driving and paid a 60 fine after crashing into three parked cars. Suh, driving his mother's SUV, said he had swerved to avoid a cat. He also paid 48 in court costs and was disciplined by Huskers coach Bo Pelini. He was drafted by the Lions with the second overall pick in the 2010 NFL Draft. Suh has endorsement deals with Chrysler, Subway and Nike, among other companies.

Trump blasts NFL for not demanding players stand during national anthem

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AP

Trump blasts NFL for not demanding players stand during national anthem

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is again criticizing the NFL over players kneeling during the national anthem.

Trump said on Twitter Wednesday that the “NFL has decided that it will not force players to stand for the playing of our National Anthem.”

He adds: “Total disrespect for our great country!”

Trump appeared to be responding to the NFL annual fall meeting on Tuesday. The league invited players and representatives from their union to discuss social issues.

The topic of the national anthem was not discussed at length. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said owners did not ask players to commit to standing during the anthem.

Trump has suggested the owners should “fire” any players who knelt during “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

Ezekiel Elliott's suspension again on hold, now expected to play vs 49ers

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USATSI

Ezekiel Elliott's suspension again on hold, now expected to play vs 49ers

NEW YORK — Dallas Cowboys star Ezekiel Elliott was granted another legal reprieve Tuesday night in the running back's fight to avoid a six-game suspension over domestic violence allegations.

A New York federal judge issued a temporary restraining order blocking the league's suspension, clearing Elliott to play Sunday at San Francisco.

U.S. District Judge Paul Crotty's ruling came five days after a federal appeals court overturned a Texas court's injunction that had kept Elliott on the field.

Crotty granted the request for the restraining order pending a hearing before the presiding judge, Katherine Polk Failla, who is on vacation.

The NFL was ordered to appear before Failla on or before Oct. 30 to argue why the suspension should not be blocked by a preliminary injunction — the next step in the legal process — until the court can rule on challenges the players' union brought against the suspension.

"We are confident our arguments will prevail in court when they are taken up again later this month," NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said.

Elliott, last year's NFL rushing leader as a rookie, was barred from the team's facility Tuesday as players returned from their off week. The NFL placed him on the suspended list Friday, a day after the league's favorable ruling from the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans.

The 22-year-old Elliott was suspended in August by Commissioner Roger Goodell after the league concluded following a yearlong investigation that he had several physical confrontations in the summer of 2016 with Tiffany Thompson, his girlfriend at the time.

Prosecutors in Columbus, Ohio, decided not to pursue the case in the city where Elliott starred for Ohio State, citing conflicting evidence, but the NFL did its own investigation. Elliott denied the allegations under oath during his NFL appeal.

The suspension's announcement in August led to weeks of court filings, with NFLPA lawyers contending that league investigators withheld key evidence from Goodell and that the appeal hearing was unfair because arbitrator Harold Henderson refused to call Goodell and Thompson as witnesses.

In an opinion accompanying the ruling, Crotty agreed with the Texas judge who had backed the claims of Elliott's attorneys. Crotty wrote that Henderson's denial of testimony from Goodell and Thompson was significant because of credibility issues related to Thompson.

"In effect, (Elliott) was deprived of opportunities to explore pertinent and material evidence, which raises sufficiently serious questions," Crotty wrote.

Attorney Daniel Nash, arguing for the NFL, accused Elliott's legal team of seeking relief from courts in Texas to evade courts in New York and the effect of the April 2016 ruling that reinstated a four-game suspension of New England quarterback Tom Brady in the "Deflategate" scandal.

Nash warned Crotty that allowing the union to continue to delay the suspension would invite "every player who's suspended" to go to court for relief.

"They know under the Brady decision they have no chance of success. None," Nash said.

Attorney Jeffrey Kessler, representing the players' union, said the harm to a player's short career was serious when a suspension is served.

"He can never get that back," Kessler said, arguing that the irreparable harm — among issues of law considered before a temporary restraining order is granted — faced by a player is much greater than harm claimed by the league when a suspension is delayed. In his opinion, Crotty agreed.

Nash suggested during the hearing that the union was overstating its claims of irreparable harm.

"In their view, an NFL player missing six games is the end of the world," he said.

Brady managed to delay his suspension for a year through the union's court challenges. He served it to start last season, when the Patriots went 3-1 without him and later won the Super Bowl.

Elliott's case shifted to New York after the appeals court ordered the Texas court to dismiss Elliott's lawsuit, which Judge Amos Mazzant did earlier Tuesday.

A three-judge panel of the New Orleans court ruled 2-1 last week that Elliott's attorneys filed the Texas lawsuit prematurely because Henderson had yet to decide on the running back's NFL appeal.

Elliott's legal team indicated it intended to pursue rehearing before a larger panel of the appeals court while also filing for the restraining order in the Southern District of New York.

The NFL filed in the New York court after Elliott's NFL appeal was denied because the league considers it the proper venue as the home of its headquarters and the site of the hearings before Henderson. It's also where the NFL won the Brady case in the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.