Patriots

Hard work is for losers, just ask Miami

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Hard work is for losers, just ask Miami

By Jon Fucile
Special contributor to WickedGoodSports.com

The Miami Heat have been the NBA's, and arguably the sports world's, hottest topic since the season opened. You all know the story of how Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh and the weak willed LeBron James got together to form the greatest dynasty in NBA history and win eleven consecutive NBA titles!!!

Oh wait, that's just what they predicted. Sorry.

Unfortunately for the self absorbed trio, life has not been all lollipops and rainbows.

You all know by now that the Heat stars are upset because their coach is making them work too hard. Poor 'lil guys. They wanted to just hang out all day and high five, not practice or work hard on the court. The NBA, and all the other teams, should just hand them titles because they're so super awesome. Hard work is overrated. Maybe the three of them could go to schools and teach that to kids.

But their reaction got us thinking' what if other 'great' people throughout history decided they didn't want to work hard for their goals either? We decided to take a look.

What if our fore fathers did not feel like working hard? What if they just said fighting the British is too much work, let us give up and just let the British continue to rule us? What if Ben Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and Paul Revere said screw, let's go drink some tea and buy some red coats and get on this British bandwagon?

Instead of playing basketball James, Bosh and Wade would be wearing knickers and eating tea and crumpets.

What if Dr. James Naismith did not want to work hard?

For those of you who do not know, Dr. Naismith was a Canadian P.E. professor at the YMCA. One rainy afternoon he was trying to figure out how to keep his class active indoors and began to formulate what would become current day basketball.

He decided on the rules and then put up a peach basket for the kids to shoot into and thus the game of basketball was born.

But what if Dr. Naismith did not want to work hard? What if he was content to let the kids run wild in the gym while he just took a nap?

Chris Bosh, Lebron James and Dwyane Wade would probably have other jobs. Low impact jobs that require little to no work. Like testing hammocks.

To further complicate the problem for the the Heat, unlike in modern times when the ball simply falls back down through the net after a basket, the peach basket still had the bottom attached and the ball had to be manually retrieved. If the Miami Heat played in those days, they would never score more than 2 or 3 points. Getting the ball would probably be too much work.

Instead of shooting into a peach basket, Dwyane and LeBron would hang out in the hammock and make Bosh pick them peaches.

Millions of peaches. Peaches for free.

Evolution works hard every day. Both humans and animals are leagues ahead of where they used to be all thanks to the hard work of evolution.

But what if one day, back when people were evolving, evolution just said... you know what? People need to be taller, but that is just too much work?

Where would Bosh, Wade and James be today? Not playing basketball. They'd be too short!

That's right... acting gigs. Whenever a casting call would go out for "egotistic little people" they would be the first three to respond.

One day, somewhere in the history of dating, there was a couple who felt bad that one of their single friends had nothing to do every Friday and Saturday night. They took pity on their friend and started inviting them to come along on dates. The 'Third Wheel' was born.

But... where would Chris Bosh be if that couple thought it was too much work to ask their single friend to tag along?

He'd still be stuck in Toronto where nobody cares. And people might still think he's a great basketball player. Whoops.

Before games, LeBron James likes to dip his hands into a bowl of chalk and then toss it into the air in a "look at me! look at me! seriously everyone look at me!" display because apparently he did not get enough attention as a child.

But getting all that chalk is hard work! Someone has to get it for him, crush it into a fine powder and then deliver it to him.

But what if, one day, James' chalk fetcher decided it was too much work to get the chalk? What if LeBron just had to toss whatever he wasn't using into the air?

Although picking up all those things is probably too much work. He'd probably just take a nap.

The Heat also wish the guy who created the NBA playoffs didn't want to work hard. They were hoping the title would be awarded to the team with the biggest collective ego and sense of self importance without having to play any games.

So keep spreading the message that hard work and dedication is overrated. Keep acting like you should just be handed everything without working for it. And maybe, just maybe if kids don't work real hard, someday they can win nothing together but act like they're already the best team ever just like you.

QUICK SLANTS THE PODCAST: Jerod Mayo breaks down the best way for Patriots to attack Jaguars defense

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QUICK SLANTS THE PODCAST: Jerod Mayo breaks down the best way for Patriots to attack Jaguars defense

Jerod Mayo talks with Tom E. Curran and Phil Perry about the Patriots AFC Championship matchup with the Jacksonville Jaguars.

(2:00) Jerod Mayo gives his X’s and O’s breakdown of the Jaguars defensive schemes and traits.

(5:00) Jerod gives his opinion on how the Patriots offense should attack the Jaguars defense.

(8:30) Could Gronkowski be the key to the Patriots offense? What would be the best way to use him?

(15:00) Does the Jaguars defense have a weakness against vertical routes?

(17:00) Jerod Mayo explains why James White could be a key once again for the Patriots. 

(21:00) Will Jaguars change their defensive scheme after allowing 42 to the Steeler?

(23:00) Will much will the Jaguars having the ‘nothing to lose’ mindset impact the game?

Sounds like some Bruins players suffering from Claude fatigue

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Sounds like some Bruins players suffering from Claude fatigue

BRIGHTON, Mass – The resume for Claude Julien speaks for itself in terms of greatness in Boston, so he certainly will get a warm ovation from the TD Garden crowd in his first visit back to Boston since getting fired last February. Julien coached the Boston Bruins for 10 years, won a franchise record 419 games over that time span, made it to the Cup Finals twice and of course hoisted the Cup in 2011.

It won’t matter that he’s now the head coach of the Montreal Canadiens when Julien gets his video tribute, and basks a long ovation similar to the one he received when he was recognized for passing Art Ross on the B’s all-time wins list a couple of season ago. The warmth will be a little weird in the middle of a Bruins/Canadiens rivalry game, but it’s clear that Bruins fans appreciate the job done by Julien for such a long period of time.

The mutual respect was also clear when players like Patrice Bergeron spoke warmly of their coach ahead of last weekend’s showdown in Montreal, which the Bruins eventually pulled out in a shootout at the Bell Centre.

But it would seem the Bruins are starting to get a little tired of tossing verbal bouquets at the guy that’s now behind the Habs bench. It all started with Tuukka Rask’s postgame reaction on Saturday when asked if there was any extra emotion going up against his old coach for the first time.

“He was not playing a shift on the ice, so it doesn’t really matter. He was coaching, so it was nothing special,” said Rask, matter-of-factly.

So there wasn’t any added emotion for Rask going up against Julien’s new team for the first time?

“Nope,” said Rask.   

That line of questioning continued again after Tuesday’s practice at Warrior Ice Arena with Julien coming back to the Garden for the first time.

“Well, I can tell you what’s going to happen,” said Rask. “We’re going to start the game, at some point there’s going to be a video montage, we’re going to tap our sticks and the crowd is going to clap their hands and give him a warm welcome. Then the game is going to continue.”

Does Rask expect either he or some of his longtime teammates will get emotional if they see Julien showing some emotion during his ovation?

“No,” said Rask.

Is it really that cut-and-dry, the Bruins goaltender was asked?  

“It’s just another game,” said Rask, who improved to 8-15-3 lifetime against the Montreal Canadiens after last weekend’s shootout win. “It’s probably special for him to come back and be on the other side, but for us it’s just another game.”

Similarly, Marchand was much more understated speaking about Julien on Tuesday after speaking enthusiastically last weekend about the many discussions player and coach had about “becoming a better a pro” early in his career. But the Bruins winger wasn’t about to get all warm and fuzzy when asked about any greeting that his former coach is expected to get while the legendary Bruins/Habs rivalry plays out on the ice.

“I’m not really looking forward to it, but I’m sure he is,” said Marchand, when asked about the fan reception from Bruins fans awaiting Julien on Wednesday night. “It doesn’t really have anything to do with me, but I’m sure he’s excited to come back. He’s deserved that video and I’m sure a lot of people will be excited to see him again. I’m sure it will be a memorable game.”

Marchand went on to say he "learned a lot" from Julien during their time together, and clearly still has a high level of respect for his former coach. 

 Maybe it’s the very nature of the Bruins/Habs rivalry, or maybe the Bruins players are suffering from a little Claude Julien question fatigue with the two teams playing three times in a span of eight days. Maybe we're even finally seeing some of the Bruins players that had tired of the longtime coach's methods by the end of his long-running tenure in Boston. 

But it sure sounds like some longtime Bruins players might be over it when it comes to the “Claude Bowl” aspect of the ongoing rivalry week between the two storied rivals.  

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